Rick Rescorla: Why no UK medal?

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
I understand that RLC ATOs are bring honoured with street names, and IIRC there is now a Warrant Officer Ken Bellringer Close...
They could hardly name it "Ken Bellringer Walk", could they?
 
And what medal could HMG have awarded?

Finally, I don't think the US awarded him anything either...
As you well know B_B, our Lizzy doesn't just hand medals to anyone. Mr Rescorla was a US veteran, killed in the US - his legacy has been well looked after in the US. Whilst Mr Rescorla was an extremely admirable man, he was no longer "one of us".
 
Assuming he had dual British and American nationalties,

While in the USA The US government says he is American and so does HMG
While in the UK the US government says he is British and so does HMG
In other countries it depends on the passport he entered the country on.

So as far as HMG is concerned he was a US citizen doing a brave thing in the USA, nothing to do with them.

Sent from my Lenovo TB2-X30F using Tapatalk
 
He seemed to be quite the humble guy though, and did not want to even see the movie. I don't think he gave two shits about not having a character in the movie, after all he lived it.

But that is something I did not really know, why does Mel dislike you folks so much?
It was released in Mar 02, he would have found it hard to see it anyway.
 
Except 4000 words about his background. I'd never heard of him. Seems like a top bloke.
I am trying to recall a book of the Battle of the Ia Drang Valley, the day after Hal Moore's battalion withdrew, in which Rick Rescorla, and his company, were briefly mentioned. Rick's battalion carried out a ground approach that smacked of four companies playing follow-my-leader, switched off, and assuming that the enemy had bugged out.
When the ambush was sprung, Rick's troops were the only ones down on the deck a mllisecond later. The remainder, still standing, scratching their heads and contributing to the high US casualty count, had simply not been taught basic infantry skills, thanks to the Pentomic Army model that believe that getting there the fastest, and with the mostest, was all that was important in training.

Amazing how an army's combat skills and experience can evaporate. In Korea, just five years after VJ Day, the US Army was no more than a speed-bump in the path of a third world army, N. Korea.

That being said, Hal Moore only won his battle at the Ia Drang because he had a lot of combat experience dealing with conventional warfare and mass assaults during the Korean War. The next few years of combat that followed his battle in Vietnam were of the guerrilla variety, of course.
 
On the general question of medal entitlement, be it Cold War, or POW, or whenever. I have a late uncle who had been a navigator in Bomber Command during WW2. Following a night raid on his station at a time when the aircraft, Sterlings(?) were in the process of being bombed-up, he, and a wounded armourer, hooked up a tractor to a bomb trolley and pulled the load away from a burning aircraft. Their actions were never recognised, or deemed worthy of note, unlike the station commander and the group captain, visiting the station after the raid was hours past, who allegedly wrote each other up and received mentions in dispatches for inspiring their men whilst under heavy fire.

Lack of recognition did not diminish my uncles and the armourers deed, fraudulent claims, on the other hand, diminish the ribbon.
 
Just spent the last 3 weeks in USA - so many highways, streets etc dedicated to police, paramedics, servicemen and women. Not sure we do this in the UK apart from on base - I shall spend some time on google!
Apart from Dinger Drive, there's also on the Great Western Housing estate in Didcot . .

  • Warrant Officer 2 Gary O’Donnell, 40, of 11 EOD Regiment, who died in an explosion in Helmand Province, Afghanistan, in 2008. (Old mate of mine BTW)
  • Staff Sergeant Olaf Schmid, 30, of 11 EOD Regiment, who died in an explosion in Helmand in 2009.
  • Captain Daniel Shepherd, 28, of 11 EOD Regiment, who died in an explosion in Helmand in 2009.
  • Staff Sergeant Chris Muir, 32, of the Royal Logistic Corps, who died in southern Iraq in 2003.
  • Captain Lisa Head, 29, of 11 EOD Regiment, who was injured in an explosion in Afghanistan and died of her wounds at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, in Birmingham, in April 2011.




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Drink more beer to kill those feelings!
Whilst I really doubt that's the issue, I feel the first three words of your suggestion is good general advice and fits in well with my life plan.
 
I am trying to recall a book of the Battle of the Ia Drang Valley, the day after Hal Moore's battalion withdrew, in which Rick Rescorla, and his company, were briefly mentioned. Rick's battalion carried out a ground approach that smacked of four companies playing follow-my-leader, switched off, and assuming that the enemy had bugged out.
When the ambush was sprung, Rick's troops were the only ones down on the deck a mllisecond later. The remainder, still standing, scratching their heads and contributing to the high US casualty count, had simply not been taught basic infantry skills, thanks to the Pentomic Army model that believe that getting there the fastest, and with the mostest, was all that was important in training.

Amazing how an army's combat skills and experience can evaporate. In Korea, just five years after VJ Day, the US Army was no more than a speed-bump in the path of a third world army, N. Korea.

That being said, Hal Moore only won his battle at the Ia Drang because he had a lot of combat experience dealing with conventional warfare and mass assaults during the Korean War. The next few years of combat that followed his battle in Vietnam were of the guerrilla variety, of course.
I'm sure it's in We Were Soldiers Once, after Hal Moores battle.
 
As you well know B_B, our Lizzy doesn't just hand medals to anyone. Mr Rescorla was a US veteran, killed in the US - his legacy has been well looked after in the US. Whilst Mr Rescorla was an extremely admirable man, he was no longer "one of us".


My bold.. really what about this moron


and more recently these .. C:/Users/Ken/AppData/Local/Microsoft/Windows/INetCache/IE/MQAB0I4T/2018-honorary-awards.pdf
 
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Amazing how an army's combat skills and experience can evaporate. In Korea, just five years after VJ Day, the US Army was no more than a speed-bump in the path of a third world army, N. Korea.
I’m not sure a 500 man training team of US or any other country’s soldiers would have been much more than a ‘speed bump’ for eight Divisions and an Armd Bde (90,000 troops) that launched a surprise attack on three fronts. Many of whom were ‘battle hardened’ from fighting the Japanese and Nationalists in China.
 

Baglock

On ROPS
On ROPs
I am trying to recall a book of the Battle of the Ia Drang Valley, the day after Hal Moore's battalion withdrew, in which Rick Rescorla, and his company, were briefly mentioned. Rick's battalion carried out a ground approach that smacked of four companies playing follow-my-leader, switched off, and assuming that the enemy had bugged out.
When the ambush was sprung, Rick's troops were the only ones down on the deck a mllisecond later. The remainder, still standing, scratching their heads and contributing to the high US casualty count, had simply not been taught basic infantry skills, thanks to the Pentomic Army model that believe that getting there the fastest, and with the mostest, was all that was important in training.

Amazing how an army's combat skills and experience can evaporate. In Korea, just five years after VJ Day, the US Army was no more than a speed-bump in the path of a third world army, N. Korea.

That being said, Hal Moore only won his battle at the Ia Drang because he had a lot of combat experience dealing with conventional warfare and mass assaults during the Korean War. The next few years of combat that followed his battle in Vietnam were of the guerrilla variety, of course.
I believe that the bulk of Rick's battalion were involved in the ambush, whilst Rick's rifle company were attached to Moore's battalion. Rick and his company were then choppered in under fire to help salvage the situation, IIRC the book
 
I'm sure it's in We Were Soldiers Once, after Hal Moores battle.
I think that you may be right. None of the book titles about the Ia Drang, other than We Were Soldiers, ring any bells.

Thank you for that :) @28th/LX1
 
I believe that the bulk of Rick's battalion were involved in the ambush, whilst Rick's rifle company were attached to Moore's battalion. Rick and his company were then choppered in under fire to help salvage the situation, IIRC the book
I am going to have to buy it again and refresh my memory.
 
I’m not sure a 500 man training team of US or any other country’s soldiers would have been much more than a ‘speed bump’ for eight Divisions and an Armd Bde (90,000 troops) that launched a surprise attack on three fronts. Many of whom were ‘battle hardened’ from fighting the Japanese and Nationalists in China.
5th July, 1950, Task Force Smith, the 540 man advance party of the US 24th Division, were with the ROKs at the Battle of Osan. By 14th July the rest of the US 24th Division had arrived (presumably with US 21st Inf Div and the US 7th Cav Div) and 24th Div suffered over six thousand losses in dead, wounded, and captured personnel, including the Divisional Commander


I am not aware of N. Korean troops previously fighting the Japanese and Chinese Nationalists but I will take your word for that. My information was that they were merely Soviet trained and equipped.
I borrowed the speed bump term from Carl F. Bernard, who was initially a platoon commander with Task Force Smith, and used it during his account to a Pentagon investigation.
"We were a speed bump for the N. Koreans"
 
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5th July, 1950, Task Force Smith, the 540 man advance party of the US 24th Division, were with the ROKs at the Battle of Osan. By 14th July the rest of the US 24th Division had arrived (presumably with US 21st Inf Div and the US 7th Cav Div) and 24th Div suffered over six thousand losses in dead, wounded, and captured personnel.
They were sent after the invasion started. Undermanned and under equipped including limited AT wpns.
I am not aware of N. Korean troops previously fighting the Japanese and Chinese Nationalists but I will take your word for that. My information was that they were merely Soviet trained and equipped.
Many were with Tubby 1 when he was fighting the Japanese etc.
I borrowed the speed bump term from Carl F. Bernard, who was initially a platoon commander with Task Force Smith, and used it during his account to a Pentagon investigation.
"We were a speed bump for the N. Koreans"
To be fair, even if you added the initial 500 of the KMAG and the 540 of TF Smith, against 90k troops including armour, any unit of 1,000+ troops would have been a 'speed bump' let alone the US troops quoted.
 
They were sent after the invasion started. Undermanned and under equipped including limited AT wpns.

Many were with Tubby 1 when he was fighting the Japanese etc.

To be fair, even if you added the initial 500 of the KMAG and the 540 of TF Smith, against 90k troops including armour, any unit of 1,000+ troops would have been a 'speed bump' let alone the US troops quoted.
A brown adrenaline moment, at any rate.
 
Comment was made that HMG did not see fit to award him a medal, as not enough of the lives he saved where British and in any case he was by that point a US Citizen.
As a matter of interest, which gong do you think he has earned from Her Maj? I only ask, because to hear him talk, he left Colour service before he could deploy?
 

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