Rilfe, L32A1

I am an german collector and autor, looking for anny info about an rifle i just bought.
It is an FN-Browning Shotgun Auto5 in caliber 12, proofed 1964, known as the L32A1 in british nomenclature.
It would be great to get any infos, also links, manuals pics or so on.








 

4(T)

LE
IIRC these were originally procured for the Malayan Emergency, but stayed in service and were used in Borneo, Kenya, NI.
 
We used the Browning Auto 5 within EOD.

It was sawn down, butt and barrel. This was then placed in a specially manufactured metal plate that contained a solenoid. This was then mounted under the Weapons on a Mk 8 Wheelbarrow.

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The Shotgun was mounted on its side with the cocking handle and ejection port facing downwards.

The cartridges available to us were SG, No6 and Solid shot. It could hold 4 rounds in an internal magazine and one in the chamber Load four, cock, load 5th. This was important to remember because if using a mix of SG and No6 shít, you had to remember the firing sequence - 4, 5, 3, 2, 1.

Solid shot could not be mixed with SG or No6. The shotgun had to be set up differently. The hand guard is removed, revealing a large spring and two rings with bevelled edges. The arrangement of the bevelled rings is changed when firing solid shot.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
IIRC these were originally procured for the Malayan Emergency, but stayed in service and were used in Borneo, Kenya, NI.
We also had a couple at Kellys Garden in 1985, good for thinning the bunnies
 

4(T)

LE
Yes, i have seen them, but they had an longer barrel. Also i dont know if they are marked with "RMP"?

The shotguns would have been originally purchased as a one-off cash buy for operational use ("urgent operational requirement/ UOR"), rather than as a planned military procurement (e.g. like a machine gun). Therefore there would have been no fixed military specification - they'd just buy whichever guns the supplier had in stock, and of course sporting guns have lots of barrel and choke options.

Later, because the shotgun received its L32A1 designation, it'd be an approved "cash purchase" for other military requirements. I'm guessing, therefore, that there were several batches of these guns bought between 1960 and 1980(?).

As yours is marked to a specific purpose - Royal Military Police - its likely that there was a specific requirement for a shorter barrel, and they had time to order a special batch from the supplier. I expect that the majority of these guns in store (if they still exist) have no unit marks and are of several standard commercial barrel lengths.

I'm fairly sure that I've seen specimens in-service with short (24"?) and long (30"?) barrels.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
In NI we had Rem 870's
 

4(T)

LE
We also had a couple at Kellys Garden in 1985, good for thinning the bunnies
You must have been there the same time as me - albeit I was over the water at Ajax Bay. We used 7.62mm on our bunnies. Now you mention it, I do recall that there were Browning A5s at Kelly, because the mess there tried to have a clay pigeon shoot - using the boys to throw NAAFI plates because there was no trap...
 
You must have been there the same time as me - albeit I was over the water at Ajax Bay. We used 7.62mm on our bunnies. Now you mention it, I do recall that there were Browning A5s at Kelly, because the mess there tried to have a clay pigeon shoot - using the boys to throw NAAFI plates because there was no trap...
At Fanning Head we used 7.62 FN, and 66mm on the bunnies, the sheep, the geese, on anything that moved really.
 
As yours is marked to a specific purpose - Royal Military Police - its likely that there was a specific requirement for a shorter barrel,
It’s unusual to mark them as such. Ours were never marked EOD, but it was known as the EOD shotgun.
 
A5`s are dam good shotguns , built to last , my oldest is 1929 and spot on.
 

4(T)

LE
It’s unusual to mark them as such. Ours were never marked EOD, but it was known as the EOD shotgun.

I was wondering if these were marked "RMP" because of a specific situation task where RMP were working alongside civpol who had exactly the same gun. Possibly Kenya or Malaya.

IIRC the old Colonial Office was responsible for arming colonial police and militias, and it used to buy those weapons from the War Office/MoS. Possibly the WO knew that their guns and the CO's identical guns were all heading for the same theatre, and wanted to make damn sure nothing went walkies..
 
Looks very much like the shotgun that we used on the Bird Control Unit. However that was 30 years ago, memory fade etc.
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
The leading scout carried these in Borneo, he changed over every so many hundred metres, and handed the weapon to the next in line. I seem to remember that either the pump action carried nine rounds or the cartridge was loaded with nine lead balls. Someone please correct me.
I have one now which is Enfield and marked WD but single shot.
 

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