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Retirement: Any regrets?

Pensionable service for soldiers in those days didn’t start until 18, so the most he could have taken over to the police is 2 years mil pension, which would equate to maybe a year of police pension. I still can’t see anyway that he could have left at 42 with a pension that would allow him to never work again, unless he was seriously incapacitated.
Agreed. The only one I can remember who went at 42 was a Sergeant who had joined at 18 years. The key thing here on the 24 years ( actual) service was that:

1] He left on one of the service's periodic clearing outs which lead to:

2] Medical discharge ( for enlarged heart) seemingly in perfect health although he did die of cancer a couple of years later.

Given the dreadful nature of village gossip, it is quite likely he did his 25 and the bearer's of village doom have lopped a few years off his service. If he lasts to the age of 80, he will have done 1 weeks service making tea as a probationer and received a yearly pension equivalent to the GDP of Ecuador.
 
Do none of you retiree`s feel any guilt for doing fcuk all ? assuming you are in good health and under 65 dont you feel you should be doing something productive ?are you that much better than idle dole drawers?
Depends on what you mean by productive.

I think that having paid tax and NI for 40 years my entitlement to anything 'free' is a little more than a dolies. Besides which I'm not getting anything 'free' yet. My MoD pension is a benefit from my years of service. My other pension is a condition of my civilian employment. When I get the OAP pension it'll be exactly the same as every other 66 year old who's paid a full stamp for 40 years.

Cheers easy.
 
An alternative view; work doesn’t have to involve an employer or office these days. The gig economy is a wonderful place for people who have time and don’t need to earn big money. It’s perfectly possible to make reasonable money from home, whilst learning new skills, meeting new people and keeping the brain active.

We work when we want to, not when someone else tells us we need to. We only pick jobs we want to do. Between us, we’ve got six different revenue streams outside of my pension. Neither of us work more than 4 hours a day.
It's a Pyramid Scam...don't fall for it guys....
 
Do none of you retiree`s feel any guilt for doing fcuk all ? assuming you are in good health and under 65 dont you feel you should be doing something productive ?are you that much better than idle dole drawers?
You've fallen into the trap which many people who are still working do. You're forgetting the number of years that we've put into working/saving/planning to be able to retire when we can. I get the envy of looking at someone who's been working for 40+ years and going 'lucky bastard' forgetting that they've worked for it :)
 

corby

Old-Salt
I joined the Fire Brigade in '78 aged just 18 and did my 32 yrs before I could retire at 50. I couldn't wait to get out of the door. I actually finished a couple of weeks before 50 with leave and some time in lieu owing to me, I haven't set foot on a fire station since. I've done little "work" since which has suited me fine. Before my mother died 4 years ago I was able to be there for what ever was required without having to suck up to some w*%ker of a manager. Same with other family commitments and events, no issues getting time off or having to clamber to book odd shifts off. I do what I want (as long as SWMBO agrees) when I want.
Do none of you retiree`s feel any guilt for doing fcuk all ? assuming you are in good health and under 65 dont you feel you should be doing something productive ?are you that much better than idle dole drawers?
No guilt at all.
 
Do none of you retiree`s feel any guilt for doing fcuk all ? assuming you are in good health and under 65 dont you feel you should be doing something productive ?are you that much better than idle dole drawers?
Not a single second's guilt.
I've worked and paid tax since I was 18, been a productive member of society all these years, plus educated the next generation. We never know when HE WHO TALKS IN CAPITALS will come with l'addition finale, so enjoying every minute. . . especially when my our delightful granddaughter comes to stay.
 
I’m 67 but I worked nearly 48 years for my 5 pensions. I even worked past my 65th birthday to finish a project - which got me into social benefits clawback territory.
Today, almost 3 years into retirement, I took a leisurely trip to town to visit the bank and cable company. Then I went for coffee here...


I have no problem being retired!
Just curious,where is that delightful spot?
 
including the 1987 scheme, retirement could be applied for at the 25 year point.
You had to be age 50 or over for it to be paid immediatly though. I couldn't see the point. Better to soldier on for another 5 years and get the full 30 year pension which was much more.

As for transfering previous military service into the police pension scheme - it only applied to service after 1974. I lost a year as I was 18 in 1973. There were two lads on my relief/team in the nineties in the Met who had completed 9 years service in the RAF and RN in the sixties to the early seventies who couldn't transfer any service over. It was something to do with the military pension rules changing in 1974.
 

Enigma266

War Hero
"retired" at 50. It was a decision that look me a while to come to terms with (about 3 months) and then I settled into a routine. A routine is vital otherwise you just drift. If I really want to do something then I can always do contract work but find that I more than fill my time. I would say make sure you plan and you have hobbies to occupy yourself, otherwise it will be a nightmare. Oh and make sure all debt is cleared & big purchases have happened. I missed the banter and the people but have found new friends with new banter. My hand was forced but do I regret not taking another job - not a chance!
 
Do none of you retiree`s feel any guilt for doing fcuk all ? assuming you are in good health and under 65 dont you feel you should be doing something productive ?are you that much better than idle dole drawers?
No like others have said, we worked for it. We are also still paying income tax on our occupational pensions.
 
No like others have said, we worked for it. We are also still paying income tax on our occupational pensions.
I just wondered how others felt about doing nothing/ being non productive , If I dont work /get things done I feel guilty with myself for being being lazy but feel good if I get stuff done .
 
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