RIP Trooper Jack Sadler - HAC

#41
whiffler said:
Funeral was well attended according to BBC Web and BBC TV
It was indeed, just as he deserved, Exeter Cathedral was just about full.

The Cornishman said:
The majestic nave of Exeter Cathedral was filled with hundreds of mourners when the great wooden doors were opened and the flag-draped coffin of Trooper Jack Sadler was brought before the silent congregation.

The coffin of the 21-year-old university graduate and Territorial Army soldier was taken through the cathedral to the mournful sounds of an adagio in a minor key, the rhythmic clacks of the soldiers' boots and the distant murmur of a city Christmas shopping.

The service for Honourable Artillery Company Trooper Jack Sadler took place at 11.30am.



The mourners who attended the full military funeral yesterday were there to honour a courageous soldier who died in the Camp Bastion field hospital after the lightly armoured Snatch Land Rover in which he was travelling hit a roadside bomb in Helmand Province, Afghanistan, on December 4. He left behind a devastated family and his girlfriend, Pippa Chalklin.

Trooper Sadler, who grew up in Clyst St George, near Exeter, but had lived recently in London, was serving with the Honourable Artillery Company (HAC).

He graduated this year with a 2:1 degree in war studies at the University of London and then volunteered for deployment to Afghanistan.

He is the first HAC soldier to be killed in action since 1945.

Yesterday morning, traffic was halted as Trooper Sadler's body was borne on a light gun carriage five miles through a bitterly cold Exeter to the cathedral door; the pallbearers who then shouldered his coffin into the cathedral were fellow soldiers - mates - from the HAC. Trooper Sadler's regimental belt, hat and beret, and a rose, rested on the coffin.

Canon David Reindorp, HAC chaplain, started the service by telling the congregation that he was not ashamed to sob at the death of Trooper Sadler.

Few glowing epithets were left unsaid to him during the hour-long service.

A tribute from his father, Ian Sadler, read out by Major Nicholas Keyes, described Trooper Sadler as trustworthy, reliable, loyal, and likeably naughty; and as someone with a good sense of humour and an enormous love of his country.

He was widely seen in the TA as having charisma, intelligence, and stamina. There was little doubt he would have enjoyed an exceptional military career.

Patriotism was reflected in the service, which contained the hymnal version of Jerusalem, William Blake's ringing call for an English utopia, and two poems by Rudyard Kipling - If and My Boy Jack - read on behalf of Trooper Sadler's father and mother respectively.

Before the funeral, Trooper Sadler's mother, Jeannette MacDonald , said: "Jack's body has come home, but my beautiful boy will never return to hold me in his arms. His life has been extinguished but he will live on forever in my heart and the hearts of all those who knew and loved him.

"A wonderful son, a loving partner, a fun brother, an awesome Uncle Jack, a friend in a million and a very brave, proud and exceptional man."

Trooper Sadler's commanding officer, Lieutenant Colonel Alastair Caie , said the young soldier had been a "lion away from home" who lived his life fully and then "courageously gave it in defence of his values".

After the service, Trooper Sadler's body was taken for a private family burial at Clyst St George church.

He was buried facing towards Woodbury Common, the pebblebed heath where he loved to walk.
http://www.thisiscornwall.co.uk/dis...me=yes&more_nodeId1=232470&contentPK=19315392
 
#42
“Have you news of my boy Jack?”
Not this tide.
“When d’you think that he’ll come back?”
Not with this wind blowing, and this tide.
“Has any one else had word of him?”
Not this tide.
For what is sunk will hardly swim,
Not with this wind blowing, and this tide.


“Oh, dear, what comfort can I find?”
None this tide,
Nor any tide,
Except he did not shame his kind—
Not even with that wind blowing, and that tide.


Then hold your head up all the more,
This tide,
And every tide;
Because he was the son you bore,
And gave to that wind blowing and that tide!


Rudyard Kipling 1915
 
#43
The Cathedral was completely packed.
Media have handled it well.
He will be missed indeed.
His father is setting up a charity in his name, and a website will be set up in due course.
 
#44
Arrsers would wish to know that, following a private service attended only by family and close friends, final honours were provided by a small HAC contingent. 3 Volleys, A Present, Last Post and Rouse.

RIP Fella.
 
#47
One year on mate. Gone but not forgotten.

RIP Buddy.
 
#49
Rgtl_Stick_Insect said:
Arrsers would wish to know that, following a private service attended only by family and close friends, final honours were provided by a small HAC contingent. 3 Volleys, A Present, Last Post and Rouse.

RIP Fella.
Great post-RIP
 
#50
In the Garden of Rememberance, on the 11th, there was a cross for him in the HAC plot...at the front of the others.

Because of all the amalgamations, I had a number of plots to visit, from my RIrish/LIR/and London Reg days, and some names to remember, men who had fallen, who I'd never met, but had heard about from those who had, and indeed names of those who had told me the stories,who in turn, had just "faded away".

I touched Jack's wee cross, just to say hello, which is a family (my) tradition...I never knew the guy, but by all accounts he was a fine young man, and since I am ex-HAC, he and I were in the same tribe.

I feel so sorry for his family, and so angry that a very promising young life was snuffed out by medieval lunatics, the very "people" who when you look at it, he was there to help.

Oh well....
 
#52
very sad bears resemblance to Pvt Joe Whittaker who was doing one tour as a T.A soldier before Sandhurst


stand easy fella!
 
#53
I'm sorry to hear about Joe too, don't know the history though....guys like that are the best...do a bit of time in the trenches with the boys, so that when they are the boss, they will understand.

I'm so sorry that our country has lost two very fine men who would have been good commanders.
 
#54
so many guys going out to get some experience before embarking on their careers and unfortunately too many guys aren't coming back

he was 4para one of my friends an other ex OfrCdt was out in helmand with him.
 
#55
thanks for letting us know...no one in the maroon machine is a slouch, and his parting is a loss to us all. Sorry for your loss.

Just a tip though, looking at your strap line , "commission" has two 'm's , so if you want one...

Not said in a nasty way
 
#58
londonirish said:
In the Garden of Rememberance, on the 11th, there was a cross for him in the HAC plot...at the front of the others.

Because of all the amalgamations, I had a number of plots to visit, from my RIrish/LIR/and London Reg days, and some names to remember, men who had fallen, who I'd never met, but had heard about from those who had, and indeed names of those who had told me the stories,who in turn, had just "faded away".

I touched Jack's wee cross, just to say hello, which is a family (my) tradition...I never knew the guy, but by all accounts he was a fine young man, and since I am ex-HAC, he and I were in the same tribe.

I feel so sorry for his family, and so angry that a very promising young life was snuffed out by medieval lunatics, the very "people" who when you look at it, he was there to help.

Oh well....
Put one in Salisbury's market square for him, unfortunatly the rain ruined it. Importantly though he isn't forgotten and that's what matters.
 
#60
Countrylad said:
londonirish said:
In the Garden of Rememberance, on the 11th, there was a cross for him in the HAC plot...at the front of the others.

Because of all the amalgamations, I had a number of plots to visit, from my RIrish/LIR/and London Reg days, and some names to remember, men who had fallen, who I'd never met, but had heard about from those who had, and indeed names of those who had told me the stories,who in turn, had just "faded away".

I touched Jack's wee cross, just to say hello, which is a family (my) tradition...I never knew the guy, but by all accounts he was a fine young man, and since I am ex-HAC, he and I were in the same tribe.

I feel so sorry for his family, and so angry that a very promising young life was snuffed out by medieval lunatics, the very "people" who when you look at it, he was there to help.

Oh well....
Put one in Salisbury's market square for him, unfortunatly the rain ruined it. Importantly though he isn't forgotten and that's what matters.
Spooky....I live in London in the week, and in a wee village outside Salisbury at the weekends, with my tribe ( RHQ + kids) .

Normally, on Rememberance Sunday, I do the Salisbury gig, but this year I was in Ireland, in North Antrim, with my Mum, and got back to London on the Monday, and then went to Parliament/Whitehall on the Tues, the 11th.

Saw the last three old fellers from the not so Great War, then went to the Garden for the 11 o clock thing. All the 'tourists' were on Whitehall, plus all the great and the good, huge building-sized plasma screens etc...Hardly anyone was in the Garden, but everyone stood stock still for those two minutes. It was very moving.

I was with two pals of mine from the real (as opposed to internet) world, one of whom had been a crab, and totally understood, and the other of whom is an Aussie, only 24 (gosh that makes me feel old), who really wanted to learn, and totally "got" it, as modern yoof would say.

Sorry for waxing lyrical, but I am so pleased that Sadler is remembered in Cathedral Cities other than Exeter and London.

If I may ask, why did you do this nice thing? Did you know him at uni/otc? Or were you in the HAC?

Or do you just know his story, and just thought that you would remember him?

Either way, good drills.
 

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