Rifles Hot or Not - Show us yer kit!

Not exactly my kit however my youngest son is well pleased with his Tikka T3 (.308).
He is a much better marksman than I (not sure whether I'm disappointed or proud).
View attachment 435112View attachment 435113
Nice group, but at what range?
Quick bit of analysis, BDS tgt so you're somewhere in Germany? And that looks like a mock Ansitz as used for hunter training. Saw something almost identical at my local range when a load of u/t hunters turned up around 2 weeks ago.
 
Two months ago I finally got to shoot my AK-74, shown here. https://www.arrse.co.uk/community/threads/rifles-hot-or-not-show-us-yer-kit.105676/post-7844177
Yes, that was over two years ago. I don't go out shooting much, recently.

Since I moved away from California (Which means I have to consider changing my name), I am no longer subject to California firearms laws. California, of course, has a ban on 'assault weapons'. AKA Evil Black Rifles.

To show you how sensible this law is, I have made this video. When I start, the rifle is not an evil weapon of mass destruction, and Californians are safe. When I end, it's in 'Free State Configuration." Which, I'm serious, is the name of the service my Tavor is going through right now from the factory, it'll be back in my hands next week.

 

ugly

LE
Moderator
I get the pistol calibre rifle as an idea, I just think 9mm is a bit poo
 

Zulu95

Swinger
It is dictated by what is readily available to do the mods. 9mm is the most popular and consequently cheapest to build and shoot.
 

Zulu95

Swinger
The red dot is a UTG if I remember. I bet it came off the same production line. The other is a Vortex Spitfire 1X. I really like the Vortex with the etched glass reticle. It is mounted on an American Defense Quick Detach mount.
 
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The red dot is a UTG if I remember. I bet it came off the same production line. The other is a Vortex Spitfire 1X. I really like the Vortex with the etched glass reticle. It is mounted on an American Defense Quick Detach mount.
I have a TRS that just died after 18 months and a holosun that keeps on trucking...I think I might check out the Sig Romeo next ( although red dots seems to exaggerate a very slight astigmatism I have).
 

Zulu95

Swinger
That's why I love the Spitfire. My astigmatisms do not effect it at all. Then I like the dot/donut type sight picture anyway.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
It is dictated by what is readily available to do the mods. 9mm is the most popular and consequently cheapest to build and shoot.
I get that
 

Boxer96

Old-Salt
Nice group, but at what range

100m

Quick bit of analysis, BDS tgt so you're somewhere in Germany? And that looks like a mock Ansitz as used for hunter training. Saw something almost identical at my local range when a load of u/t hunters turned up around 2 weeks ago.
Drilligaf; I’m in a small village in the Bayerwald, my son in München.
Well spotted on the Schießstand. It’s the range at Bad Abbach.
 

HE117

LE
I have been busy in the Bat Cave for the last couple of weeks, finishing off my Ferguson and doing a restoration job on a little Winchester 06, of which more later..

As a precursor to this. I am posting this video by Mark Novak, a US gunsmith for whom I have the greatest respect. I am in 100% agreement with his approach and advice regarding the maintenance and conservation of old firearms. If you have a Purdey or Boss that needs servicing, then send them back to the manufacturer. If you have two left hands and use a chisel as a screwdriver, find someone competent to maintain your guns, otherwise follow the advice in this video.. it is all good stuff! DO THE MAINTENANCE!

 

HE117

LE
OK, as promised, here is my bit on the restoration of a Winchester 1906 pump gallery gun..

She was in a bit of a sorry state, chocolate brown all over and the stock looked like someone had been knocking nails in with it. The barrel and action got the boiling and steaming treatment which I have described before, which turned the brown (mostly) back into blue.. the top side of the barrel had been scrubbed down to bright metal, so I gave it a few passes through a rust brown cycle and then steamed it again which darkened down the worn areas, but without losing the appearance of age..

The woodwork was well bashed and gouged and there was not much left of the wood finish. What was rather more serious was a crack in the toe of the stock, which would have to be dealt with. In many cases this is the result of a poorly made stock, with the grain parallel along the top of the stock leaving the toe having the grain running short across the tip of the toe, resulting in it shearing off. Ideally the grain should run parallel with the bottom of the stock so that the grain runs in line with the toe. This was actually the case here, but there was a nasty crack running parallel with the grain..
butt1.jpg


Ok I can glue this together, however without splitting the stock to get to the root of the crack, I am not going to be able to get the glue all the way down. Also we need to address the cause of the failure, rather than just cover up the result. A solution to this problem is to do a "dog bone" repair..
butt2.jpg


Having removed the butt plate (using the correct screwdriver!) you can see the crack running across the toe. I have pencilled in the proposed dog bone repair which will bind the two sides of the crack together.
butt3.jpg

Here you see where I have drilled two short holes above and below the crack to take the ends of the dog bone. I always use a hand drill for this type of work as you need to go slow and only remove the minimum amount of wood...
butt4.jpg

Sorry for the poor focus here, but you can see where I have chiselled out a groove between the two holes to insert the dog bone. which is just a bit of bar with the ends squeezed flat in the vice. Mark Novak just cuts a straight mortice here, but I think producing a proper dog bone hole is better as you get some mechanical grip across the joint..

.
butt5.jpg


...and now we fill in the dog bone cavity and the crack with Acraglas. Novak suggests always colouring this black as grain in wood is alway black and the repair is easier to hide. I agree... whatever you do, do not use clear or white adhesive as it stands out regardless of how thin the crack is. Don't try to scrape off the flash at this point, resin which has not been forced into the surrounding grain is easier to remove...

tube.jpg


To hold the repair together while it sets, but not leave any marks, you cannot beat surgical tubing (unless you have a pet squid!) You can get it from Brownells and it lasts forever as the resin does not stick to it.

butt6.jpg


Here is the stock after the tubing has come off.. you can knock the flashing off with a (very) sharp chisel.. The stock needed some work and would need to be refinished anyway. I use my Dads old soldering iron, heated on the gas ring and a damp cloth to steam out the dents and dings. There are some that are past redemption and could have been plugged, but I just left them as part of the gun's history. I then rubbed down the stock with 320 and 600 grit paper, finally feathering it off with a damp cloth and a heat gun.

I use the "trade secrets" range of stock treatments as I find they are less shiny than tru oil and quicker than boiled linseed. The stock was pretty dry and took five coats of rapid oil after grain sealing. I stopped there and let it harden to a nice satin finish, which did not cover the marks of age, but halted the deterioration...

finished.jpg


I doubt if she would win any prizes for accuracy, but she is great fun to shoot and will hopefully survive another 100 years...!
 
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OK, as promised, here is my bit on the restoration of a Winchester 1906 pump gallery gun..

She was in a bit of a sorry state, chocolate brown all over and the stock looked like someone had been knocking nails in with it. The barrel and action got the boiling and steaming treatment which I have described before, which turned the brown (mostly) back into blue.. the top side of the barrel had been scrubbed down to bright metal, so I gave it a few passes through a rust brown cycle and then steamed it again which darkened down the worn areas, but without losing the appearance of age..

The woodwork was well bashed and gouged and there was not much left of the wood finish. What was rather more serious was a crack in the toe of the stock, which would have to be dealt with. In many cases this is the result of a poorly made stock, with the grain parallel along the top of the stock leaving the toe having the grain running short across the tip of the toe, resulting in it shearing off. Ideally the grain should run parallel with the bottom of the stock so that the grain runs in line with the toe. This was actually the case here, but there was a nasty crack running parallel with the grain..
View attachment 435323

Ok I can glue this together, however without splitting the stock to get to the root of the crack, I am not going to be able to get the glue all the way down. Also we need to address the cause of the failure, rather than just cover up the result. A solution to this problem is to do a "dog bone" repair..
View attachment 435325

Having removed the butt plate (using the correct screwdriver!) you can see the crack running across the toe. I have pencilled in the proposed dog bone repair which will bind the two sides of the crack together.
View attachment 435326
Here you see where I have drilled two short holes above and below the crack to take the ends of the dog bone. I always use a hand drill for this type of work as you need to go slow and only remove the minimum amount of wood...
View attachment 435328
Sorry for the poor focus here, but you can see where I have chiselled out a groove between the two holes to insert the dog bone. which is just a bit of bar with the ends squeezed flat in the vice. Mark Novak just cuts a straight mortice here, but I think producing a proper dog bone hole is better as you get some mechanical grip across the joint..

.View attachment 435329

...and now we fill in the dog bone cavity and the crack with Acraglas. Novak suggests always colouring this black as grain in wood is alway black and the repair is easier to hide. I agree... whatever you do, do not use clear or white adhesive as it stands out regardless of how thin the crack is. Don't try to scrape off the flash at this point, resin which has not been forced into the surrounding grain is easier to remove...

View attachment 435331

To hold the repair together while it sets, but not leave any marks, you cannot beat surgical tubing (unless you have a pet squid!) You can get it from Brownells and it lasts forever as the resin does not stick to it.

View attachment 435332

Here is the stock after the tubing has come off.. you can knock the flashing off with a (very) sharp chisel.. The stock needed some work and would need to be refinished anyway. I use my Dads old soldering iron, heated on the gas ring and a damp cloth to steam out the dents and dings. There are some that are past redemption and could have been plugged, but I just left them as part of the gun;s history. I then rubbed down the stock with 320 and 600 grit paper, finally feathering it off with a damp cloth and a heat gun.

I use the "trade secrets" range of stock treatments as I find they are less shiny than tru oil and quicker than boiled linseed. The stock was pretty dry and took five coats of rapid oil after grain sealing. I stopped there and let it harden to a nice satin finish, which did not cover the marks of age, but halted the deterioration...

View attachment 435333

I doubt if she would win any prizes for accuracy, but she is great fun to shoot and will hopefully survive another 100 years...!
Cracking job, well done,
 
I own something like it, .22 black power percussion cap. And one I want to get rid of,
 

HE117

LE
The Winchester Model 06 is one of the many designs by John Moses Browning. It is a .22RF pump action rifle, and was similar to the slightly more expensive Model 1890 model, which had an octagonal barrel and a curved butt plate..!

They were manufactured from 1906 to 1936 and many, many thousands were produced. They were the mainstay of the fairground trade and were originally produced in .22 short only. Later on they were chambered for long and long rifle, but would shoot any combination. There were three variations, mine is a standard model. The 06 was replaced by the Model 62 in 1936.

You will see that mine has an after market tang sight by A J Parker. This would indicate that it had not fallen into the maw of the fairground community. From what I was told, the UK fairground shooting galleries were all owned by one family in the post war period. The Family Matriarch used to go round gun shops buying up any 1890s, 06 and Model 62s she could find. As a result, despite the numbers that must have come into UK, there are not that many survivors.

At some point in history, my rifle has been "Parkerifled". This was a reboring method carried out by Parkers. The rifling is pretty pitted, but it seems to shoot OK.. I may rebore it again as I can get rifled tubes via Brownells.

It has a sliding block and an exposed hammer...

open.jpg


A typical Browning design, with fantastic multiple use of parts and held together with a couple of screws and a pin. The gun is tiny, 36" overall with a 20" barrel..

open2.jpg
 
Well

07FE4D4F-0D41-4C7F-BA52-E9E34A6B87CA.jpeg


first outing and

6E258190-8134-4426-B9BB-FDC5F50CF016.jpeg


fine tuning before anyone starts.....

and yes it works!
 
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