Risk Reduction Run

Discussion in 'OTC and ACF' started by msr, Oct 1, 2006.

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  1. msr

    msr LE

    How many recruits has this cost the OTC this year?

  2. As an OTC rep I must say if you cant do a 9 minute 20 mile then you are so unfit that you are a danger to yourself and the OTC if you commenced training. I think this is perfectly reasonable; with the new OTC directive the days of OTCs being social drinking clubs are over (thank god) whether they like it or not. If a more professional outlook means no-one wants to join then cull the lot (I hasten to add I am a strong supporter of OTCs). 80% of the bdget is meant to go on military training. If you have a lot of fat wheezy wasters then your training will be crap. Its meant to represent the army ffs and there are too many fat f*****s in both the regular and TA anyway and at the higher ranks as well. Sack the lot I say.
    Rant over.
  3. msr

    msr LE

    But isn't (wasn't) the aim of the OTC to give a positive view of the army to students?

    Anyway, isn't part of the point of being in the TA/OTC to improve yourself? To identify areas of weakness and improve on them? To stretch yourself mentally and physically? To set yourself challenging physical targets and meet them?

    Would you rather have someone who cruises the run and passes or someone who busts a tit and just misses out?

  4. The thing is if you have a bod who wants it that badly or even just a little they will train and believe me that distance in that time is not that difficult. It also means you then have a benchmark from which to set your more fun training. :D :oops: :D
  5. msr

    msr LE


    You are exactly right, but if you are going to recruit students without telling them of these requirements and bin them on day 1 hour 1, what sort of view of the army are they going to come away with?

  6. One thing I do know is that during the introduction weekend (this is a rifle it goes bang, this is a rat bag you,eat out of it e.t.c) is that the potential recruits will not be allowed to partake in the assault course, unless they have had their medical first. Does this mean that all children should have a medical, and a comprehensive safety brief before partaking in the monkey bars at their local park. Health and safety gone mad.

    Rant over

    As for the run , 14 mins ain't that hard surely. I suspect this has been dreamt up by some over zealous H+S bod , fed up of risk assesing the coffee machine. However with the changes in the OTC from being a social club to focusing more on producing TA/Reg officers perhaps it would be a better idea to alter the time to 10:30, 11:00 and then the more physical training can be cracked on with. Due to the limited training time that the otc have , an hour in the field extra per weekend would make a big difference , more time for practice, more rotation of command appointments e.t.c having been in an otc for several years I have noticed that the people who tend to leave are the ones who are knakered on exercise,generally through lack of fitness and tend not to enjoy the whole expireience,If the fitness standards were to be raised , or if more of a focus were to be put on fitness surely this would benefit the OTC's.

  7. If a spry 18 year old can't make that timing they are either woefully unfit, or lack the backbone to make the effort. best off without them. besides, on selection weekends surely they would be at the bottom of the pile?
  8. Some times they take more than fitness into consideration.

    '' your doing medicine/dentistry/vetinary studies?, welcome aboard''.
  9. Name says it all doesn't it?

    As a matter of record, our recruits are doing the run at their first drill night, after being selected at the weekend.

    Sometimes too much store is set by numerical results - who cares if you can do 55 or 75 press ups as long as you can tab from A to B within a given time then wait about whilst the i/c remembers what they were supposed to be attacking.

    Obviously some candidates should be excluded straight away, but the real test should come later during the actual training. Its surprising how many drop out after.

    Which reminds me I better buy some shorts.
  10. I don't think the risk reduction run is a bad idea, the OTC is overly subscribed, you might aswell cull the numbers a bit before cracking on with the rest of the selection.

    Msr, where were you on the Sunday anyway?
  11. woopert

    woopert LE Moderator

    I recall a number of the lumpy jumpers who in trying to run 1 mile in under 11mins would just break down bawling in tears after about 400 yards and have to be physically dragged to the finishing line during MTQ1. None of them went to camp and most self-booted by the end of the year. I don't think any of the lads were that bad, but there were a few not far off it.

    It would serve the OTC better to let in those physically capable of lasting the course but who are borderline on the leadership aspect than someone who perhaps has the leadership but can't run 400 yards without lying on the floor bawling their eyes out and having to be dragged to their feet to complete the run.
  12. Sorry how can they have the leadership ability if they can't keep up with the troops there leading????? :D :D :D :salut:
  13. As the person who posted this topic originally. Can I say that at no time did I say that potential cadets would not be enlisted if they did not pass the RRR. They will not be permitted to undergo any other form of physical training until they do. This ruling has been brought in for ALL TA recruits and not just for the OTC.
  14. In Southampton UOTC, the Risk Reduction Run will be conducted on the Selection Weekend (after medicals).

    It is certainly not the only selection criteria and there could be people who fail to pass it who are accepted- possibly someone with a short term medical problem as an example.

    I am sure it is the case with all OTCs that who gets accepted is a function of how many vacancies there are against how many people apply for a place. This will vary from year to year.

    However given the new physical training syallabus laid down in the MTQ 1 programme and the fact that a recruit cannot undertake any form of physical activity until they pass the RRR then anyone who does not pass the RRR on the Selection Weekend and is accepted is going to be a training risk.

    Given that OTCs have recently seen a reduction in their MTD budget and a directive to reduce their manning to the correct establishment by the end of each training year there really is not going to room in OTCs from now on for people who are not capable of meeting the Army's fitness standards.

    For anyone intending to join an OTC this year the RRR is going to be an important first step in the physical training programme and not passing it is probably going to rule you out of joining the unit, or continuing to be a member of the unit past the first couple of training weekends.
  15. Having done my selection weekend and passed, the RRR in 14 minutes was surprisingly over estimating, by a long stretch. As far as i was aware, 3 fails out of nearly 230 candidates. One of whom fell and injured herself, the other two, just fat knackers to be honest. It was a good idea, just to see who could actually run or not in the first place, but where i was, not really a tool to whittle down numbers