restoring a semi auto

skeetstar

Old-Salt
Gentles all, I bought a cheap knocked about Beretta 303 the other week, with the intention of 'doing it up'.
The wood is stripped, the dents raised and stock and fore end are some way to be refinished.
I've got a few spare parts from an outfit in Italy (recoil spring and a new stock bolt nut etc) which will return it to first class mechanical condition.

Question
The receiver is a shiny black lacquer which has been chipped and gouged in a few places, marking the underlying
aluminium. I plan to get the receiver cerakoted, but I'm worried that the little marks in the alloy will stick out like a sore thumb under the new finish.

I though about filling them with liquid metal type stuff, but the outfit who will cerakote the parts say that their preparation process (blasting with ally oxide) will strip out any such repairs I make. Next thought was to buy a Dremel and see if I could grind then back to make them look 'features' or disguise them in some way.

Anyone got any better ideas as to what I might do?

Can post some photos if that would help deliberations.
 
I restored an old WW2 Luger some years ago, it had been out in someones shed for around 50 years before I was given it. It was covered in surface rust, looked like terrible pitting so I went at it with some wet and dry working up from around 400 to 1000. Careful so as not to remove any markings and worked slowly slowly. Buffed it all up on a big wheel in my mates shoe repair shop for the final polish and had it re-blued. It did not look too bad once done - you could still see some minor pitting in places near markings, but the rest came up nicely and not really obvious unless closely inspected. The only real issue was for purists who might whinge that the slightly rough WW2 finish and production markings had been polished out.

Two points:

1. I don't know why they are blasting with ally oxide in the US my mate does cerakote and he blasts using baking soda to strip existing finish and not to strip surface metal.

2. Why don't you give it a spray with some matt black duplicolour on a small section (masking everything else off) and see how some of the worst pitting looks? Alternatively give a small section a brush with some liquid blue. Either should give you an indication.
 
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ugly

LE
Moderator
I have a nice 1911 A5 in for a lot of work, I will discuss with the client regarding finishing later. I will be replacing the mag tube with a newer one which will require crimping. The tube doesn't usually have a serial number and the guns serial number wont be changing so I dont expect it needs proof by law. Interested before I start work to see if it does. At the moment its two piles of parts, one the base gun and one the donor which will be written off as spares.
 

4(T)

LE
Gentles all, I bought a cheap knocked about Beretta 303 the other week, with the intention of 'doing it up'.
The wood is stripped, the dents raised and stock and fore end are some way to be refinished.
I've got a few spare parts from an outfit in Italy (recoil spring and a new stock bolt nut etc) which will return it to first class mechanical condition.

Question
The receiver is a shiny black lacquer which has been chipped and gouged in a few places, marking the underlying
aluminium. I plan to get the receiver cerakoted, but I'm worried that the little marks in the alloy will stick out like a sore thumb under the new finish.

I though about filling them with liquid metal type stuff, but the outfit who will cerakote the parts say that their preparation process (blasting with ally oxide) will strip out any such repairs I make. Next thought was to buy a Dremel and see if I could grind then back to make them look 'features' or disguise them in some way.

Anyone got any better ideas as to what I might do?

Can post some photos if that would help deliberations.

Presumably there is a primer or filler that is compatible with cerakote, and thus it could just be a matter of filling the gouges after the receiver has been blasted?

Don't the cerakote firm offer any sort of minor surface repair?
 

skeetstar

Old-Salt
Effendi, yes the spray over with black to get a view of how distinct the gouges are is in plan. It may be that I am worrying about nothing and that they can be rubbed away per Uglys suggestion.
Agree with your comment re the blasting medium. From owning land rovers I understood that finished Aluminium had a surface which could be seriously damaged if treated to harshly, so I may look to get it soda blasted and then have this chap degrease and apply cerakote.

4(T), yes I'll look into that esp if I get it blasted before taking to the 'Cerakoter'

Thanks for interest guys, I'll let you know how I get on.
 

Mufulira

Old-Salt
Certainly like the soda blasting idea as it will it worked very well on an old No1 MkIII in .410 that had seen some horrible service as a jail gun
 

Mufulira

Old-Salt
As a last resort in re-furbishing some old clunker firearms at @ $20 Canadian from the bargain barrel at the entrance with missing parts etc and require several months locating parts and finally selling/trading off for $400 CDn as swaps for other Enfield pieces that catch my eye. The use of stove enamel in masking rust pits and blemishes has proved remarkably durable and long-lasting, after all a stove gets to be pretty hot and never sheds its coating. Besides most of the formerly rusty bits are now covered in timber and most likely will never fire a full 10rd magazine anyway! As a bonus I also take time to fibreglass bed the action and draws to ensure a 100% snug fit which tends to iprove accuracy quite nicely with custom reloads. How else can I piss away pension money than converting beer and scotch into urine!
 

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