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Ridiculous shit installed in new cars ...

jmb3296

War Hero
Golf GT TDI. Low tyre pressure warning display and Red warning symbol. Nothing wrong with that good safety system. All tyres checked rear offside slightly low so inflated to correct pressure. Warning displays still on. I know all pressures are correct so I drive it for a couple of days . Warnings still on. So I check all tyres again, all are correct. Out comes the handbook. Instruction : go into infotainment system, select CAR, scroll to tyres, select squiggly symbol. Choice tyre pressure correct select OK. Bingo warning goes off.
Why the **** if the system knows when they are low does it not reset itself once they have been inflated to the correct pressure.

To be fair, the tyre pressure warning systems is one thing on both cars I really appreciate and have “ used” on a hire car it was a great help as I got tyre depressurisation on a motorway.
But. Why on Earth is it always such a total pain in the posterior to reset.
 
Why the **** if the system knows when they are low does it not reset itself once they have been inflated to the correct pressure.

Depends on whether it's a pressure sensor system or using the ABS/Traction control to determine a wheel is rotating more/less than expected (and thus may be under pressure).
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
To be fair, the tyre pressure warning systems is one thing on both cars I really appreciate and have “ used” on a hire car it was a great help as I got tyre depressurisation on a motorway.
But. Why on Earth is it always such a total pain in the posterior to reset.
My pretty basic Corsa has a Reset button on the end of the left-hand stalk.
 
I borrowed an Audi a few days ago. A light on the wing mirror flashes when someone overtakes. I had to look in the manual for a reason as it was new to me.As driver should I not be aware of cars around me without yet another flashing light to distract me?
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
I borrowed an Audi a few days ago. A light on the wing mirror flashes when someone overtakes. I had to look in the manual for a reason as it was new to me.As driver should I not be aware of cars around me without yet another flashing light to distract me?
It's 'blind spot detection' - but it does raise another couple of points if I may...
1. You were in an Audi - and you expect us to believe you allowed yourself to be overtaken?
2. It was a flashing light, why did you not follow the correct procedure and drive immediately to the dealers and complain that there was a warning light on, you experienced loss of power, increased fuel consumption and want immediate compensation for the distress, inconvenience and time spent not reading the manual.
 
I borrowed an Audi a few days ago. A light on the wing mirror flashes when someone overtakes. I had to look in the manual for a reason as it was new to me.As driver should I not be aware of cars around me without yet another flashing light to distract me?

Those blind spot warning lights are quite good. Especially when you get two roads or motorways merging and the bloke on the inside comes up faster. Same with the one on the outside, sometimes the cars have large blindspots (in mine quite large as the passenger headrest is bloody massive).
You get the warning light and, if you indicate to pull out or in to a lane and there's a car there then the warning beep goes off.

That and the one that beeps when there's a car coming and I'm in reverse. Can be bloody difficult to see round the mahoosive SUV with blacked out windows or the white van man who's parked next to you*. About the only two things I actually find a use for.

*And that's another thing. How come I've got this huge magnet that attracts other cars to me? I can park in a wide open car park with loads of spaces and have an empty space either side yet, when I come out, there's always someone parked right next to me despite there still being loads of empty spaces.
 

wheel

LE
Those blind spot warning lights are quite good. Especially when you get two roads or motorways merging and the bloke on the inside comes up faster. Same with the one on the outside, sometimes the cars have large blindspots (in mine quite large as the passenger headrest is bloody massive).
You get the warning light and, if you indicate to pull out or in to a lane and there's a car there then the warning beep goes off.

That and the one that beeps when there's a car coming and I'm in reverse. Can be bloody difficult to see round the mahoosive SUV with blacked out windows or the white van man who's parked next to you*. About the only two things I actually find a use for.

*And that's another thing. How come I've got this huge magnet that attracts other cars to me? I can park in a wide open car park with loads of spaces and have an empty space either side yet, when I come out, there's always someone parked right next to me despite there still being loads of empty spaces.
That is a problem for Audi drivers as they never use the indicators.
 
Golf GT TDI. Low tyre pressure warning display and Red warning symbol. Nothing wrong with that good safety system. All tyres checked rear offside slightly low so inflated to correct pressure. Warning displays still on. I know all pressures are correct so I drive it for a couple of days . Warnings still on. So I check all tyres again, all are correct. Out comes the handbook. Instruction : go into infotainment system, select CAR, scroll to tyres, select squiggly symbol. Choice tyre pressure correct select OK. Bingo warning goes off.
Why the **** if the system knows when they are low does it not reset itself once they have been inflated to the correct pressure.
It's a 'dumb' system. It doesn't actually know what the tyre pressure is, only that it is less than the last time it was reset when it comes on. Your car has varying pressures your tyres can be set to depending on the number of people generally carried or loads. You choose your pressure to suit what your requirements are and then set it, it will then alarm when there is a drop of a set amount from the set pressure. These monitors don't tend to measure pressure but the 'roundness' of the tyre so it needs to be zeroed each time you go past the maximum deflation it has set. if you massively overinflate or underinflate the tyre and set it, it will work from that point it doesn't know what pressure you set it to.
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
That is a problem for Audi drivers as they never use the indicators.
Some Audi's have 'lane drift detection / lane keeping assist' or whatever their special name is for it. I know the Master Tech. at the local Audi dealers, he was telling me a while ago that 'many, if not most' of the vehicles with it fitted are brought in for steering concerns (the electric assist on the steering rack applies positive pressure to keep in lane unless the indicators are used), most are given a test drive to confirm everything works as expected and the driver is told that it is normal behaviour if the indicators are not used..... there's been several drivers 'demanding' that the feature is turned off...
 
Oh, so it comes with a complete dick behind the wheel then?

Who the fück are you?

Get some time in and wait your turn. theres far more people in the queue before you to abuse me.
 
Some Audi's have 'lane drift detection / lane keeping assist' or whatever their special name is for it. I know the Master Tech. at the local Audi dealers, he was telling me a while ago that 'many, if not most' of the vehicles with it fitted are brought in for steering concerns (the electric assist on the steering rack applies positive pressure to keep in lane unless the indicators are used), most are given a test drive to confirm everything works as expected and the driver is told that it is normal behaviour if the indicators are not used..... there's been several drivers 'demanding' that the feature is turned off...
I hired a Holden Arcadia, a rebadged Buick SUV that did that; the tug on the steering wheel was quite disconcerting. The thing also had vibrating seats; drift to the left and the left side of the seat squab vibrates, right and the right side does.

It’s just about tolerable on a motorway, but on a long drive on a single carriageway road it’s a real pain, constantly trying to tug you to the centre of your half of the road. And every time you cut towards an apex it vibrates and tugs. Horrible.

The revolting piece of dung also had road sign recognition with speed limiting. Apparently the car hire companies have them locked so you can’t override them. Who said hire cars are the fastest cars in the world?
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
I hired a Holden Arcadia, a rebadged Buick SUV that did that; the tug on the steering wheel was quite disconcerting. The thing also had vibrating seats; drift to the left and the left side of the seat squab vibrates, right and the right side does.

It’s just about tolerable on a motorway, but on a long drive on a single carriageway road it’s a real pain, constantly trying to tug you to the centre of your half of the road. And every time you cut towards an apex it vibrates and tugs. Horrible.

The revolting piece of dung also had road sign recognition with speed limiting. Apparently the car hire companies have them locked so you can’t override them. Who said hire cars are the fastest cars in the world?
A bit of black & nasty over the camera(s) sorts most things.... unless it's a real smart@rrse one that uses a speed limit database with GPS referencing.
 

Ex_crab

Old-Salt
In modern day cars, in each wheel hub there is a thing called a phonic wheel velodyne. It's a toothed wheel rotating in a magnetic field and it generates an AC voltage. The frequency is proportional to the wheel rotation and is mainly used in the ABS, traction control and tyre pressure monitoring.
An ECU monitors the frequency and if it senses that you have applied the the brakes and that one or more of the wheel frequencies stops, it assumes wheel lock and releases the brake pressure. Once the wheel moves again it re-applies the brake pressure and so on, allowing you to brake and steer on slippery surfaces.
Traction control works the other way. If one of the driven wheel frequencies suddenly increases, the ECU assumes wheel spin and applies the drive to the other wheel.
Tyre pressure monitoring is a bit different. As others have said, once you have inflated your tyres to the correct pressure you set the system and the ECU takes that as the start point. If you have a leak, the bad tyre will get smaller and the circumference of the faulty wheel will decrease causing it to spin faster compared to the others. When the faulty wheel frequency increases to a set level you will get a warning so you have to re-inflate the tyre and reset the system.
 
In modern day cars, in each wheel hub there is a thing called a phonic wheel velodyne. It's a toothed wheel rotating in a magnetic field and it generates an AC voltage. The frequency is proportional to the wheel rotation and is mainly used in the ABS, traction control and tyre pressure monitoring.
An ECU monitors the frequency and if it senses that you have applied the the brakes and that one or more of the wheel frequencies stops, it assumes wheel lock and releases the brake pressure. Once the wheel moves again it re-applies the brake pressure and so on, allowing you to brake and steer on slippery surfaces.
Traction control works the other way. If one of the driven wheel frequencies suddenly increases, the ECU assumes wheel spin and applies the drive to the other wheel.
The Harrier and Jaguar anti lock systems, as taught at Halton have just come flooding back. Just needed the Maxeret system for the full syllabus.
RP.
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
In modern day cars, in each wheel hub there is a thing called a phonic wheel velodyne. It's a toothed wheel rotating in a magnetic field and it generates an AC voltage. The frequency is proportional to the wheel rotation and is mainly used in the ABS, traction control and tyre pressure monitoring.
An ECU monitors the frequency and if it senses that you have applied the the brakes and that one or more of the wheel frequencies stops, it assumes wheel lock and releases the brake pressure. Once the wheel moves again it re-applies the brake pressure and so on, allowing you to brake and steer on slippery surfaces.
Traction control works the other way. If one of the driven wheel frequencies suddenly increases, the ECU assumes wheel spin and applies the drive to the other wheel.
Tyre pressure monitoring is a bit different. As others have said, once you have inflated your tyres to the correct pressure you set the system and the ECU takes that as the start point. If you have a leak, the bad tyre will get smaller and the circumference of the faulty wheel will decrease causing it to spin faster compared to the others. When the faulty wheel frequency increases to a set level you will get a warning so you have to re-inflate the tyre and reset the system.
There is also another system with transponders in the wheels which do measure tyre pressure & temperature, however, these also have to be 'taught in' as there is varying pressures for each vehicle model dependent upon load and variant of wheel / tyre fitted. Both systems have their advantages and downsides.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
It's a 'dumb' system. It doesn't actually know what the tyre pressure is, only that it is less than the last time it was reset when it comes on. Your car has varying pressures your tyres can be set to depending on the number of people generally carried or loads. You choose your pressure to suit what your requirements are and then set it, it will then alarm when there is a drop of a set amount from the set pressure. These monitors don't tend to measure pressure but the 'roundness' of the tyre so it needs to be zeroed each time you go past the maximum deflation it has set. if you massively overinflate or underinflate the tyre and set it, it will work from that point it doesn't know what pressure you set it to.
My tyre pressure warning tells me which tyre is low when it drops to 27.
 
Some Audi's have 'lane drift detection / lane keeping assist' or whatever their special name is for it. I know the Master Tech. at the local Audi dealers, he was telling me a while ago that 'many, if not most' of the vehicles with it fitted are brought in for steering concerns (the electric assist on the steering rack applies positive pressure to keep in lane unless the indicators are used), most are given a test drive to confirm everything works as expected and the driver is told that it is normal behaviour if the indicators are not used.... its a . there's been several drivers 'demanding' that the feature is turned off...
Mrs KoRs Jeep has this. Its OK on the motorway, but on A and B roads where you are dodging round potholes etc its a PITA and a distraction.
But there is a nice big button to turn it off.

It also has blindspot detection, which is quite good. a little symbol alerts you to someone lurking there.
Its a passive systems like this which are ok, I don't like intervention.
Mate at work has VW T-Roc R, it has autobraking and keeps triggering at "phantoms".
Its been back to VW and they can't find any issues. Its shit like that I don't need.
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
Mrs KoRs Jeep has this. Its OK on the motorway, but on A and B roads where you are dodging round potholes etc its a PITA and a distraction.
But there is a nice big button to turn it off.

It also has blindspot detection, which is quite good. a little symbol alerts you to someone lurking there.
Its a passive systems like this which are ok, I don't like intervention.
Mate at work has VW T-Roc R, it has autobraking and keeps triggering at "phantoms".
Its been back to VW and they can't find any issues. Its shit like that I don't need.
The autobraking (pre-sense I think they call it) is really worthy of the thread title - unsurprisingly it's common across VAG(e) vehicles and is also a common source of complaints, the biggest problem is direct sunlight, especially in early winter / spring when the sun is low and reflections from shop windows, buses, other cars etc. etc. The system doesn't log any faults because it doesn't see the input as an invalid trigger, so diagnostically, there's nothing to go at, all you can do is look for patterns in the behaviour (time of day, weather, location, direction of travel etc.) and look for correlations in behaviour and triggers. It's a bit like 'false' activations of DAS on the C130's - in some ways you'd rather have false positives but it's feckin' annoying when it happens.
Personally, i'm an advocate of replacing the drivers steering wheel airbag with an ice pick - it'd make everyone a better driver (or dead) in a short amount of time. There are far to many driver 'aids' that people think absolve them of any responsibility for how they drive and the consequences of not doing it with their full attention or to an acceptable standard.
 

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