Resettlement... Rope Access, courses and employability?

Discussion in 'Education and Resettlement Courses' started by Danm9, Oct 20, 2010.

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  1. Hey everyone..

    I am researching resettlement courses at the moment, hoping to break into the rope access industry (onshore or offshore).. havent actually signed off yet, In todays climate i want to make sure I am actually going to be able to find work to pay the mortgage before taking the plunge!

    Does anybody have any experience of rope access? if so, what qualifications would you recommend for a new starter? how difficult is it to find work (on a permanent basis and freelance)

    I have been reading quite a bit on rope access jobs, rope access companies, rope access training equipment suppliers. Also covering rigging, inspection and ndt , very helpful on there, but i wondered if anyone could give me their account of resettlement into emplyment?

    Cheers
     
  2. Technicians working in Industrial Rope Access onshore and offshore worldwide can achieve a lucrative career, given the correct qualifications. The IRATA (Industrial Rope Access Trade Association) Level 1 Rope Access ticket is the best place to start as it offers a truly global qualification which enables the technician to work anywhere.

    It’s a bit like getting the bus to work though so you will need other skills and qualifications to compliment your Rope Access qualifications. Your background skills will determine how easy or difficult maintaining a career will be. If you are already working, or have worked in the past? What types of skills did you pick up? Likewise, have you done any courses in another type of industry that could be relevant to work that will be done using Rope Access?
     
  3. Technicians working in Industrial Rope Access onshore and offshore worldwide can achieve a lucrative career, given the correct qualifications. The IRATA (Industrial Rope Access Trade Association) Level 1 Rope Access ticket is the best place to start as it offers a truly global qualification which enables the technician to work anywhere.

    It’s a bit like getting the bus to work though so you will need other skills and qualifications to compliment your Rope Access qualifications. Your background skills will determine how easy or difficult maintaining a career will be. If you are already working, or have worked in the past? What types of skills did you pick up? Likewise, have you done any courses in another type of industry that could be relevant to work that will be done using Rope Access?
     
  4. Don't you just love Copy & Paste postings!

    I know the square root of **** all about the job (is it the same as the industrial climber?) but just had to comment on the above load of shite.

    More coffee needed I think.
     
  5. Dope-on-a-Rope or RATs as they are known need a broad skill base to do their jobs. Their reason d'etre is to save the operators money by doing away with the need for expensive scaffolding for simple inspection/maintenance/repair jobs.

    Preferably you'll need some basic mechanical skills, righty'tighty, lefty-loosey stuff so you can unbolt/bolt-up flanges, nuts & bolts thingies, preferably some basic electrical skills so's you can change a lightbulb and most commonly NDT skills so's you can do integrity inspections on the structures & pipework. You need to be FIT, I've never seen any unfit, fat ***** hanging from the ropes.

    Job opportunities can be limited!
    If you're considering offshore work, there are probably better opportunities in other disciplines. One such discipline is Production Operator, every Production platform has at least 6 and the career path can be fairly fast. Starting salary is in excess of £40k with a common rota of 2 weeks on/3 weeks off.
    Best entry route would be to do a distance learning course in Oilfield Production Operations (eg. POL course POL - Module Titles - Petroleum Processing Technology Series), get your Offshore Survival certificates and get on with an agency.
     
  6. OPITO would love you to believe that (your link) but it's simply not true and if they are leading anybody to believe it then it's nothing short of immoral. Do not waste your money on offshore training until you are in a position to demonstrate "competency" without it you have absolutely no chance of getting a job offshore, zero, zip, zilch. There is a good reason for that, every single one of the client organisations have signed up to an agreement that they will ensure all technical staff (including operators) are competent, not just trained. Competency means you have demonstrated training, experience and appropriate behaviours and been assessed, the main route into production operations is via an apprenticeship although some get picked up from refinery type work. The best way to get into an offshore career is to get qualified in your chosen field (mechanical maintenance, specialist critical bolting, small bore instrument pipework and NDT are all currently highly sought technical skills although there are others) get a related on shore job first and build your CV, build contacts and develop skills the job will come naturally. There are few exceptions to this unfortunately and all of them very niche, with all the redundancies in and around Teesside over the last couple of years there are thousands of very experienced oil and gas industry engineers sat on their arses looking for well paid work in and around Aberdeen and Norwich. The competition is huge but the work is picking up and it's only a few years before the North Sea decommissioning projects properly kick off when there should be plenty of work (for a few years at least).
     
  7. Wow you're negative!

    As for apprenticeship entry to Offshore Production operations being the main way, I would say maybe true 20-30 years ago but not so much these days. I know very many offshore Production Techs with no apprenticeship training, lots of them ex-services.
    Last year my friend's son came out of the RAF, as an Aircraft Electrician, did a couple of modules of his POL through Open learning, did his survival ticket and is now offshore in the North sea as a Production Tech on an FPSO. It is quite possible to do this! It does help if you have some contacts, as in all jobs it's more of who you know than what you know.
     
  8. Not negative, realistic. Your last sentence is the most important one here especially with regards to lucrative offshore work of any sort, I have genuinely lost count of the number of ex-service people - often non technical sadly - who have come to me for advice about getting offshore with an explanation that they have blown their resettlement time and money on well advertised training courses by companies claiming to guarantee offshore work "opportunities', sharlatans the lot of them. This is well paid work undoubtedly, highly skilled in the main yet application numbers are huge and they can afford to be as picky as they want. If your best mate ain't the OIM or influential in maintenance shutdown in the case of contractors you are going to have to supply a competitive CV via a competitive recruitment process, sadly if that CV does not illustrate experience of some sort you will normally be shredded at the cv filter stage. A training course is unlikely to get you a job in isolation, no matter how expensive or well respected that training course may be.
     
  9. A lot of what you say is correct But I know quite a few guys who have followed my advice and having gained a few modules of the OPITO Petroleum Open Learning courses & their Survival tickets have managed to get jobs in the offshore oil game. Show the company that you are willing to: better yourself, learn and show committment to the job and they will quite often take a risk on you. I can tell you that an Ex-forces guys who shows these committments will be considered above non ex-forces guys. We know that most ex-forces guys can handle the self-discipline required for the job.

    PS ChiefTiff, are you working offshore? If so, where & what as?
     
  10. No I'm not, my job is to assist on and offshore (up and downstream) engineering contractors (all of them, I work for one of their representative bodies) in recruitment and training of their technical staff by designing and developing that training and developing strategy to get people in a position of competence to be employable on and offshore. I'm guessing you work for OPITO?

    Incidentally I'm not being critical of what OPITO offer here, they are a great organisation with some great training programmes I'm not sure though that the message about training being only one small step in the employability ladder is clear and implicit in this instance.
     
  11. Nope don't work for them, I'm just an old Production guy on an FPSO.
     
  12. Thanks for the replies, and apologies for my delay..

    I have spent hours upon hours researching, networking and digging for advice, contacts and jobs, and doing the relevent courses.

    In the past couple of months, I have definitely found out that it is WHO you know, not WHAT you know, and if you havent got experience, even getting looked at is a long shot.
    Having said that, if anyone is reading this considering the same as me, be persistant. After sending my CV (Which IMO is worthy of a second glance) to well over 100 places, and getting Nil response, any success I have had is purely down to making friends in the
    business.

    Still a couple of courses to do, but been told I have a job waiting for me, which, to be honest, is more out of luck by having spoken to the right person at the right time.

    To anyone who is considering it, there is a chance you could spend 000's and end up getting nowhere, but on the other hand, if you remain determined and persistant, you may end up getting lucky.
     
  13. I have NVQ 3 Engineering maintenance (through Fitter utilities and petroleum course, which unfortunatley, although does cover a lot in great detail, doesnt come up with a specific qual), working in confined spaces high risk, rescue and overseeing work, and emergency first aid at work (all courtesy of the army)

    Recently completed IRATA Level 1, OPITO rigging and lifting, RenewableUK wind turbine rescue, and will be doing BOSIET, medical and CCNSG / CSCS as soon as I can afford it... expensive courses!
     
  14. Has anyone ever considered telling some porkies about the courses you have done on your CV, just to get an interview. If you get the job then you can go and do the courses before your first trip. If you get found out at interview and they ask to see your certs then just come clean and say you lied just to get the interview, and that you are willing to self sponsor if you get the job, you just couldn't afford to waste the money if you spent it and got nowhere like so many have before. That is what happened to me, the interviewers must have agreed with my point of view because I got the job.