Resting Heart Rate

Awol

LE
I was hospitalised a couple of months ago and on arrival at A&E my heart rate was 145. The medics were so concerned they wheeled me into Resus, it was purely precautionary so that if I did start to croak all the gadgets would be next to the bed.

Unfortunately I just had time to text family that I was in Resus when my phone battery died. They spent the next 24hrs thinking I was being surrounded by paramedics shouting "Clear!" and "Is he back?".
 

Niamac

GCM
Resting heart rate is merely one indicator and it is affected by the luck of your genes.

Maximum heart rate is age related and the rule of thumb for adults is 220 minus your age.

More important is your recovery rate i.e. how fast after strenuous max effort exercise your heart rate returns to the high steady rate (normally about 120 bpm for a young man). If you are competition fit then it should go from max to HSR in about a minute.

Forbes Carlile the Australian Swimming Coach did a fair amount of work on blood pressure. Basically in going from average fitness to race fitness the systolic pressure rises due to heart getting fitter and the diastolic pressure falls as the muscles build more capillaries. Again the rule of thumb was it takes about 6 weeks of hard training to improve you race fitness by 50% and about 2 weeks of inactivity to take it back down again. He then covers the theory of timing of training for an event including the tapering off period. Good read for competition athletes.
 

Niamac

GCM
Like at the end of a balls-out 5k race.
I recognise the feeling but would tend to disagree a bit about that, unless of course, there was a serious sprint finish. Endurance in sports has improved greatly in recent years but the effects of a really high-impact effort like a 400m run or a 200m swim gets the heart rate right up to maximum It is hard to sustain that maximum for the sort of time it take to run 5k.

This is the reasoning behind the Fartlek system of interval training.
 
I recognise the feeling but would tend to disagree a bit about that, unless of course, there was a serious sprint finish. Endurance in sports has improved greatly in recent years but the effects of a really high-impact effort like a 400m run or a 200m swim gets the heart rate right up to maximum It is hard to sustain that maximum for the sort of time it take to run 5k.

This is the reasoning behind the Fartlek system of interval training.
I thought I'd heard that it was very difficult to reach maximum heart rate when swimming?
 

Niamac

GCM
I thought I'd heard that it was very difficult to reach maximum heart rate when swimming?
Not sure, never heard that. Certainly high intensity Reps over sprint distances say 8 x 50m on the minute will get the heart rate on completion of the rep pretty high. What I see in the pool i.e. people doing long slowish swims, does not stress the system much. Good for you but so is going for a brisk walk.
 
Not sure, never heard that. Certainly high intensity Reps over sprint distances say 8 x 50m on the minute will get the heart rate on completion of the rep pretty high. What I see in the pool i.e. people doing long slowish swims, does not stress the system much. Good for you but so is going for a brisk walk.
I did a sprint pyramid last night, and I can tell you, my heart was fair battering away. It must have been pretty close to max HR.
 

Niamac

GCM
I did a sprint pyramid last night, and I can tell you, my heart was fair battering away. It must have been pretty close to max HR.
Yep that's a hell of a strenuous exercise - used to be known as Russian Reps, no idea why.
 
When I was thin and fit, I wound up in an NHS hospital in need of an operation under general unaesthetic. My heart rate was 36 bpm, which apparently caused some consternation to the anesthetist who didn't know why it was that slow. I woke up in the intensive care unit with the coma patients. My next-of-kin had been informed of the concerns.

Just running, lots of running, running in boots, running in webbing, and weight training. No idea what it is now, probably three times that.

But there again I was Airborne!
That too, but I still wasn't fit enough to pass selection.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Most times I pop a heart monitor on a patient it seems to be high for some reason.
 
Most times I pop a heart monitor on a patient it seems to be high for some reason.
Hah!
In Houston, my GP's nurse always logged BP, HR and temp at each visit while I was waiting to be seen. One time she measured my BP at 160/something and was a little alarmed, I explained that straight after I was going to the dentist for the removal of an impacted wisdom tooth.
Actually, the anaesthetist at the dentists wasn't too happy either and had to give me something to calm me down before putting me under.
My normal is 125/65
 
Hah!
In Houston, my GP's nurse always logged BP, HR and temp at each visit while I was waiting to be seen. One time she measured my BP at 160/something and was a little alarmed, I explained that straight after I was going to the dentist for the removal of an impacted wisdom tooth.
Actually, the anaesthetist at the dentists wasn't too happy either and had to give me something to calm me down before putting me under.
My normal is 125/65
My missus has it in her records as "white coat syndrome". I do her BP at home and it's always around the 120/75 mark. Go to the doctor and it goes to over 150/90 every time. An hour later, at home, an it'll be back to 120/75.

Must be some super fit and highly trained athletes on here to get heart rates so low. I'm quite happy at between 60 and 70 although my BP was rising. About 3 months I gave up alcohol (yeah, I know, drastic) and stick to non alcohol beer (either Lidl or Aldi own brand which actually tastes like beer) and just a couple of Guinnesses (Guinni?) at the weekend.
BP was reading about 140/90 (which my doc said was ideal for my age - 70) but now my reading is 118/75 and she's absolutely delighted with that.
Heart rate still around the same 60 to 70, though.
 

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