Resuscitation and Covid19 (basic life support/CPR)

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer

For all you budding good Samaritans out there and anybody involved in CPR, there is new guidance from resus council.

Our Health Board is stated any collapse is to be considered Covid19 positive and all resuscitation to be performed with full PPE.

In our area No PPE = No resus.

PPE is FFP3 mask, visor, long sleeved gown and double gloved
Seems sensible.

I always carry a little face barrier in my wallet but l will admit I'd made the decision to not put my mouth anywhere near their mouth.
 

arfah

LE
What’s the legal position?

e.g. A trained first aider does not provide CPR because they do not have appropriate PPE...?

Asking for a unhealthy friend.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
What’s the legal position?

e.g. A trained first aider does not provide CPR because they do not have appropriate PPE...?

Asking for a unhealthy friend.
First principle of first aid, do not become a casualty yourself.
 
With all the defibrillators in little locked boxes in public places now are they going to put another box full of PPE?
 
What’s the legal position?

e.g. A trained first aider does not provide CPR because they do not have appropriate PPE...?

Asking for a unhealthy friend.
I wish I'd kept those portion resuscitators now, anyway we used to teach dealing with "casualties of an Objectionable nature"

If it was dangerous to carry out the mouth to mouth element then compressions only is an option.
 

TamH70

MIA
AFAIK, it's been the big thrust, if you'll pardon the pun, of the British Heart Foundation's CPR adverts that you can get away with doing just chest compressions. Sensei Vinnie Jones told me that several years ago if I recall correctly.

Adding full PPE to do CPR now is a new wrinkle I'll have to think on.
 
Glad to see masks are being manufactured to the highest standards in completely sterile and sanitary conditions:
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
With all the defibrillators in little locked boxes in public places now are they going to put another box full of PPE?
Our hospital resus trolleys do indeed now have a bag of PPE attached.

The resus response team have fetching little bum bags containing theirs.
 

Slime

LE
What’s the guideline for collapsing opposition politicians, BBC staff or left wing journalists?

Is it still the case that blowing smoke up their arse returns them to full health?
 

Yokel

LE
One of the advantages of the 'lockdown' will be that fewer people will need CPR or other first aid as their will be less accidents at work, road accidents, or alcohol related incidents. Sadly arguments over the the last bog roll or bag of pasta may cause tempers to flare - hopefully not causing heart attacks though but that is a risk.

Is there any guidance regarding control of bleeding? My brother saved the life of a mate who had cut himself with a chainsaw.
 

Slime

LE
One of the advantages of the 'lockdown' will be that fewer people will need CPR or other first aid as their will be less accidents at work, road accidents, or alcohol related incidents. Sadly arguments over the the last bog roll or bag of pasta may cause tempers to flare - hopefully not causing heart attacks though but that is a risk.

Is there any guidance regarding control of bleeding? My brother saved the life of a mate who had cut himself with a chainsaw.
You raise an excellent point.

While many journalists are desperate to spread scare stories about NHS staff being put at risk, or lambs to the slaughter due to lack of PPE I do wonder just how much easier some aspects of A and E are right now.

With a huge decrease in the number of drunk, drugged or drunk/drugged ********* filling up A and E on weekends and evenings the risk of verbal and physical abuse should be very evident.
 

A.N.Other

Old-Salt
I wish I'd kept those portion resuscitators now, anyway we used to teach dealing with "casualties of an Objectionable nature"

If it was dangerous to carry out the mouth to mouth element then compressions only is an option.
Compressions only is also a major risk. Every compression forces air out of the lungs. Its as if you are making them cough..... Straight at you as you're crouched above them.

Advice in Mountain Rescue is to use a bag/valve/mask for rescue breathing. A pocket mask with good seal and one way valve at a minimum. These capture any droplets blown out of the lungs. Mouth to mouth is a no-no, even with a face shield.

If I'm in public and not wearing a mask and goggles I probably wouldn't perform CPR. Even then I'd consider placing a cloth over their face. If it's family then I'd take the risk.
 

pooky

Old-Salt
You raise an excellent point.

While many journalists are desperate to spread scare stories about NHS staff being put at risk, or lambs to the slaughter due to lack of PPE I do wonder just how much easier some aspects of A and E are right now.

With a huge decrease in the number of drunk, drugged or drunk/drugged ********* filling up A and E on weekends and evenings the risk of verbal and physical abuse should be very evident.
Plus.....maybe people who would in the past needlessly have attended A and E when they got a splinter in their thumb or stubbed their toe may think twice about going and deal with their minor injuries at home.
 
What’s the guideline for collapsing opposition politicians, BBC staff or left wing journalists?

Is it still the case that blowing smoke up their arse returns them to full health?
I believe for CPR jumping up and down on their chest maintains the correct 2m spacing.
 

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