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Resilience - Individual Skills

Yokel

LE
This is related to Improving National Resilience.

In a crisis of any kind, people with various backgrounds have skills and abilities that are useful, but what skills could or should we expect of every single individual?

1. Hazard recognition

Recognising dangerous situations, things like dangerous animals, potentially dangerous chemicals, or the potential to fall or be struck by objects.

2. First Aid

Minor injuries, CPR, recovery position, recognising impaired consciousness, stroke, major burns, or pregnancy. Doing what the doctor/nurse/paramedic advises.

3. Contacting the emergency services etc

Contacting the blue light services, medics, and others by appropriate means - 999 included. Including relevant information, and making written notes.

4. Fire Safety

Not overloading electrical sockets, keeping combustible things away heat sources, recognising fire, fighting small fires and recognising when not to, smoke awareness.

5. Water safety

Recognising the power of water, and the imlsct of the cold, and the need to stay out of deep water if at all possible.

6. Electrical safety

Being aware of bare conductors, high voltages, and not putting fingers and hands in shocking places.

7. Other energy sources

Understanding that powerful chemicals and pressurised gas represent potential dangerous.

8. Absence of the normal, presence of the abnormal

Flag it up! This applies to all car making an unusual sound, an unusually quiet place, a lump somewhere intimate, or someone acting out of character.

9. Recognising limits - own and others

We all have limits - ability to lift weights, distance someone can walk or swim, memory or speed of mental processing.....

10. Improvisation

From using socks to keep hands warm to repairs with duck tape, being able to think about solving problems and using what is at hand, and responding to changing circumstances, are 'war winners'.

A few of my thoughts.
 
Last edited:
This related to Improving National Resilience.

In a crisis of any kind, people with various backgrounds have skills and abilities that are useful, but what skills could or should we expect of every single individual?

1. Hazard recognition

Recognising dangerous situations, things like dangerous animals, potentially dangerous chemicals, or the potential to fall or be struck by objects.

2. First Aid

Minor injuries, CPR, recovery position, recognising impaired consciousness, stroke, major burns, or pregnancy. Doing what the doctor/nurse/paramedic advises.

3. Contacting the emergency services etc

Contacting the blue light services, medics, and others by appropriate means - 999 included. Including relevant information, and making written notes.

4. Fire Safety

Not overloading electrical sockets, keeping combustible things away heat sources, recognising fire, fighting small fires and recognising when not to, smoke awareness.

5. Water safety

Recognising the power of water, and the imlsct of the cold, and the need to stay out of deep water if at all possible.

6. Electrical safety

Being aware of bare conductors, high voltages, and not putting fingers and hands in shocking places.

7. Other energy sources

Understanding that powerful chemicals and pressurised gas represent potential dangerous.

8. Absence of the normal, presence of the abnormal

Flag it up! This applies to all car making an unusual sound, an unusually quiet place, a lump somewhere intimate, or someone acting out of character.

9. Recognising limits - own and others

We all have limits - ability to lift weights, distance someone can walk or swim, memory or speed of mental processing.....

10. Improvisation

From using socks to keep hands warm to repairs with duck tape, being able to think about solving problems and using what is at hand, and responding to changing circumstances, are 'war winners'.

A,few of my thoughts.
in old money,its called common sense.
 
You might consider adding number 11 at the bottom:

11. In the event of a hazardous situation where you have no means of escape.............
11 a. Kiss your ass goodbye
 
in old money,its called common sense.

Arguably though commonsense is based on individual prior learning (painful experiences), or the observed fate of others.

Couple of examples of that:

1. A clever man who I go to for pistol training teaches that we should "load out eye lids" meaning to keep them forced open and avoid the natural flinch that comes with a bang close to your face. He says that when we pop out of the womb we are more or less a blank piece of hardware waiting for our functional program to be written. Flinching, when something is closing in on your eyes is supposed to come about because babies quickly learn that when laying on their backs and flailing their arms and legs around and one of their hands hits them in the face. So they rapidly learn, "oh, fcuk, one of those pink flaily things is coming this way again lets close my eyelids". The behaviour then rapidly starts to happen without thinking about it consciously.

2. Back in the 60's they did an experiment called the visual cliff study with babies that could crawl. This led to a lot of other stuff which showed that babies rapidly learned what was dangerous for them and what was not.

We experience, or observe pain, we avoid doing that in the future, or adopt a different approach.
 

Yokel

LE

"Crisis du jour" should not be a way of life.

Just a reminder that just because someone loses their head every time something doesn't make them happy, it's not a "crisis" it's just an immature person having a temper tantrum.

Or, as we used to say, "If every thing is a crisis, nothing is a crisis."

Or perhaps: “When everything is a crisis and a scandal, the end result is that nothing is.”

Interesting article from Foreign Policy by Eliah Bures:


The law of crisis is that crisis-talk fuels itself: Every time a choice is pitched as life-or-death, or an institution is pronounced “in crisis,” panic and partisanship and zero-sum thinking gain ground. Use of crisis mirrors your ideological commitments. If you want to raise the temperature, then breathlessly framing your cause as a crisis will do the trick. Crisis-talk is the gas pedal, not the brakes.

Keep calm and work the problem....
 
I’d have liked ‘recognising explosive devices hid in the earth’

but no such fücking luck.
 
12. Recognize when you are digging a verbal hole for yourself, and stop.

13. Be aware that arguing with any female is useless, you will never win.

14. Do not in any way trust, politicians, lawyers, bankers, and the clergy.
 
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This related to Improving National Resilience.

In a crisis of any kind, people with various backgrounds have skills and abilities that are useful, but what skills could or should we expect of every single individual?

1. Hazard recognition

Recognising dangerous situations, things like dangerous animals, potentially dangerous chemicals, or the potential to fall or be struck by objects.

2. First Aid

Minor injuries, CPR, recovery position, recognising impaired consciousness, stroke, major burns, or pregnancy. Doing what the doctor/nurse/paramedic advises.

3. Contacting the emergency services etc

Contacting the blue light services, medics, and others by appropriate means - 999 included. Including relevant information, and making written notes.

4. Fire Safety

Not overloading electrical sockets, keeping combustible things away heat sources, recognising fire, fighting small fires and recognising when not to, smoke awareness.

5. Water safety

Recognising the power of water, and the imlsct of the cold, and the need to stay out of deep water if at all possible.

6. Electrical safety

Being aware of bare conductors, high voltages, and not putting fingers and hands in shocking places.

7. Other energy sources

Understanding that powerful chemicals and pressurised gas represent potential dangerous.

8. Absence of the normal, presence of the abnormal

Flag it up! This applies to all car making an unusual sound, an unusually quiet place, a lump somewhere intimate, or someone acting out of character.

9. Recognising limits - own and others

We all have limits - ability to lift weights, distance someone can walk or swim, memory or speed of mental processing.....

10. Improvisation

From using socks to keep hands warm to repairs with duck tape, being able to think about solving problems and using what is at hand, and responding to changing circumstances, are 'war winners'.

A,few of my thoughts.

Stabbing people at the end of a long pointy thing.

Or

Making a brew.
 
This related to Improving National Resilience.

In a crisis of any kind, people with various backgrounds have skills and abilities that are useful, but what skills could or should we expect of every single individual?

1. Hazard recognition

Recognising dangerous situations, things like dangerous animals, potentially dangerous chemicals, or the potential to fall or be struck by objects.

2. First Aid

Minor injuries, CPR, recovery position, recognising impaired consciousness, stroke, major burns, or pregnancy. Doing what the doctor/nurse/paramedic advises.

3. Contacting the emergency services etc

Contacting the blue light services, medics, and others by appropriate means - 999 included. Including relevant information, and making written notes.

4. Fire Safety

Not overloading electrical sockets, keeping combustible things away heat sources, recognising fire, fighting small fires and recognising when not to, smoke awareness.

5. Water safety

Recognising the power of water, and the imlsct of the cold, and the need to stay out of deep water if at all possible.

6. Electrical safety

Being aware of bare conductors, high voltages, and not putting fingers and hands in shocking places.

7. Other energy sources

Understanding that powerful chemicals and pressurised gas represent potential dangerous.

8. Absence of the normal, presence of the abnormal

Flag it up! This applies to all car making an unusual sound, an unusually quiet place, a lump somewhere intimate, or someone acting out of character.

9. Recognising limits - own and others

We all have limits - ability to lift weights, distance someone can walk or swim, memory or speed of mental processing.....

10. Improvisation

From using socks to keep hands warm to repairs with duck tape, being able to think about solving problems and using what is at hand, and responding to changing circumstances, are 'war winners'.

A,few of my thoughts.

You could assume that many of those things should be taught by parents, or schools. Back in the 1800's when I was at school we learnt to swim, we did fire drills, doing science taught us how to make bangy burny things chemical and substance safety. Going to cubs/scouts/brownies/guides teaches a whole collection of useful life skills, outdoor skills, and should start to show you what you should recognise as being outside the scope of your present physical ability. For me growing up involved being posted around the world so I had a breadth of opportunities presented to me, but the fundamentals came from parents, school, and cubs/scouts.
 
You could assume that many of those things should be taught by parents, or schools. Back in the 1800's when I was at school we learnt to swim, we did fire drills, doing science taught us how to make bangy burny things chemical and substance safety. Going to cubs/scouts/brownies/guides teaches a whole collection of useful life skills, outdoor skills, and should start to show you what you should recognize as being outside the scope of your present physical ability. For me growing up involved being posted around the world so I had a breadth of opportunities presented to me, but the fundamentals came from parents, school, and cubs/scouts.
What he said, plus as you mature into your middle and later years, your life skills, and awareness of all things that can-will-might balls up your day, are spotted way before they become a problem, this can not be taught at school, or by parents etc, it comes with time served.
 

happyuk

War Hero
Gardening: growing your own food, self sustainability, botany, identification of poisonous plants, identification of helpful (medicinal/wellness) plants

Tech: learn to build and repair computers, write and debug code, develop websites, operating systems, troubleshooting, use terminal/command line.

House: learn to fix things within your home: plumbing, walls, flooring, electricals, roofing, etc.

Tactical: learn situational awareness, statement analysis, body language, self defence, basic first aid

Auto: learn about combustion engines, car maintenance, and actually apply knowledge on automobiles. oil changes, brake changes, wheel bearings, tyres, again learning self reliance in many areas.
 

happyuk

War Hero
Expanding the topic a little the key to National resilience would be to radically change the way young people are being taught in schools. My mandatory curriculum would be:

History: Explain the worst behaviours of the worst totalitarians (Stalin, Mao, Hitler, Pol Pot) . Also about older historical figures like Genghis Khan, Alexander the Great, but emphasis on ACCURACY/TRUTH. How civilizations came to pass, why they fell. Nothing censored, just the teaching of history as it happened. Open discussion, not persuasion or manipulation based on personal or political bias.

Psychology/Philosophy: learn the different schools of thought. Apply those through active engagement throughout courses, etc

Reading/Writing: learn how to ACTUALLY write and have complete comprehension.

Critical thinking: learn to deal with things like logic and discern between good and bad in any situation etc.

Mathematics: dependent on career path, no unnecessary course that will not be used in life (STEM fields). Economics would be emphasized for non STEM or non-math oriented careers

Debate: Learn how to discuss/debate certain topics in an effective manner while retaining civility. Strict guidelines, no radical ideological alignments.

Sport and Exercise: do I need to explain?

Nutrition: learn everything about the macro/micronutrients we ingest. Devise diet plans based on pre-existing co-morbidities and also for themselves. Create a generation of HEALTHY individuals.

Zero Tolerance policy for violent, disrespectful or unruly students. Order & respect emphasized.
Don’t mistake this for authoritarianism, just revisiting classical respect for others and elders. All must conduct themselves in a collaborative manner.
 
Arguably though commonsense is based on individual prior learning (painful experiences), or the observed fate of others.
I’ve always figured that common sense is something that a person can reasonably be expected to infer from available information.
It‘s commonly used to cover specific knowledge that cannot be reasonably inferred, which irks me no end.
Mathematics: dependent on career path, no unnecessary course that will not be used in life (STEM fields). Economics would be emphasized for non STEM or non-math oriented careers
Curious as to what branches of mathematics people think are unnecessary.
I don’t recall covering specific stuff like mechanics and calculus until A-levels, which are discretionary anyway.

Maybe some of the more advanced algebra? Trouble is then you are limiting those who will go on to STEM careers.
 
Arguably though commonsense is based on individual prior learning (painful experiences), or the observed fate of others.

Couple of examples of that:

1. A clever man who I go to for pistol training teaches that we should "load out eye lids" meaning to keep them forced open and avoid the natural flinch that comes with a bang close to your face. He says that when we pop out of the womb we are more or less a blank piece of hardware waiting for our functional program to be written. Flinching, when something is closing in on your eyes is supposed to come about because babies quickly learn that when laying on their backs and flailing their arms and legs around and one of their hands hits them in the face. So they rapidly learn, "oh, fcuk, one of those pink flaily things is coming this way again lets close my eyelids". The behaviour then rapidly starts to happen without thinking about it consciously.

2. Back in the 60's they did an experiment called the visual cliff study with babies that could crawl. This led to a lot of other stuff which showed that babies rapidly learned what was dangerous for them and what was not.

We experience, or observe pain, we avoid doing that in the future, or adopt a different approach.
That's a really long-winded way of saying 'you learn from experience and experience starts at birth'.
 
That's a really long-winded way of saying 'you learn from experience and experience starts at birth'.

True, but commonsense told me to drop in a couple of examples:).
 
Gardening: growing your own food, self sustainability, botany, identification of poisonous plants, identification of helpful (medicinal/wellness) plants

Tech: learn to build and repair computers, write and debug code, develop websites, operating systems, troubleshooting, use terminal/command line.

House: learn to fix things within your home: plumbing, walls, flooring, electricals, roofing, etc.

Tactical: learn situational awareness, statement analysis, body language, self defence, basic first aid

Auto: learn about combustion engines, car maintenance, and actually apply knowledge on automobiles. oil changes, brake changes, wheel bearings, tyres, again learning self reliance in many areas.

History: Explain the worst behaviours of the worst totalitarians (Stalin, Mao, Hitler, Pol Pot) . Also about older historical figures like Genghis Khan, Alexander the Great, but emphasis on ACCURACY/TRUTH. How civilizations came to pass, why they fell. Nothing censored, just the teaching of history as it happened. Open discussion, not persuasion or manipulation based on personal or political bias.

Psychology/Philosophy: learn the different schools of thought. Apply those through active engagement throughout courses, etc

Reading/Writing: learn how to ACTUALLY write and have complete comprehension.

Critical thinking: learn to deal with things like logic and discern between good and bad in any situation etc.

Mathematics: dependent on career path, no unnecessary course that will not be used in life (STEM fields). Economics would be emphasized for non STEM or non-math oriented careers

Debate: Learn how to discuss/debate certain topics in an effective manner while retaining civility. Strict guidelines, no radical ideological alignments.

Sport and Exercise: do I need to explain?

Nutrition: learn everything about the macro/micronutrients we ingest. Devise diet plans based on pre-existing co-morbidities and also for themselves. Create a generation of HEALTHY individuals.

Zero Tolerance policy for violent, disrespectful or unruly students. Order & respect emphasized.
Don’t mistake this for authoritarianism, just revisiting classical respect for others and elders. All must conduct themselves in a collaborative manner.
And once you've done all that you may wish to get a life.
 
9. Recognising limits - own and others

We all have limits - ability to lift weights, distance someone can walk or swim, memory or speed of mental processing.....

I don't like this one. I think many people - myself included - don't realise what our limits actually are.

And historically, people like Roger Banister broke the 4 min mile, which many believed to be a limit no-one could break. Two weeks after he broke the 4 min mile, someone else did it. Then loads of people did it.

Banister showed them there wasn't this arbitrary limit.

My missis is 5 foot fvck all and ran/walked pretty much non stop for 3 days in a race, coving 185 miles across a whole country; mostly off road and it included some very tough terrain. She's having a go at a 250 mile non-stop race from Anglesey to Cardiff in a race later this year and I reckon she'll do it because she's nails.

She doesn't recognise what her physical limits are, which gives her more scope to go further, faster, than those who believe they're limited.
 
You could assume that many of those things should be taught by parents, or schools. Back in the 1800's when I was at school we learnt to swim, we did fire drills, doing science taught us how to make bangy burny things chemical and substance safety. Going to cubs/scouts/brownies/guides teaches a whole collection of useful life skills, outdoor skills, and should start to show you what you should recognise as being outside the scope of your present physical ability. For me growing up involved being posted around the world so I had a breadth of opportunities presented to me, but the fundamentals came from parents, school, and cubs/scouts.
How old are you?
 
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Yokel

LE
And once you've done all that you may wish to get a life.

Harsh! You do have a point - doing all that would use so much time it would make a job, a relationship, and social activities hard. I was intending a list of things for being able to avoid common accidents and to be of use if you encounter one.

I don't like this one. I think many people - myself included - don't realise what our limits actually are.

And historically, people like Roger Banister broke the 4 min mile, which many believed to be a limit no-one could break. Two weeks after he broke the 4 min mile, someone else did it. Then loads of people did it.

Banister showed them there wasn't this arbitrary limit.

My missis is 5 foot fvck all and ran/walked pretty much non stop for 3 days in a race, coving 185 miles across a whole country; mostly off road and it included some very tough terrain. She's having a go at a 250 mile non-stop race from Anglesey to Cardiff in a race later this year and I reckon she'll do it because she's nails.

She doesn't recognise what her physical limits are, which gives her more scope to go further, faster, than those who believe they're limited.

It was intended in the spirit of "do not become a casualty yourself"!
 
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