Resettlement, how valuable is it.

#1
Evening all

Following on from some question I've been asking

I'm in the process of NTT and have interview with 2ic next week to confirm all details and then 7 clicks to civvi street.

I was wondering how valuable resettlement actually is. I've done 9 years service and am entitled higher tier ELC but what does resettlemt offer, I know the grant is around 500 but what else is offered. Is there great advantages doing the full resettlement rather than getting some courses myself using my ELC and SLC. I've been unable to get any resettlemtn info of many people in work this week due to most been away on exercise etc

Thanks in advance as always
 
#2
I've fucked my resettlement off. £550 is fuckall and I can't be arsed to wait around, have loads of **** interviews, lectures and generally get fucked about. Early release and bye bye for me.
 
#3
Resettlement is useful if you do your research and have time to organise it all. I did 4 weeks in Egypt full food and accommodation doing a diving instructors course, i will probably never teach anyone to dive but to get 4 weeks diving in the red sea courtesy of the system was well worth it. On the serious side, the grant isnt much but when coupled, correctly, with the subsistence allowances you can get on some cracking courses. Have a good chat with the resettlement Officer, they were great with me.
 
P

PrinceAlbert

Guest
#4
It depends on what you want to do in civvy strasse, and whether you can get another skill through resettlement? My resettlement course was £2500 and the Army stumped up for it. The £500 goes further than you think when the course suppliers factor in accomodation etc.
 
#5
Does resettlement cover accommodation/food etc cause the courses I've been looking at must include accommodation through them so they are making more money, but from who me or the service ??

Another quick one is, can I apply and get a course payed for from this finicial years ELC but not planning the course until after April maybe even later in the year I just want to try and use this years ELC
 
#7
Thus far I have used none of my financial grant or resettlement time. Whether you do will depend entirely on what job you intend to look for and what quals you already have.

My plan is to use all of my leave/GRT/terminal leave to either have a nice long paid break or to gain work experience. The final decision is dependent on two job intereviews I have lined up.
 
P

PrinceAlbert

Guest
#8
My resettlement got me a qualification that I wouldn't have otherwise had. The qualification got me the interview, which got me the job.

So, all in all, I owe my whole new career to my resettlement.
 
#12
Resettlement is a complete joke. £534 for 22 years loyal service is frankly insulting. I binned resettlement completely and started work as an IT contractor instead, making about 20 grand over the same period. A no brainer really. On top of my gratuity, it was very nice indeed.
 
#14
Chinned resettlement off after sitting through the dire CTW workshops for 3 days. Waste of time. Didn't complete any resettlement courses nor took any resettlement leave. WO2 on a Friday to a civvie no-mark **** on the Monday. 2 years out now into my 3rd job. 1st one was shite, 2nd one went under due to redundancy and lets just hope this one lasts longer.
 
#15
I did ok out of it. I got a resettlement grant plus my annual education grant to do a 6 week data comms course in Plymouth. We stayed on a Royal Navy base, and drove into the college every day. A hard, intensive course, working til 2300hrs every night, but spent the weekends there on the lash in Union Street and the Barbican, getting hold of some top local totty, and nicking a Royal Marine's lass off him.


Had a few resettlement briefs as well, cv writing, job hunting, interview skills, all that stuff. We had a really good resettlement centre as well. Left with no job to go to, but soon got one via an agency. I even got a job HGV driving just to pay the bills while i was waiting to start the telecoms job.

During the early 90s, there was a tv drama series called Civvies, starring Jason Issacs as an ex-Para Regt sergeant and his mates who were trying to make it in civvy street, and not doing very well. Ending up dead, in jail or in debt.
 
#16
As one who has served way outside the mainstream for the last decade (but also done the usual operational tours) and with several civilian degrees and post-graduate qualifications, I didn't think that I would get much out of the resettlement programme. I found the CTW to be useful; it certainly sharpened my CV skills and gave a further boost to my networking. I did several civilian courses unrelated to future employment but they are nonetheless useful and (for me) interesting - plumbing, for instance.

Unless you have an immediate job lined up, use the resettlement programme; as pointed out by several posters, your first 'dream' job outside of the Services may not be all that you had hoped for or you could be made redundant. My advice is to garner the widest skill set that is available in order to cover that eventuality.
 
#17
My resettlement got me a qualification that I wouldn't have otherwise had. The qualification got me the interview, which got me the job.

So, all in all, I owe my whole new career to my resettlement.
Likewise.

Dont throw it away unless you are confident you will get the job you want. Mind you 4 weeks becoming a divemaster in the Med would have been my second choice.
RC
 
#18
My resettlement consisted of several day briefings, a couple of 2 day seminars and a 6 week course at Plymouth. The one day briefings were things like civvy-fying your CV (excellent and extremely useful) where jobs were and what would be available with my quals (or lack thereof) and useful, what to get out of the Army before you leave (dental work as well as the advantages of commutation/non-commutation) and also very useful. Financial planning and which mortgage companies were sympathetic to the Forces and so on.Two days seminars were attended by reps from big companies like BT, Lever Brothers, Public Service Unions etc. Some useful but some not so useful depending on what you were looking for at the end. The 6 week course at Plymouth was to consolidate all the IT skills learnt but not given official recognition by the Army. At the end of it a BTEC was awarded. All in all, very useful but look at the resettlement bulletins which lists any courses available, look at the bit at the end of P2 orders which sometimes list upcoming day briefings etc. You have to do a bit of work yourself so, unless you've been promised the super job you have always been looking for (CEO of ICI has already been taken) then use it to your benefit. Anyone who thinks they know it all and can do without the advice provided is probably fooling themselves. You can always pick up a good tip or two regardless of how clever you are (or think you are).
 
#19
As one who has served way outside the mainstream for the last decade (but also done the usual operational tours) and with several civilian degrees and post-graduate qualifications, I didn't think that I would get much out of the resettlement programme. I found the CTW to be useful; it certainly sharpened my CV skills and gave a further boost to my networking. I did several civilian courses unrelated to future employment but they are nonetheless useful and (for me) interesting - plumbing, for instance.

Unless you have an immediate job lined up, use the resettlement programme; as pointed out by several posters, your first 'dream' job outside of the Services may not be all that you had hoped for or you could be made redundant. My advice is to garner the widest skill set that is available in order to cover that eventuality.
Bold - This can't be understated enough. If anything, the only thing I brought away from the CTW workshop, was to have a CV to get you noticed. In the first 6 months after I left, I sent out approx. 10-15 cold call letters (incl. CV) to companies within in a local large business park. I got two jobs out of it. One was within the week, the other was when my letter was held on file and pulled some months later. I was the only one interviewed and took a £4k increase from the previous job. For both positions I was told it was my CV that clinched it.

Deciding which resettlement courses to do are based on two factors; there's the 'Do I need a accredited qualification to obtain the job I want?' type, and the 'No tangible qualification, but good experience to blag the interview' one.

The first one is a no-brainer fo the right job. However, the second can be a waste of time and effort, but might just give you the civvie-speak to get you a job offer. Every leaver should think carefully and ask themselves which one do they fit into.
 
#20
Just like sex, if its free, take everything that you can get. If not you may regret it later.

Good luck
 

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