Rioting in Creggan, Londonderry.

In fairness there is a glorification of evilt terror acts sponsored by whole communities. Killycomain in Portadown is one of them.
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Also one in East Belfast opposite city airport. They even associate this one with A Parachute Regiment flag. Its only when the world reacts with total disgust at the actions of these evil people that failure to see them as equals can be achieved. Sadly even branches of the RBL in Belfast continue to give their support. You can hardly blame Blair and Corbyn for supporting the others.
 
In fairness there is a glorification of evilt terror acts sponsored by whole communities. Killycomain in Portadown is one of them.View attachment 450189View attachment 450190
Also one in East Belfast opposite city airport. They even associate this one with A Parachute Regiment flag. Its only when the world reacts with total disgust at the actions of these evil people that failure to see them as equals can be achieved. Sadly even branches of the RBL in Belfast continue to give their support. You can hardly blame Blair and Corbyn for supporting the others.
I’d take issue with your notion that physical representation of these terror campaigns is sponsored or supported by whole communities. Granted a large enough element within said communities certainly support (to varying degrees ) or are at least ambivalent to such murals. I’d suggest though the majority of people, be they in Creggan or Castlereagh would rather have the parasites and vermin off their backs. Unfortunately the very real consequences which exist for criticising or disagreeing with said “artwork” is why little is said openly against them. I was born and bred within what would be described as a loyalist/unionist, working class community. The vast majority of family, friends still hail from this background. At this stage in my life I’ve also a fair number of good, close friends within the other tradition. I can guarantee you most, if not all from either side are more concerned with getting on with their lives and trying to do their best for their kids. If there’s to be a mural on a wall in their area they’d much rather it had no paramilitary connotations. I’d point to how well recent “reimaginings” of wall murals have been received. Off the top of my head, a Titanic mural in east Belfast. George Best in Portadown. Irish regiment capbadges in North Belfast. Just some I’ve seen in recent years. My understanding is that these were, and have been welcomed by the community as an improvement on what they replaced.
 
A fair few of that particular group found themselves, dead, jailed or massively reliant on drink and or drugs.
One of those being an old friend of Gerry Adams(despite him never being a member of PIRA) masterminded city centre bombing campaigns and ended up feeling betrayed by Adams and the peace process.

And said so publicly. Adams didn’t appear at the funeral, lamenting the fact that his old friend had been in a very dark place with mental issues.

Not the sort of thing many ex PIRA leaders would want as an epitaph, yet surprisingly common.
I think you mean Brendan Hughes.
His testimony to the Boston Project was particularly eloquent (and troubling for Jarry)
 
In fairness there is a glorification of evilt terror acts sponsored by whole communities. Killycomain in Portadown is one of them.View attachment 450189View attachment 450190
Also one in East Belfast opposite city airport. They even associate this one with A Parachute Regiment flag. Its only when the world reacts with total disgust at the actions of these evil people that failure to see them as equals can be achieved. Sadly even branches of the RBL in Belfast continue to give their support. You can hardly blame Blair and Corbyn for supporting the others.
I feel a combination of revulsion and embarrassment when I see these tossers appropriate 1st July 1916 (where I lost a family member, another dying of wounds in 1923).
 
I’d take issue with your notion that physical representation of these terror campaigns is sponsored or supported by whole communities. Granted a large enough element within said communities certainly support (to varying degrees ) or are at least ambivalent to such murals. I’d suggest though the majority of people, be they in Creggan or Castlereagh would rather have the parasites and vermin off their backs. Unfortunately the very real consequences which exist for criticising or disagreeing with said “artwork” is why little is said openly against them. I was born and bred within what would be described as a loyalist/unionist, working class community. The vast majority of family, friends still hail from this background. At this stage in my life I’ve also a fair number of good, close friends within the other tradition. I can guarantee you most, if not all from either side are more concerned with getting on with their lives and trying to do their best for their kids. If there’s to be a mural on a wall in their area they’d much rather it had no paramilitary connotations. I’d point to how well recent “reimaginings” of wall murals have been received. Off the top of my head, a Titanic mural in east Belfast. George Best in Portadown. Irish regiment capbadges in North Belfast. Just some I’ve seen in recent years. My understanding is that these were, and have been welcomed by the community as an improvement on what they replaced.
Spot on re the intimidation.
I drove four blokes from the Shankill round Somme and Ypres a few years ago.
They were unanimous in their hatred of the paramilitaries - “community workers, leaches on the community more like” said the youngest.
 
I’d take issue with your notion that physical representation of these terror campaigns is sponsored or supported by whole communities. Granted a large enough element within said communities certainly support (to varying degrees ) or are at least ambivalent to such murals. I’d suggest though the majority of people, be they in Creggan or Castlereagh would rather have the parasites and vermin off their backs. Unfortunately the very real consequences which exist for criticising or disagreeing with said “artwork” is why little is said openly against them. I was born and bred within what would be described as a loyalist/unionist, working class community. The vast majority of family, friends still hail from this background. At this stage in my life I’ve also a fair number of good, close friends within the other tradition. I can guarantee you most, if not all from either side are more concerned with getting on with their lives and trying to do their best for their kids. If there’s to be a mural on a wall in their area they’d much rather it had no paramilitary connotations. I’d point to how well recent “reimaginings” of wall murals have been received. Off the top of my head, a Titanic mural in east Belfast. George Best in Portadown. Irish regiment capbadges in North Belfast. Just some I’ve seen in recent years. My understanding is that these were, and have been welcomed by the community as an improvement on what they replaced.
I grew up in Killycomain, I still have a "Portydowan" accent. The first Roman Catholic in my family is my beautiful wife. Many of my decendants fought in the the battle of the somme and other WW1 campaigns. I cannot accept that memorials of this nature can ever be seen as equalisation. PM and call me by all accounts, I know more than you ever will.
 

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LE
Book Reviewer
lp
I feel a combination of revulsion and embarrassment when I see these tossers appropriate 1st July 1916 (where I lost a family member, another dying of wounds in 1923).
We did Ypres, Tyne Cot and ended up at the peace tower with a friends son who is ex plucky belguim SF. He showed me the photos of Hitler at the Menin gate and (against his dads express wishes) the german graves.

Had a pint, made our goodbyes and that night we were hauled out of the crowd and given a wallside seat as the buglers walked in and cranked up.

Both ends of the gate there were minibuses and armed policemen monitoring the crowd.

A recent addition to the proceedings
None of us could adequately explain the sashes

And no they werent worn going over the top. They may have been worn under the tunic, brought out while lying wounded in a shell hole. But worn in the line before going over the top. Didn't happen.
 
lp


We did Ypres, Tyne Cot and ended up at the peace tower with a friends son who is ex plucky belguim SF. He showed me the photos of Hitler at the Menin gate and (against his dads express wishes) the german graves.

Had a pint, made our goodbyes and that night we were hauled out of the crowd and given a wallside seat as the buglers walked in and cranked up.

Both ends of the gate there were minibuses and armed policemen monitoring the crowd.

A recent addition to the proceedings
None of us could adequately explain the sashes

And no they werent worn going over the top. They may have been worn under the tunic, brought out while lying wounded in a shell hole. But worn in the line before going over the top. Didn't happen.
Yup, a myth
 
I grew up in Killycomain, I still have a "Portydowan" accent. The first Roman Catholic in my family is my beautiful wife. Many of my decendants fought in the the battle of the somme and other WW1 campaigns. I cannot accept that memorials of this nature can ever be seen as equalisation. PM and call me by all accounts, I know more than you ever will.
We played rugby against Killycomain and Clounagh !
 
I grew up in Killycomain, I still have a "Portydowan" accent. The first Roman Catholic in my family is my beautiful wife. Many of my decendants fought in the the battle of the somme and other WW1 campaigns. I cannot accept that memorials of this nature can ever be seen as equalisation. PM and call me by all accounts, I know more than you ever will.
You’ve the completely wrong end of the stick. I make no mention of such murals representing any form of equalisation, as you put it. I was merely disagreeing with your assertion that whole communities effectively stand over and support displays of paramilitary “artwork” within their area. As for your last line, you know more than I’ll ever know. Really? Good for you.
 
I’d take issue with your notion that physical representation of these terror campaigns is sponsored or supported by whole communities. Granted a large enough element within said communities certainly support (to varying degrees ) or are at least ambivalent to such murals. I’d suggest though the majority of people, be they in Creggan or Castlereagh would rather have the parasites and vermin off their backs. Unfortunately the very real consequences which exist for criticising or disagreeing with said “artwork” is why little is said openly against them. I was born and bred within what would be described as a loyalist/unionist, working class community. The vast majority of family, friends still hail from this background. At this stage in my life I’ve also a fair number of good, close friends within the other tradition. I can guarantee you most, if not all from either side are more concerned with getting on with their lives and trying to do their best for their kids. If there’s to be a mural on a wall in their area they’d much rather it had no paramilitary connotations. I’d point to how well recent “reimaginings” of wall murals have been received. Off the top of my head, a Titanic mural in east Belfast. George Best in Portadown. Irish regiment capbadges in North Belfast. Just some I’ve seen in recent years. My understanding is that these were, and have been welcomed by the community as an improvement on what they replaced.

One wall mural that I like is this mural in Derry:

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I love the show, really funny. I do wish they had added Sister Michael to the mural. She has a really funny character.
 
There's a brilliant mural that went up in Ballyclare the past week of local members of the armed forces that fought in WW2.

I'll have to find it.
 
Had a pint, made our goodbyes and that night we were hauled out of the crowd and given a wallside seat as the buglers walked in and cranked up.

Both ends of the gate there were minibuses and armed policemen monitoring the crowd.

A recent addition to the proceedings
None of us could adequately explain the sashes
I had the privilege of watching the Menin Gate ceremony just after the 2018 Centenary and the usual armed police / riot vans that would be expected were noticeably absent.

Armed coppers may be a recent addition but I hope it is not routine - to walk towards the floodlit gate unencumbered by anything but a sense of loss is a moving experience.
 
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The recent mural in Ballyclare.
 
I had the privilege of watching the Menin Gate ceremony just after the 2018 Centenary and the usual armed police / riot vans that would be expected were noticeably absent.

Armed coppers may be a recent addition but I hope it is not routine - to walk towards the floodlit gate unencumbered by anything but a sense of loss is a moving experience.
Its awe inspiring that wee town. The view from the Cloth Hall over the Menin Gate, just gets you thinking about the 100's of thousands who walked the old Menin Road to the frontlines.
 
Its awe inspiring that wee town. The view from the Cloth Hall over the Menin Gate, just gets you thinking about the 100's of thousands who walked the old Menin Road to the frontlines.
Indeed.

The only places I shed a tear were the Devonshire trench after reading the memorial stone and at Thiepval after I realised just how ******* big it is. I was fine until I rounded the treeline and saw it was 2, 3, I stopped counting storeys high.
 
Indeed.

The only places I shed a tear were the Devonshire trench after reading the memorial stone and at Thiepval after I realised just how ******* big it is. I was fine until I rounded the treeline and saw it was 2, 3, I stopped counting storeys high.
Connaught Cemetery at Thiepval Wood got me. Menin Gate service at night, had a lump in my throat.
 

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