Rise of the Woodpikey.

All depends on the type of timber. Oak takes two years, Ash will burn dirty straight off the tree but will be seasoned in one year.

We reckon on three years for oak, split and stacked in the barn.
Better for the flue liner for a cleaner burn and less soot, although chestnut can be split and burnt same year.
The bottom line is get yourself a moisture meter, 15 to 20% moisture is good.
Less than £20 on Amazon.
Burn anything after that except any pine!
 
We reckon on three years for oak, split and stacked in the barn.
Better for the flue liner for a cleaner burn and less soot, although chestnut can be split and burnt same year.
The bottom line is get yourself a moisture meter, 15 to 20% moisture is good.
Less than £20 on Amazon.
Burn anything after that except any pine!
I don't have to worry, my flue is only 1 meter long on my boat, sweeping it takes a minute, if I open up the air on my stove I can get an impressive flame out the top like a V1 missile taking off.
 

goodoldboy

MIA
Book Reviewer
I'm working on it...

IMG-20220522-210253010-3.jpg

These are in the centre of the garden so get the most sun and will hopefully dry out faster.
IMG-20220522-210244623-2.jpg

These I've just plonked on the side and the wind has mucked them up a bit, they get a fair bit of sun.

I'm just using them for chiminea fuel so will end up smelling like a chimney sweep anyway. I try to set it up around 8 so as not to annoy the neighbours. Do you guys find you end up smelling of bonfire?

Maybe it's the crap fuel, oh well, it was free...
You're doing well chap. If it helps, leave a couple of inches between the building and the pile so that the air can circulate. Same as stacking it on an old pallet next time to let the air get underneath. I know you'll take that comment in the spirit intended as one wood-pikey to another!
 
You're doing well chap. If it helps, leave a couple of inches between the building and the pile so that the air can circulate. Same as stacking it on an old pallet next time to let the air get underneath. I know you'll take that comment in the spirit intended as one wood-pikey to another!

Project for when I get a bit of time for my logs, I have some felt spare from redoing the shed roof.

Seems simple....(will update on lost thumbs, etc).



I do need to build a cat-shelter in, I seem to have acquired some local strays who know a sucker when they see one. So I can store wood and give them somewhere to hide from the rain, inbetween poncing tins off me.
 

ZW Clanger

War Hero
Hi chaps
First time chainsaw purchaser/user in the UK.
Looking to chop through reasonably sized logs etc to prepare for the winter months.
Any pointers?
I was thinking Stihl or Hyundai petrol???
 

Mark_Addy

Old-Salt
I bought a small electric one because I couldn't face another part-buggered engine in my life. A course, or someone who knows what they're doing to show you, is a good idea.
 
Hi chaps
First time chainsaw purchaser/user in the UK.
Looking to chop through reasonably sized logs etc to prepare for the winter months.
Any pointers?
I was thinking Stihl or Hyundai petrol???
As noted, get trained first.
Also consider electric, either corded or battery.
 
Hi chaps
First time chainsaw purchaser/user in the UK.
Looking to chop through reasonably sized logs etc to prepare for the winter months.
Any pointers?
I was thinking Stihl or Hyundai petrol???
Stihl make a dinky little rechargeable job, good for telegraph pole size and quiet enough not to annoy neighbours. Also fits in a bergan for opportunity Woodpikey tasks.
Slight diversion- Millie the woodpikeydog took me shopping today…
479EB35A-9FEF-4C4C-9683-844BA4EBDABF.jpeg
 
Hi chaps
First time chainsaw purchaser/user in the UK.
Looking to chop through reasonably sized logs etc to prepare for the winter months.
Any pointers?
I was thinking Stihl or Hyundai petrol???
M'good chum has 2 petrol , Stihl & Husquvarna (& another on loan) Kosher brands, swears at them very regularly, cleaning, manifold bolts snapping etc.
Electric is nowhere near as much fun, but much better for occasional use (i.e. not taking down & portioning whole trees). My mate is seriously considering electric.
 
As others have said learn how to use it and get the PPE.
I had a MacAllister with my first woodburner which was a step up from the Netto special I first bought and currently have a Hyundai which has been great for cutting through the bounty Arwin brought me.

Other than the annoying popout thing which you have to push back in when starting from cold (you get the knack eventually) they're fairly cheap, powerful and tend to get good reviews.
 
I have repaired and rebuilt lots of petrol chainsaws and the cheap budget brands like Mcallister, JCB, Aldi, Lidl, B&Q etc are basically disposable, if something major is wrong its not worth repairing them, usually plastic parts that should be metal that have chewed themselves to bits.
 
Hi chaps
First time chainsaw purchaser/user in the UK.
Looking to chop through reasonably sized logs etc to prepare for the winter months.
Any pointers?
I was thinking Stihl or Hyundai petrol???
Whatever one you buy, treat yourself to one of these and a bar vice


1656601065014.png
 

Thoughts?
I have one of them, very reliable and sufficient for my needs of felling trees and logging them.
They won't do very large trees, but anything up to 18" trunks is doable.
We also have some other Stihl machinery which is handy as they all run on a 2% mix across the range, so there is no faffing about with different mixes for different 2 stroke stuff.
Spares are cheap enough on the various Amazon sites, as are different bars and chains for them.
The only bad news is that there is a design fault with the control switch that switches between start/choke/normal running and off.
There is a plastic fitting inside the housing, which is essentially a plastic hinge. After a while it wears out and pops out of the hinge, so when you switch it to off it doesn't stop running.
So you have to switch it the other way to full choke and that stops it.
From what I can see there is no way of repairing or modifying it.
Two other mates have exactly the same model, and exactly the same problem.
Aside from that it is a great hobby saw, enough to do logging and cutting and at a good price too.
And light enough for a coffin-dodger to use too!
 
Whatever one you buy, treat yourself to one of these and a bar vice


View attachment 673931
I bought one of these. Works well, got all the correct pitch and size settings for ease of use.

 
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Whatever one you buy, treat yourself to one of these and a bar vice


View attachment 673931
Over the years I've used various magic files (cutting through your wood onto paving slabs makes chains go blunt quite quickly for some reason?) and discovered that as I already had one of these:

and these:

You could end up with a lovely sharp chain within 5 mins.
With 3d printed soft jaws for the vice.
 
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