Rhodesia (and its Bush War)

In this Rhodesian troopiesong, he says "blue stone in my tea"
Is this the same as what was given to soldiers during national service to calm them down like an anti viagra?

My bold you mean the myth about Bromide in the cookhouse tea? Military myth puts lead in bromide's pencil › Dr Karl's Great Moments In Science (ABC Science)
snip "It was there that we heard from the regular army soldiers that 'someone' (whoever 'someone' was) put bromide in our food to keep our sexual libido well suppressed.
In his book Sex and the British, the author Paul Ferris refers to the use of bromide to reduce the sexual libido of soldiers. But once again, it's not true.
This myth that the new recruits are so virile that they need to be tamed and contained by drugs is a backhanded compliment to the soldiers."
 

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
My bold you mean the myth about Bromide in the cookhouse tea? Military myth puts lead in bromide's pencil › Dr Karl's Great Moments In Science (ABC Science)
snip "It was there that we heard from the regular army soldiers that 'someone' (whoever 'someone' was) put bromide in our food to keep our sexual libido well suppressed.
In his book Sex and the British, the author Paul Ferris refers to the use of bromide to reduce the sexual libido of soldiers. But once again, it's not true.
This myth that the new recruits are so virile that they need to be tamed and contained by drugs is a backhanded compliment to the soldiers."
If they did then I think it's beginning to wear off now.
 

anglo

LE
Painful indeed.
Yes having a black government certainly raised living standards in zim


Poverty and unemployment are both endemic in Zimbabwe, driven by the shrinking economy and hyper-inflation. Poverty rates in 2007 were nearly 80%, while the unemployment rate in 2009 was ranked as the world's largest, at 95%.

The first thing you notice about the money in Zimbabwe is that it's filthy. The bills have been passed back and forth so many times the numbers are almost rubbed off. The second thing you notice is that there are no coins. Prices are in dollars and cents, but when you pay, the stores round up and give you your change in store credit, phone minutes, or lollipops.
I'm confused. Zimbabwe's per capita GDP is $600, the third lowest in the world. The average wage is $253 a month—and that's for the 30 percent of the population who are employed. The highest government salary is $508 per month. I ask around, and it's not just the expat supplies that are expensive. All the basics—sugar, maize, eggs, cooking oil—are more expensive in Zimbabwe, kilo for kilo, than they are in Zambia, Botswana, or even South Africa, where the average wages are 19 times higher than they are here.

Zimbabwe wasn't just spending more, it was also producing less. Starting in 2000, Mugabe implemented a land reform program in which thousands of commercial farms were confiscated from their traditional (i.e. white) owners and gifted to Mugabe's friends and cronies. Few of the new owners knew how to run a commercial farm, and some simply fired all the employees and sold the equipment for parts. Agricultural exports, the backbone of Zimbabwe’s economy, went into free fall.
 

par avion

War Hero
Yes having a black government certainly raised living standards in zim


Poverty and unemployment are both endemic in Zimbabwe, driven by the shrinking economy and hyper-inflation. Poverty rates in 2007 were nearly 80%, while the unemployment rate in 2009 was ranked as the world's largest, at 95%.

The first thing you notice about the money in Zimbabwe is that it's filthy. The bills have been passed back and forth so many times the numbers are almost rubbed off. The second thing you notice is that there are no coins. Prices are in dollars and cents, but when you pay, the stores round up and give you your change in store credit, phone minutes, or lollipops.
I'm confused. Zimbabwe's per capita GDP is $600, the third lowest in the world. The average wage is $253 a month—and that's for the 30 percent of the population who are employed. The highest government salary is $508 per month. I ask around, and it's not just the expat supplies that are expensive. All the basics—sugar, maize, eggs, cooking oil—are more expensive in Zimbabwe, kilo for kilo, than they are in Zambia, Botswana, or even South Africa, where the average wages are 19 times higher than they are here.

Zimbabwe wasn't just spending more, it was also producing less. Starting in 2000, Mugabe implemented a land reform program in which thousands of commercial farms were confiscated from their traditional (i.e. white) owners and gifted to Mugabe's friends and cronies. Few of the new owners knew how to run a commercial farm, and some simply fired all the employees and sold the equipment for parts. Agricultural exports, the backbone of Zimbabwe’s economy, went into free fall.
There was a thriving light industrial sector based around the farming sector based in Bulawayo. All that is now gone making the resurrection of the farms a lot harder if at all.
 

par avion

War Hero
What happened to China, the all weather friend according to Mugabe. Have even they realised that the place is a basket case now that they have looted all the diamonds and other minerals?

I noticed that the first place that the 'Crocodile visited with his begging bowl was Britain. Home of the nasty old colonial whities - the evil empire.
 
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JockScot

Old-Salt
My bold you mean the myth about Bromide in the cookhouse tea? Military myth puts lead in bromide's pencil › Dr Karl's Great Moments In Science (ABC Science)
snip "It was there that we heard from the regular army soldiers that 'someone' (whoever 'someone' was) put bromide in our food to keep our sexual libido well suppressed.
In his book Sex and the British, the author Paul Ferris refers to the use of bromide to reduce the sexual libido of soldiers. But once again, it's not true.
This myth that the new recruits are so virile that they need to be tamed and contained by drugs is a backhanded compliment to the soldiers."
Ah brilliant! A good read cheers, interesting how a placebo can work.
 
Nice touch that C Sqn at 22 SAS remains vacant
I was in Johannesburg at the end of last month.
The South African military Museum there is in surprisingly good order.
A few PR touches since majority rule, but superb collections of First and Second World War kit and information.
I was particularly pleased to note their memorial wall to paratroopers.
When I enquired as to what theatres the dead and MIAs were from, one of the staff explained that the various contacts in and around Namibia and Angela were in undeclared wars…1970s /1980s
 

Zhopa

War Hero
Nice touch that C Sqn at 22 SAS remains vacant
Also that the Selous Scouts banner (colours? what's the right name for something with buffalo horns?) eventually found an appropriate home in the Officers' Mess at Credenhill.
 

Tool

LE
When I enquired as to what theatres the dead and MIAs were from, one of the staff explained that the various contacts in and around Namibia and Angela were in undeclared wars…1970s /1980s
Similarly at the Voortrekker Monument complex. The bosoorlog dead (soldiers) are remembered in a garden in the grounds of the Voortrekker monument, whilst those of the lilberation groups (civilian and combatant) are remembered at the Freedom Park Heritage Site on the other side of the valley.
 
Guess which one looks like a cross between a circus and an African airport.
 
I never knew about the fake 25 pounders until I went to the Zimbo Army museum in Gweru.

Looking around there is a 25 pounder , looking closer its a fake , bit like the stuff Maskelyne made in WW2 for Montgomery in the desert.

Seems the terrs had their own network of spies near the Army bases . So on Ops many RODEFS , Rhodesian bedford 4 toners , would drive out of barracks towing 25 pounders. Spies reported the fact , so it was going to be an external raid .

cross border into Mozambique or Zambia?

No smoke and mirrors.

Mind many Rhodesians did serve in WW2 in the desert campaign , there was even a Rhodesian LRDG Sqn.
 

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