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Ridiculous shit installed in new cars ...

The battery isolators on Ag kit all have a KAM bypass that keep the vital ECU's on line or at least the memory and configurations ..... you are correct though in that it allows them to be parked for months and not drain battery power but the ECU "handshake" around the CAN takes much less than a minute even after several months and as engine start is now ECU initiated the thing won't start if it's not happy everything is online.... The current Range Rover is very slow to come on line after start and frequently not all of it does.....

A lot of AG kit now has EPL or Electric park brakes .

Don't think on any EPL system car, truck, or AG disconnecting the power releases the EPL ....they are all fail safe hence need power to release....... unlike the wife's old TVR that braked on the rear discs so if she parked it after an enthusiastic drive with hot brakes as the discs cooled so the handbrake would loose grip and off would roll Trevor ;-)

If you look at the value of a low spec tractor new it is more than many high end cars and higher spec farm kit is in mainstream super car price range ....as you say most higher spec farm kit now reports to the factory and dealer / user

You might know the answer to this?

I rent a bit of land off the local farmer and he was spraying something or other on the field out the back of my place the other day. The sprayer didn’t seem to be working evenly so I mentioned this when he pulled up for the usual chat/ brew.

He said it was working perfectly and that the field had been satellite imaged and the data loaded to the sprayer and was hooked into a SatNav so that the amount of shit sprayed matched the amount needed, presumably patchy bits get a bit more?

Is this actually a thing? Is that technically possible?

If so, Wow!
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
You might know the answer to this?

I rent a bit of land off the local farmer and he was spraying something or other on the field out the back of my place the other day. The sprayer didn’t seem to be working evenly so I mentioned this when he pulled up for the usual chat/ brew.

He said it was working perfectly and that the field had been satellite imaged and the data loaded to the sprayer and was hooked into a SatNav so that the amount of shit sprayed matched the amount needed, presumably patchy bits get a bit more?

Is this actually a thing? Is that technically possible?

If so, Wow!
I just walked past the old national HQ of Ordnance Survey to get the paper. The new HQ is a similar distance the other way.

Recently (last year? ), local news reported that OS had been trialling unmanned tractors that could work by GPS to 1cm accuracy.

I reckon what you've described is easy.
 
Same on a Corsa. Luckily, I think Ford, Vauxhall/Opel and VW are all designed by the same people, or else they evolved convergently. Externally there's little to choose in the detail in design of Polo, Fiesta, Corsa, down to things like the small windows between mirror and windscreen. Overall, you can tell them apart, but in detail, get what I'm trying badly to say?

I got into the Corsa from the Polo. Apart from one or two odd switches moved to accommodate a console, all the major switches and stalk controls are the same in general. Yet everything is automatic (and it can all be turned to manual). Getting dark? Lights come on. A few spots of rain? Windscreen wiped once. Downpour? Hard wipe. Need a squirt of screenwash, front or back? Exactly the same. Door mirror controls, essentially identical.

Twist the stalk to increase/decrease intermittent wipe speed. But. How to start an intermittent rest screen wipe? I'd had the car best part of a year before I discovered a rocker switch on the end of the stalk, hidden by the steering wheel.

I actually think my Corsa is pretty much perfect ergonomically for my needs. So of course, They want me to replace it with something electrically driven.

My only gripe. The radio starts automatically when I power up the car. Volume 16 is quite loud. Bluetooth connects to the phone and I can select music from there. But I need volume about 50 to get the same level. Turn the engine off, things switch off. Turn it back on, radio defaults until the phone connects. At volume 50. I'm beginning to learn to reduce the volume before I switch off. And when I do forget, I'm learning not to slap Zero Alpha to stop her mashing every control on the console to turn it down, and everything else the console does. Also helps if I haven't parked briefly with a half turn on the steering wheel, so the volume down control is LHS of the wheel and up, not RHS and down. All the while, Wave105 is bursting eardrums.

Seems that 12-18 months is about average for sorting out intermittent wipe!

The radio thing you can adjust the “start” volume. Don’t ask me how, I found it whilst looking up how to turn in intermittent wipe, under “contact details of all family members of the bloke that installed the wheel nuts”.

More seriously, the volume when using your phone via Bluetooth in the car is controlled by both the volume setting in your car and the one on your phone (or it is in my car anyway). It could be your phone volume is turned down so you have to correspondingly increase tge car volume setting?
 
In exchange for that gem, can anyone tell me how to use the SatNav?
Talk to it.

The OEM garbage on my Landrover takes an age to type stuff in to and then talks to ,e in a daft, posh english voice. But use Apple CarPlay and voila. Press button on watch, ask Siri for directions and off we go.

Reminds me of my first car with a Satnav screen. A Renault Laguna (I know). Drive along the water front at Lee on Solent and rather disconcertingly the screen showed us in the middle of the deep water channel.
 
I just walked past the old national HQ of Ordnance Survey to get the paper. The new HQ is a similar distance the other way.

Recently (last year? ), local news reported that OS had been trialling unmanned tractors that could work by GPS to 1cm accuracy.

I reckon what you've described is easy.
Lots of farms here in Oz ploughing driverless. And dump trucks in the mines.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
You might know the answer to this?

I rent a bit of land off the local farmer and he was spraying something or other on the field out the back of my place the other day. The sprayer didn’t seem to be working evenly so I mentioned this when he pulled up for the usual chat/ brew.

He said it was working perfectly and that the field had been satellite imaged and the data loaded to the sprayer and was hooked into a SatNav so that the amount of shit sprayed matched the amount needed, presumably patchy bits get a bit more?

Is this actually a thing? Is that technically possible?

If so, Wow!
It's definitely a thing. More gunk on the bits that need it less gunk on the bits that don't. It works out undulations in the field and moves the sprayer to keep a consistent height above ground level.

Our mate the arable farmer loves his.
 
Don't forget to get a risk assessment done

It‘s OK, I’ll just hold my other hand in front of my eyes.

Ive done all the courses, me.
 

tgo

War Hero
Ford Kuga. A great car IMHO.

Until a headlamp bulb goes.

I had a quick squint at the back of the sealed unit and just couldn’t figure it out. Putting it down to age and a little voice that said “don’t even think about it, it’ll cost you in the long run”, I took it to Halfords and rather pitifully said “giz us a bulb, and can you fit it for me please“.

”Certainly Sir, that’ll be 25p for the bulb and £19.99 to fit it” or some such nonsense. “Epic, I’m just going to do a quick bit of shopping, I’ll be back in an hour, here’s the key”.

60 minutes later, return to find the entire front bumper off and the wing flapping in the breeze. The lad had had to ring HQ to find out how to do it and that was the answer! It was a freezing day and the whole lot is held together with plastic clips so the guy was crapping himself in case any of the clips snapped what with being stiff and brittle with cold. As it happens he managed it but I’d have snapped one for sure.

£19.99 very well spent but why?

The newer Ford Kugas, you pretty much have to take off the whole front end to change the battery, it's like they built the car around the battery.
 

Blogg

LE
Last night Audi A3 Pool Car Mrs B has pending delivery of her new company car started, threw a wobbler: warning lights up, much beeping, then refused to do a thing apart from... flash warning lights and beep.

Happily only about 5km from home so we left it where it fell and got a taxi.

This morning it started, coughed a bit and then ran but very badly. Dumped at dealership.

Service wallah poked about for a bit, looked weary and suggested "known issues" and that she ask for another car because this one will be waiting on replacement components already on back order as part of a "service program"

What components?

"Rather a lot"

All sensors and control modules :(
 
Vauxhall wanted to charge me £90 just to investigate why my engine malfunction light was on. Despite the fact the car was there anyway for a service. Oh, but they kindly knocked it down to £60, because I’m a Vauxhall service club member ( free to join).
They also wanted to charge me £350 to replace a rear axle Bush. Plus VAT.
Independent garages said they’d do it for £140 plus VAT.
The independent garage out my car in a ramp and invited me to look at the problem so I could actually see it.
I honestly think sometimes its best to go to a decent independent garage.
Had a similar experience years ago when the ‘mechanic’ told herself that a bush in the steering linkage was seized. When I looked at it, it turned out to be a bonded rubber bush. “Oh no,” says the service manager, “it’s a ball bearing, it should rotate freely”. Heated discussion follows, followed by close inspection of the other ‘faults’. Turns out that the ‘cracked exhaust manifold’ could be cured by tightening the loose flange and that after removing the engine cowling to replace the spark plugs, the ‘mechanic’ had carefully replaced the dog hair and crushed crisps around the bolt heads. Needless to say, they lost our custom. When herself mentioned this to her boss, it turned out that the company’s vehicle fleet was serviced by the same dealer, but not for much longer...
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
Had a similar experience years ago when the ‘mechanic’ told herself that a bush in the steering linkage was seized. When I looked at it, it turned out to be a bonded rubber bush. “Oh no,” says the service manager, “it’s a ball bearing, it should rotate freely”. Heated discussion follows, followed by close inspection of the other ‘faults’. Turns out that the ‘cracked exhaust manifold’ could be cured by tightening the loose flange and that after removing the engine cowling to replace the spark plugs, the ‘mechanic’ had carefully replaced the dog hair and crushed crisps around the bolt heads. Needless to say, they lost our custom. When herself mentioned this to her boss, it turned out that the company’s vehicle fleet was serviced by the same dealer, but not for much longer...
How do you get dog hair and crushed crisps around an engine cowling, or was this a tamper detection device by yourselves?
 
How do you get dog hair and crushed crisps around an engine cowling, or was this a tamper detection device by yourselves?
Vauxhall midi. Engine between front seats, seats out and cowling off to access the spark plugs. Dog liked to sit in the front eating crisps. Obviously...
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
You might know the answer to this?

I rent a bit of land off the local farmer and he was spraying something or other on the field out the back of my place the other day. The sprayer didn’t seem to be working evenly so I mentioned this when he pulled up for the usual chat/ brew.

He said it was working perfectly and that the field had been satellite imaged and the data loaded to the sprayer and was hooked into a SatNav so that the amount of shit sprayed matched the amount needed, presumably patchy bits get a bit more?

Is this actually a thing? Is that technically possible?

If so, Wow!
Yes they have been doing that for years, the system knows the soil density, soil moisture levels, crop height and type of crop and adjusts accordingly
given the costs of chemicals its a no brainer
my nephew did 3 years at uni studying all of that stuff to take over the family farm, he then did another 2 years and went into rail engineering, as he reckons farming is a killer and a lonely life
he earns more than I do the clever sod
and he is dead useful when i need a bot of technical help, if he does not know the answer he knows where to look
he still cant navigate for toffee though !
4 hours from Ypres to Brussels via every back road, track, horse path, crater filled common, C/O a satnav set for cycling
his rich reward
a puncture on the edge of Brussels
tee hee
tubeless tyres and foam dont work so well either
Uncle sorted it the next day
not that I ever told any body ( much)
383.JPG
 
Last edited:
You might know the answer to this?

I rent a bit of land off the local farmer and he was spraying something or other on the field out the back of my place the other day. The sprayer didn’t seem to be working evenly so I mentioned this when he pulled up for the usual chat/ brew.

He said it was working perfectly and that the field had been satellite imaged and the data loaded to the sprayer and was hooked into a SatNav so that the amount of shit sprayed matched the amount needed, presumably patchy bits get a bit more?

Is this actually a thing? Is that technically possible?

If so, Wow!

I believe they call it digital farming.
 
You might know the answer to this?

I rent a bit of land off the local farmer and he was spraying something or other on the field out the back of my place the other day. The sprayer didn’t seem to be working evenly so I mentioned this when he pulled up for the usual chat/ brew.

He said it was working perfectly and that the field had been satellite imaged and the data loaded to the sprayer and was hooked into a SatNav so that the amount of shit sprayed matched the amount needed, presumably patchy bits get a bit more?

Is this actually a thing? Is that technically possible?

If so, Wow!

Absolutely and the norm now........
Field has no need to be previously mapped even ......the tractor will have GPS often to 1 cm accuracy and knows the width of the spray booms so can produce a "coverage map" of where its been and also if the booms were turned on or not . The latest sprayers have individual nozzle control so can taper boom shut off to prevent overspray or double dosage ..... in theory the driver could just drive aimlessly round the field until the in cab display showed he'd sprayed everything ( the map on the screen changes colour to show the covered area) and with this system would only have sprayed everything once .
Typical spayer booms are 24 meters and usually used to have just 5 sections that could individually be turned off ...before guidance this was a set of the pants/eye judgement by the driver .
Ferts spreaders and also drills now use the same section control .....this is driven by minimizing inputs and in ferts spreaders and sprayers for environmental reasons .

Makes me smile when farmers and AG techs are still thought of as being "strong in the arm and thick in the head"

The 20 something year old who comes out to fix a tractor often knows more about Satellite imagery / guidance than most other industry's....is an expert in Hydraulics / engines and transmission's, modern cutting edge electrics and unlike your techs is working in all disciplines not specialising in one ......in the middle of a field on kit worth many times that of a Ferrari ..... and yet is regarded at the bottom of the pile when it comes to engineering or his worth ....... most schools send the guys who struggle to read or write to Agricultural college because they think he will be "good with his hands".....
A big problem for dealers trying to find the next generation of techs....... good ones are a rare breed of intelligence and the willingness to lay under a machine in the cold and wet in 4 inches of shit to try and repair something that is made to incredibly fine tolerances or is working to milliamps resistances .
 
Recently (last year? ), local news reported that OS had been trialling unmanned tractors that could work by GPS to 1cm accuracy.

Dunno about the OS but we've been doing it for years...... all the tractors are within reason fully capable of being driverless but the cost to convert what they are pulling is extortionate ..... think if a plough blocks up with a bit of water grass or wood......the tractor has to know this and then stop until someone comes along to unblock it ....
Can't see driverless being a thing for most applications for a while but blokes sitting in the cab being driven around by the tractor while watching films streamed to the lap top via the in cab wifi is already here....they only need to intervene if it blocks or runs out of seed or spray etc .
 
Workshops currently have a radio controlled tracked earth mover in for repairs. It won't drive straight. I asked whether it was caused by the RC unit or the hydraulic drive. The fitter was unsure, but as he could not find a manual on the internet and did not have the plug in computer diagnostic tool, he was stripping the hydraulics just in case.
 

ABNredleg

War Hero
Dunno about the OS but we've been doing it for years...... all the tractors are within reason fully capable of being driverless but the cost to convert what they are pulling is extortionate ..... think if a plough blocks up with a bit of water grass or wood......the tractor has to know this and then stop until someone comes along to unblock it ....
Can't see driverless being a thing for most applications for a while but blokes sitting in the cab being driven around by the tractor while watching films streamed to the lap top via the in cab wifi is already here....they only need to intervene if it blocks or runs out of seed or spray etc .
They’re doing trials of driverless combines in Russia. Link to article US companies are also developing the technology. It certainly makes sense for huge flat farms.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
Down under they have had driverless earth movers for a while now
these big boys run with no problems
This was 2 years ago, its getting more common in mining and other large earthworks

they even have machines that lay bricks 24 hours a day with little outside assistance



and combines are all high tech, my neighbour tested one the other day
cant recall how much it cost, but it was big money, for something you can only use a few weeks every year
 

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