RLC Officer

#2
I could tell you what they do but im too well known and i would incriminate myself too easily! But suffice to say, forget about asking what they do....but how you would go about doing it! If you do it well and take advice from others and Seniors, then you will enjoy being an Officer.
Although i said i wouldnt tell you ill let you into the daily lives of the Officers in my Sqn.
OC, works hard and listens to his/her Seniors. (well i wasnt going to say anything else was i, but its true)
AO, works well, and is a nice bloke/bird.
Ops Officer, trys hard, looks puzzled a lot of the time.
Tp Comdr, looking for his/her desk chair at moment to replace the 6ft bench we put into his/her office prior to them being posted in. Also looking puzzled why his/her desk is smaller than his/her SNCO's!
 
#4
Its not down to being threatened, its down to the fact that most junior officers think they know better and the new system they have thought of is original.

I've lost count of the junior officers I see go due to the fact that they never listen.
 
#6
Col Rothney,
RE: Dealing with Seniors
1st rule - 'don't bite'. You will only be made to look foolish.
2nd rule - Listen to advice. You don't have to take it. If you do receive good advice be grateful, they will be more likely to offer it in the future, particularly if you are in a tight spot.
3rd rule - Engage brain before mouth and don't refuse advice out of spite.

Finally, just as there are shite Offrs there are shite seniors waiting for you to fall on your ass. Be the bigger man.
 
#7
Rothney said:
I am not joining the Army as a commissioned Officer merely 'take advice off seniors'. I have been in military circles long enough to notice the palpable loathing that senior, seasoned SNCOs have for the young officer type and it is often down to feeling threatened.

Yes cooperate and treat seniors with respect, they have earned it and know their roles very well, but an officer is an officer.
I have never felt threatened from any officer, old or young! I dont loathe any officer, young or even old.
Can you explain your last paragraph when you say an officer is an officer?
 
#8
Rothney said:
Yes cooperate and treat seniors with respect, they have earned it and know their roles very well, but an officer is an officer.
You don't appear to have learnt that one should not use the word you're defining in the definition. Maybe ETS is not quite the way forward....
 
#9
Rothney, what are you on?

In one sentance you say you are yet to pass AOSB but in another say you are not joining as a commissioned officer.

What is it to be?
 
#11
CH512O said:
Rothney said:
I am not joining the Army as a commissioned Officer merely 'take advice off seniors'. I have been in military circles long enough to notice the palpable loathing that senior, seasoned SNCOs have for the young officer type and it is often down to feeling threatened.

Yes cooperate and treat seniors with respect, they have earned it and know their roles very well, but an officer is an officer.
I have never felt threatened from any officer, old or young! I dont loathe any officer, young or even old.
Can you explain your last paragraph when you say an officer is an officer?
Rothney,

You haven't even done the AOSB, you certainly are not experienced enough to make a sound judgement on the relationship between YOs and SNCOs.

In my experience, and it is not in the RLC but is in a CSS Corps, the reality of the situation is that YOs and SNCOs bring different skills and opinions to the situation, both groups recognise this and have a decent amount of respect for one another. A lot of the banter is just that and should not be taken too seriously - you may have some military experience, but you palpably have a lot to learn.

CH5120,

I very much doubt that he can explain that - it is a meaningless statement.
 
#12
An RLC Officer. Well as you are aware the RLC has a multitude of differing trades within it. I am at a Tpt Regt and so can only really comment on that particular role so far.

It seems to me though the main difference is that the RLC in general have a larger peace time role than most other Corps. Officers in every unit are involved in MS, Trg, Welfare to a degree, and Ops, but in the RLC aside from all this you have your alternate role. We frequently send out details in support of other unit's exercises, backloading equipment etc, so in an average week you may responsible for organising the required number of vehicles and crews, establishing the routes they are going to take, and trying to forsee any problems they might encounter. You don't do that alone, in fact you palm most of it off in parts to NCOs, but ultimately you are responsible for bringing in all together.

In this sense there are practical advantages to working within the RLC. You genuinely get a wide understanding of Logistics management, and even if you are not servicing vehicles, or considering drivers hours you pick up quite a lot of information about the subjects.
 
#14
Outstanding said:
Gentlemen, I suspect that our journalistic chum has buggered off?
Really a journalist? What kind of angle do you think he was looking for posting stupid questions all over the shop and mostly answering them himself (albeit, in the main, badly)?

Which paper would he be writing for to catch the scoop that 'Sandhurst is managable' or that SNCOs and Officers engage in a bit of banter I wonder? Well whatever paper it is I'm not sure that Col Rothney will be attracting many additional readers.
 
#16
Rothney,

As well you know I have previously answered your questions in an entirely sensible manner:

Rothney said:
Thanks for your advice Alf. Excellently delivered.

Whats the toughest part of the Commissioning Course?
It is quite clear from my above post that I don't think you are a journalist.

I have also said in the Officers Forum that some of your questions may be quite naive, which if all your questions have indeed been genuine, they have been naive. What strikes me as a little strange is that in this thread you state that

Rothney said:
I have been in military circles long enough to notice the palpable loathing that senior, seasoned SNCOs have for the young officer type.
A statement like this is completely at odds with someone with limited military knowledge saying the following in the Officers forum:

Rothney said:
II ask silly questions because I live in the north, where the association of people who served in the Army, never mind those who attended RMAS, is greatly more dispersed than say, in the south. I have spoken to one officer in my life about Sandhurst and got a big fat cheesy grin of a smile with "it awwight".
quote]

I myself joined with no previous knowledge of the Army and not knowing any serving or former member and I can see the benefits in this site for those trying to get some insight into the Army, and it is why I have tried to answer a few questions that have been posed on some of the threads.

As to your jibe at me I certainly have no requirement to massage my own ego - it is absolutely massive, and being in full working order is in no need of a massage thanks very much :wink: .

Finally I have a question for you; which is it to be Roth, have you been around military circles long enough or do you live in the north and have only met one Officer in your life, because it can’t be both now can it?
 
#18
Rothney said:
Alf_luckyun,

I live in the North. North West. No big garrisons here.

My 'circles' comment was in reference to my time as an army cadet working with the TA a lot, yes that may be funny to you but the point of 'circlegate' was to present to you that I have witnessed from many a Reg and many a TA SNCO what their opinions are of officers.

My impression is that junor NCOs and SNCOs appear to regard their officers with contempt (not all), not to their faces of course, but to younger, more distant people such as cadets. NCOs have a lot of experience in their roles and it seems that they find this difficult to deal with when being ordered by a younger, highly-trained officer fresh from RMAS. I am sure relations are fine in reality but a 45 year old Sgt does not like a 18 yr Old Lt giving him orders, its just what I have picked up.

Circlegate was me attempting to show you that I haven't been 'in' the army, but I have seen a bit of it.
You actually mean an "adequately" trained officer to pass RMAS and actually learn how his job really works.

Don't worry if you're going RLC they'll all be numpty f uckers, you'll slot right in me old china plate.
 
#19
Rothney

Can I suggest that you are spouting a gret deal from not a lot of knowledge.

There are good and bad officers and NCOs. The once showing their 'contempt of officers' to you - a cadet they have responsibility for - are the bad sort.

Assuming you aren't a journalist there is one answer - officers serve to lead. Sounds cheesy but officers are paid to lead soldiers. TomGBR states it all well.

Have to say I think you just get on with it and talk to the recruiters and stop wasting time by spouting on arrse.
 
#20
Dettingen said:
Rothney

Can I suggest that you are spouting a gret deal from not a lot of knowledge.

There are good and bad officers and NCOs. The once showing their 'contempt of officers' to you - a cadet they have responsibility for - are the bad sort.

Assuming you aren't a journalist there is one answer - officers serve to lead. Sounds cheesy but officers are paid to lead soldiers. TomGBR states it all well.

Have to say I think you just get on with it and talk to the recruiters and stop wasting time by spouting on arrse.
Completely agree with that post Dettingen - at the risk of massaging my own ego by daring to post at all that is :D
 

Similar threads

Latest Threads

Top