RH Haslar - should it be reopened?

#1
I go past this place every day, either on the bike or walking the hound. It's been closed for a while, yet there remains the infrastructure within for an excellent hospital for the use of the military. What baffles me was the abject lack of mention of this during the run up to the election. Why has the subject ref the absence of dedicated military hospitals seem to have dropped off the political agenda?
 
#2
Good idea but one word will occur time and time again

COST!!!
 
#4
RoyogtheRovers said:
Well its been sold for apartments so I doubt the MoD could afford to buy it back.
sold for £3 million.... and kept very quiet. A lot of waterfront and real estate for very little money.
 
#9
mick_sterbs said:
What about re-opening Wroughton? Ely?

or have they been sold off to make the nations coffers bulge?
Wroughton istr is now an industrial estae. Which proves my point that property is more important than health and welfare, especially of those in the employ of HM.
 
#10
I think it needs to be watched, but from the news reports Gosport Council and local residents are very involved in making sure that it doesn't just become another expensive luxury housing development.
 
#11
easesprings said:
Good idea but one word will occur time and time again

COST!!!
It's been mentioned here on other threads but the Cambridge Military Hospital in Aldershot used to take in civilians from the surrounding area, not just service-people and their families. There was a brickie in the bed opposite me when I was there in 1987, for instance. I'll never forget watching a Coldstreamer bull his trainers for him, just for a laugh - boredom's a terrible thing.

I suspect the other military hospitals did the same.

The idea that military hospitals need treat only the military is a myth, so the cost argument, is it a bit of a smokescreen? It's not as if facilities are (or need be) held for the exclusive (and therefore overly costly) use of the military. But you do then have the advantage of a facility that you can clear, secure and use for military-only purposes as and when.

The other advantage, of course, is that they can be run to military standards of cleanliness...
 
#12
Cold_Collation said:
The other advantage, of course, is that they can be run to military standards of cleanliness...
Both myself and Sfub senior have ended up with MRSA as a result of the wonderful care of the QA. Ended my career prematurely, and something I'll never forgive the NHS for.
 
#13
Cold_Collation said:
It's been mentioned here on other threads but the Cambridge Military Hospital in Aldershot used to take in civilians from the surrounding area
I suspect the other military hospitals did the same.

The idea that military hospitals need treat only the military is a myth, so the cost argument, is it a bit of a smokescreen?
Sorry to chop your quote up a bit, youre right about the UK based Military Hospitals taking NHS patients from the local area, in fact at the CMH, because it had an A&E it took all sorts as an ambulance usually goes to the nearest A&E if it has serious casualties on board rather than to its home hospital. The military would be paid for any NHS patients it had, the same way that the MoD now pays NHS hospitals for meeting quotas for the military patients it treats.

As for cost, the military hospitals were closed as part of DCS 15, the DCS stood for Defence Cost Study, it concluded that for the cost of each military hospital it could fund 4 MDHUs.

Its absolute bollox to say it had nothing to do with cost and it was because of clinical competencies.
 
#14
I'm sure that Raf Halton's hospital was used by the civvy populace, mind you , there was nothing of comparable size for a large area around. Aylesbury hospital used to send patients over all the time.

That'd make an ideal 'New' military hospital. But like others have said, the political will and funding just isn't there. Shame.
 
#16
Not so fond memories of Haslar. Fecking butchers wanted to experiment on me in '71. If I recall, there was a also a hospital just up the road (Stoke's Road?) on the way to Browndown ranges, which had the war memorial outside it.
 
#19
sfub said:
Cold_Collation said:
The other advantage, of course, is that they can be run to military standards of cleanliness...
Both myself and Sfub senior have ended up with MRSA as a result of the wonderful care of the QA. Ended my career prematurely, and something I'll never forgive the NHS for.
Same happened to the ex Mr E but a different hospital. He was never the same after that.
 
#20
sfub and Enigma 266 - sorry to hear it, sincerely. Cleanliness at CMH was fine while I was there. Perhaps then adjust to the effect that military standards of cleanliness COULD be implemented.

(And, then again, perhaps some of those harking back to the 'good old days' of military hospitals should remember some of the realities. The myelogram I had done at CMH was pretty rough even if the ward was clean...)

Royogtherovers - hence the question-mark at the end - I was asking if it was a smokescreen.

I was only treated at CMH, I had nothing to do with running it. But the inference from the political side - at least, as far as I've ever read it in the press - is that it is the maintaining of capabilities/specialties for the exclusive use of the military that would drive costs up inordinately. My point is that resources and facilities need not be for the exclusive use of the military - that in times past they weren't, in fact.

Regarding MDHUs: a lot has been said on arrse and elsewhere about Selly Oak (just for instance), much of it negative. A lot of people have expressed a desire or a need for a military hospital. Perhaps again an adjustment could/need be made: something to the effect that some of the costs of an 'exclusive' military hospital could be offset by treating NHS patients as and when.

(That one, I suppose, comes down to political will, which we know has been sorely lacking these last few years.)

Or, to put things another way, couldn't clinical competencies be maintained by treating NHS patients - so is the supposed negative effect on clinical competency of having a military hospital the real smokescreen?

I'm long since out of the system. I'm only asking on here out of a genuine interest in finding out what the realities are. Because you can guarantee I'm not going to learn them in the mainstream newspapers.

A question to you: which do you feel is best? A series of MDHUs or a dedicated hospital? Why?

Edited once for grammar.
 

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