RIP - Neal Peart, Arguably the best drummer of our time

Absolutely gutted on this news.

I never got to see them, even while I lived in Canuckada

Legendary Rush drummer Neil Peart dead at 67



Canada, and the rest of the world it seems, really loved Neil Peart.

Tributes to the Rush drummer-lyricist continued to pour in over the weekend following the Friday afternoon news of his death at 67 after a three-and-a-half year battle with brain cancer.

Peart’s passing, in his adopted home of Santa Monica last Tuesday, stunned fans and fellow musicians alike.

“Neil Peart had the hands of God,” Foo Fighters drummer Taylor Hawkins said on Instagram.

Hawkins and Foos frontman Dave Grohl, the latter previously the drummer for Nirvana, helped induct Rush into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2013.

“I still vividly remember my first listen of (their 1976 album) ‘2112’ when I was young,” said Grohl, also on Instagram.

“It was the first time I really listened to a drummer. And since that day, music has never been the same. His power, precision, and composition was incomparable.”

The Red Hot Chili Peppers’ drummer Chad Smith wrote simply: “Farewell to a king.”

Peart, a veracious reader, was famous not only for his muscular drumming skills on his enormous kit but his thoughtful use of the English language when it came to Rush’s lyrics.

Many fans wrote, “Exit the warrior” on social media in reference to Peart’s death, which is one of his famous lines from Rush’s 1976 hit Tom Sawyer.

“Definition of gut punched,” wrote American comedian-actor Brian Posehn (The Sarah Silverman Program) on Twitter.

“I feel like I just lost my cool uncle. My cool uncle that was also the best rock drummer to ever live.”

Metallica simply posted footage of guitarist Kirk Hammett and bassist Robert Trujillo playing Tom Sawyer during a concert with the words: “Rest in Peace, Neil.”

Josh Freese, who has played drums for everyone from Guns N’ Roses to Nine Inch Nails, posted an amazing air drumming video to a Peart drum solo on Instagram, partially writing: “Probably the most air drummed drummer of all time.”

Metallica drummer Lars Ulrich wrote on Instagram: “Thank you for inspiring me … especially in the early days when you took the time to talk to a young green Danish drummer.”

Public Enemy’s Chuck D remembered on his Twitter account the end of the Rock and Roll of Fame induction night:

“It was just myself & Neil Peart alone talking and laughing low in relief. The long night was over — a small table backstage sharing a unique moment without much word. Rest in Beats my man.”

In a 1994 story for his hometown paper, the St. Catharines Standard, Peart wrote that “in early adolescence, my hormones attached themselves to music … Rhythm especially seemed to affect me, in a physical way, and soon I was tapping all the time — on tables, knees, and with a pair of chopsticks on baby sister Nancy’s playpen. “

His parents response was to give him drum lessons for his 13th birthday and he never looked back, inspired by such famous drummers as Gene Krupa and The Who’s Keith Moon before he auditioned for Rush in 1974.

Canadians like actor Dave Foley, comic Rick Mercer, and musicians Bryan Adams, Billy Talent, and The Tragically Hip’s rhythm guitarist Paul Langlois also weighed in with much Peart love.

“We all looked up to him,” said Langlois on Twitter. “I think Rush was our biggest influence for many reasons.”

Tweeted Foley: “Over 20 years ago, one of my best friends John Kastner brought Neil Peart to my house in Laurel Canyon. We stayed up all night drinking whiskey and talking on more subjects than I knew existed. He was the friendliest curmudgeon in the world … We’ll never see his like again.”

Others famous musicians paying their condolences to Peart on social media included Stone Temple Pilots’ bassist Robert DeLeo, KISS members Gene Simmons and Tommy Thayer, The Beach Boys’ Brian Wilson, Peter Frampton, Jane’s Addiction drummer Stephen Perkins and Aerosmith bassist Tom Hamilton.
Source: ‘GUT PUNCHED’: Death of Rush drummer Neil Peart resonates worldwide




 
Even on their final tour they were excellent
 
I can appreciate the genius of each band member, but I hate, hate, HATE the music of Rush.

It doesn't help that they, along with The Guess Who and Bachmann Turner Overdrive are played to death on Canadian rock stations.
 
In my teenage years, I used to enjoy arguing with Rush fans at school, and in my neighbourhood, that Neil Peart wasn't half the drummer of Rat Scabies.
 

bedended

War Hero
In my teenage years, I used to enjoy arguing with Rush fans at school, and in my neighbourhood, that Neil Peart wasn't half the drummer of Rat Scabies.
Morning @WolvoExPunk,
I used do do something similar as a teenager with John 'Genesis', Eric 'Bones'(from the album 'Roll The Bones), Mark 'Zozo' and Malcolm 'Blackmoor'. They bit every time.
As an aside and don't know how true. When there was gossip of Scabies leaving '78/81ish? a mate was shortlisted after an audition but Scabies never left. Local urban myth? I believe S&/=y
 
Undoubtedly an excellent drummer, but, best in our time?

Phil Collins is a superb drummer, especially with Chester Taylor and Genesis [even though some of his solo music is not to my taste, his drumming is still superb)

I might also argue for Zak Starkey [son of Ringo, God-Son of Keith Moon] who is like Moon without the tantrums.

John Bonham? Always admired how he could keep time on Kashmir never mind his other work.

On a Jazz-Rock front Bill Bruford is exceptional, as is Charlie Watts, or Terry Bozzio [Frank Zappa]

Honourable mentions to Max Weinberg [E Street Band], Stewart Copeland, Ian Paice, Jim Keltner [probably the best session drummer in the states and least known] and maybe even Carmine Appice, Larry Mullen Jr, Phil Rudd [ACDC]

I can't argue "best" because there are different styles, I was blown away watching Collins & Thompson playing "Dance on a Volcano" live, ditto watching Zak Starkey with The Who, Steward Copeland on "Message in a Bottle".

I grew out of Rush's music, but Peart - a great drummer but "the best"?
 
Great drummer, definitely. Arguably the best of our time? Not even remotely close IMHO.

He was brilliant in his own setting, but that was fairly limited in scope. His big band playing on the Buddy Rich tribute concerts was atrocious, as just one example.
Still sad to lose someone who influenced many players.
 
Undoubtedly an excellent drummer, but, best in our time?

Phil Collins is a superb drummer, especially with Chester Taylor and Genesis [even though some of his solo music is not to my taste, his drumming is still superb)

I might also argue for Zak Starkey [son of Ringo, God-Son of Keith Moon] who is like Moon without the tantrums.

John Bonham? Always admired how he could keep time on Kashmir never mind his other work.

On a Jazz-Rock front Bill Bruford is exceptional, as is Charlie Watts, or Terry Bozzio [Frank Zappa]

Honourable mentions to Max Weinberg [E Street Band], Stewart Copeland, Ian Paice, Jim Keltner [probably the best session drummer in the states and least known] and maybe even Carmine Appice, Larry Mullen Jr, Phil Rudd [ACDC]

I can't argue "best" because there are different styles, I was blown away watching Collins & Thompson playing "Dance on a Volcano" live, ditto watching Zak Starkey with The Who, Steward Copeland on "Message in a Bottle".

I grew out of Rush's music, but Peart - a great drummer but "the best"?
Vinnie Colaiuta has the broadest pedigree at the highest standards than just about any drummer. From Zappa to heavy metal,to jazz to pop he's done it all and to extremely high standards. Peart, while good at what he did, was a bit of a one trick pony, he was hopeless at jazz as an example.
 
Vinnie Colaiuta has the broadest pedigree at the highest standards than just about any drummer. From Zappa to heavy metal,to jazz to pop he's done it all and to extremely high standards. Peart, while good at what he did, was a bit of a one trick pony, he was hopeless at jazz as an example.
What a load of bollocks.

What you mean jazz like this..


They released nineteen studio albums, with ten exceeding a million copies sold in the United States. Billboard ranks the band third for the "most consecutive gold or platinum albums by a rock band."[A] Early in his career, Peart's performance style was deeply rooted in hard rock. He drew most of his inspiration from drummers such as Keith Moon, Ginger Baker and John Bonham, players who were at the forefront of the British hard rock scene.[6][7] As time passed, he began to emulate jazz and big band musicians Gene Krupa and Buddy Rich. In 1994, Peart became a friend and pupil of jazz instructor Freddie Gruber.[8][9] It was during this time that Peart decided to revamp his playing style by incorporating jazz and swing components.[7]

In 1992, Peart was invited by Buddy Rich's daughter, Cathy Rich, to play at the Buddy Rich Memorial Scholarship Concert in New York City. Peart accepted and performed for the first time with the Buddy Rich Big Band. Peart remarked that he had little time to rehearse, and noted that he was embarrassed to find the band played a different arrangement of the song than the one he had learned.[28] Feeling that his performance left much to be desired, Peart decided to produce and play on two Buddy Rich tribute albums titled Burning for Buddy: A Tribute to the Music of Buddy Rich in 1994 and 1997 in order to regain his aplomb.

While producing the first Buddy Rich tribute album, Peart was struck by the tremendous improvement in ex-Journey drummer Steve Smith's playing, and asked him his "secret." Smith responded he had been studying with drum teacher Freddie Gruber.[29]

In early 2007, Peart and Cathy Rich again began discussing yet another Buddy tribute concert. At the recommendation of bassist Jeff Berlin, Peart decided to once again augment his swing style with formal drum lessons, this time under the tutelage of another pupil of Freddie Gruber, Peter Erskine, himself an instructor of Steve Smith.[28] On October 18, 2008, Peart once again performed at the Buddy Rich Memorial Concert at New York's Hammerstein Ballroom.[30] The concert has since been released on DVD.
One trick pony!
He didn't need other artists to tell him what to play for his keep, session musicians are very good at being told what to play, trapped in the mire of another artist's composition.

Neal wrote his own compositions, often laying out beats to follow the lyrics of a song, or writing his own drum and lyrics tracks side by side.

Youtube is full of drum isolation tracks, here is one of Neal's...live, when your knackered!

 
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