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Resettlement - best and worst advice

#1
Just interested in what the best and worst advice you heard in your last two years of resettlement

From a Sapper on resettlement course; "lefty loosey, righty tighty". Great for reassembling my Ikea furniture in my poxy little flat.
 
#2
Stay away from Ritchies in Scotland - the kit is all ancient. The forks I was using kept breaking down, so I hardly received any training, despite receiving a 'pass'. My friend took his HGV training in the same cab for two weeks, then they gave him a different one for the test!!! He failed - shock! But even worse was that he got a bollocking off of old man Ritchie for failing!

Also the crane I was learning on kept breaking down and slipping out of gear and the load break didn't work properly!!!

STAY AWAY STAY AWAY STAY AWAY!!!
 
#3
On the matter of forks/stacker trucks, I really wouldn't bother. Pay for the course yourself, Its much cheeper. Spend your money on something much better. Stacker truck driving is shite, anyway the money is bot!
 
#5
fishfingers said:
Just interested in what the best and worst advice you heard in your last two years of resettlement

There is substantial funding available for resettlement anywhere in the world.

Enter some key words/phrases into a search engine ie 'resettlement diving' (or whatever your choice is) & see what comes up.


HTH
 
#6
Worst advice given (by my RAO): "do not worry, the process is smooth and you will be given leave if you get a job early" - utter b0lloxs! I had a job as a consultant come up with a start date 3 weeks before my end of service date. I was still owed 2 weeks leave but the CO ordered me to go on exercise up until the last moment - literally my last day in the Army was spent on a Bde CPX in Germany, with me wearing civvies (I had handed back all my uniform and had the paperwork to prove it!). Total cnut (he was furious that I bailed out in time to avoid Batus and the disaster that was SS2 in Oman). And yes, I lost the job offer (probably the best thing that happened in fairness looking back).

Best advice (given to me by a Col, ex-Deputy DSF): "fcuk em and tell them all to p1ss off"
 
#7
Listen to your re-settlement officer, but not too hard. Chances are he\she has never done a days work outside of the army in their life. Try and choose a career outside of your army experience (that way you can always fall back on it) and try to avoid fad employment. When I left in 2000 it was Microsoft MCSE and cabling quals everyone was doing, but a year later things quietened down in those sectors and the jobs were scarce, yet many were still doing the courses. Try and look to an area that is upcoming and that you feel interested in as there is no point speding 30-odd years doing a job you hate.
 
#8
The assessment on my resettlement was summarised by the guru as meaning I should look for a job herding sheep on the far away side of Wagga Wagga miles away from any other human being. I went into a very much people-oriented job in UK and now get a nice large occupational pension so - so much for the resettlement advice.
 
#10
Got to be careful how you break down the costs. I think its another way of the MOD screwing you for every penny.

There something like 3400£ avaiable for every bod undergoing resettlement but your lucky if you see all of it. Only certain portions can go on certain things.

A certain amount of the total must and can only be spent on training, some can only be spent on food and acom, some only on examinations (or is that ECDL?)

I had a course nicely priced at 3300£ but because of the breakdown of coasts only got about 2500, had to pay the rest. Stupid really, if they say the moneys there then they should give it to us.

Anyone have any dramas with housing? Just out of interest what is the party line on where you go if you cant go anywhere else?
Luckily I had a family home to regroup at but when I asked about alternatives I got a leaflet for the YMCA and Spaces....
 
#11
Dread said:
Worst advice given (by my RAO): "do not worry, the process is smooth and you will be given leave if you get a job early" - utter b0lloxs! I had a job as a consultant come up with a start date 3 weeks before my end of service date. I was still owed 2 weeks leave but the CO ordered me to go on exercise up until the last moment - literally my last day in the Army was spent on a Bde CPX in Germany, with me wearing civvies (I had handed back all my uniform and had the paperwork to prove it!). Total cnut (he was furious that I bailed out in time to avoid Batus and the disaster that was SS2 in Oman). And yes, I lost the job offer (probably the best thing that happened in fairness looking back).

Best advice (given to me by a Col, ex-Deputy DSF): "fcuk em and tell them all to p1ss off"
Dread, I feel that the same treatment that you received was doled out to me. I had my leaving mess do in BAOR then hit the ferry the following morning like a bat out of hell for the UK. Arrived at Ash Vale only to be told that I was being employed as Provost Sgt for three weeks. I had new kit issued and was informed that "The RAMC's needs outweigh your personal agenda!"
Lost my place on my reset cse in Plymouth and had to wait for the next. Complained in writing to the Adjt, Reset Offr and OC. Told that jobs are easy to get on leaving!!!! WTF!!
Finally managed to get on my course and after four weeks was picked up by the Naval Regulators in Plymouth, having been posted as AWOL by my unit. Missed work attechment and practical tests. Spent two days under mess arrest and only was released by intervention of a family barrister. Very sucessful in lawsuit against MOD for false imprisonment, arrest and malicious prosecution.
I have never had a leaving medical from the forces either........wonder will they invite me back for one??? :?

The reset Officer really was nice however really didn't have a clue about civilian life. Gave out the regulatory pamphlets like confetti and made some pretense at trying to understand the pressure.

Did my own research and admin. :D

Rant is now officially over. Thank you RAMC......NOT :x


fastmedic
 
#12
I have never had a leaving medical from the forces either........wonder will they invite me back for one???
Mine went something like this:

Nurse - Do you feel allright?
Me - Yes
Nurse - Bye then

That we about it, oh! and I had to blow into a tube. Not terribly thorough.
 
#13
Don't wait until resettlement time to start! Make use of the funding that is available for annual education, do some distance learning stuff. If you can, work with the OU, you will be amazed how well you can manage time to get your work done (I managed a Level 2 and a Level 3 course in '03 on the Ark Royal, a couple of courses in Bedfordshire, and the hardest course was the one when I was living at home!)

The earlier you start prepping, the better you will be placed when it comes to actual "resettlement time". I have a BA(Hons) and start Teacher Training next year - the OU course was instrumental in getting a place because it showed ability to study independently - something we all do! You need self-confidence as well - as an SNCO equiv I am better qualified than most of the the Officers around me now, they are all scrabbling for the MBA courses!

If you don't want OU, then look at Adult Ed courses around you. Just don't wait until the last minute, or until the Resettlement Officer calls you forward for the interview! I have a friend who is qual'd up, and is now spending his resettlement time doing a 4 week logistics attachment at DisneyWorld - all funded by the mob! I know guys who have gone diving in Israel, studying "golf course management" in the US - and all these guys were already qualified for their next jobs, they were just abusing the system for a change. Me? Civilian work attachments at a school 4 minutes from my front door, no duties, no hassle, no being messed around for 7 weeks in addition to leave!
 
#14
Was working in the squadron headquarters for the last couple of weeks after getting back from Bosnia when I asked my YofS for time off to go to an interview, the reply was 'Suppose so but when will it stop'. He was a bit shocked when I told him I was out the following week. This was about the time when I got asked if I would like to go to NZ for 6 months if I signed back on.

One thing to watch out for though. There are a lot of resettlement training companies out there run by ex forces. They know exactly how much you are entitled to and will take every penny while not quite delivering what they promise.
 
#15
PompeySailor said:
Don't wait until resettlement time to start! Make use of the funding that is available for annual education, do some distance learning stuff. If you can, work with the OU, you will be amazed how well you can manage time to get your work done (I managed a Level 2 and a Level 3 course in '03 on the Ark Royal, a couple of courses in Bedfordshire, and the hardest course was the one when I was living at home!)

The earlier you start prepping, the better you will be placed when it comes to actual "resettlement time". I have a BA(Hons) and start Teacher Training next year - the OU course was instrumental in getting a place because it showed ability to study independently - something we all do! You need self-confidence as well - as an SNCO equiv I am better qualified than most of the the Officers around me now, they are all scrabbling for the MBA courses!

If you don't want OU, then look at Adult Ed courses around you. Just don't wait until the last minute, or until the Resettlement Officer calls you forward for the interview! I have a friend who is qual'd up, and is now spending his resettlement time doing a 4 week logistics attachment at DisneyWorld - all funded by the mob! I know guys who have gone diving in Israel, studying "golf course management" in the US - and all these guys were already qualified for their next jobs, they were just abusing the system for a change. Me? Civilian work attachments at a school 4 minutes from my front door, no duties, no hassle, no being messed around for 7 weeks in addition to leave!
It's a lot harder in the army to do distance learning. With tours you simply cannot allocate or guarentee you will have the time to do courses, and with many doing tours in their last 12 months it is quite hard to predict you will not be deployed at short notice scuppering any chance you have in completing something you have started.
 
#16
Speedy said:
PompeySailor said:
Don't wait until resettlement time to start! Make use of the funding that is available for annual education, do some distance learning stuff. If you can, work with the OU, you will be amazed how well you can manage time to get your work done (I managed a Level 2 and a Level 3 course in '03 on the Ark Royal, a couple of courses in Bedfordshire, and the hardest course was the one when I was living at home!)

The earlier you start prepping, the better you will be placed when it comes to actual "resettlement time". I have a BA(Hons) and start Teacher Training next year - the OU course was instrumental in getting a place because it showed ability to study independently - something we all do! You need self-confidence as well - as an SNCO equiv I am better qualified than most of the the Officers around me now, they are all scrabbling for the MBA courses!

If you don't want OU, then look at Adult Ed courses around you. Just don't wait until the last minute, or until the Resettlement Officer calls you forward for the interview! I have a friend who is qual'd up, and is now spending his resettlement time doing a 4 week logistics attachment at DisneyWorld - all funded by the mob! I know guys who have gone diving in Israel, studying "golf course management" in the US - and all these guys were already qualified for their next jobs, they were just abusing the system for a change. Me? Civilian work attachments at a school 4 minutes from my front door, no duties, no hassle, no being messed around for 7 weeks in addition to leave!
It's a lot harder in the army to do distance learning. With tours you simply cannot allocate or guarentee you will have the time to do courses, and with many doing tours in their last 12 months it is quite hard to predict you will not be deployed at short notice scuppering any chance you have in completing something you have started.
I managed it in Canada - we were working fourteen hour days on the area, than I was studying for a couple of hours every night. Also, the OU are pretty good at giving extensions. And I felt that I had it quite easy to some of my fellow students (e.g. on the Summer School, I met a single parent with three young children who managed to study). It all depends on how motivated you are.
 
#17
MadMag676 said:
One thing to watch out for though. There are a lot of resettlement training companies out there run by ex forces. They know exactly how much you are entitled to and will take every penny while not quite delivering what they promise.
That is very good advice. I spent most of my entitlement on a bone rigging course that qualified me for basically naff all. You really need to plan your exit strategy years in advance. Start milking your education grants now before you sign off. I dont know what redress you have if you start getting messed around by your seniors but try and get everything in writing if you feel you may have a grievance.

Once you have left the gates and handed back your ID card YOU ARE ON YOUR OWN. I cant stress that enough. You have to look after number one because nobody else will.
 
#18
MadMag676 said:
One thing to watch out for though. There are a lot of resettlement training companies out there run by ex forces. They know exactly how much you are entitled to and will take every penny while not quite delivering what they promise.

That works 2 ways; there are some that will help you to help yourself using your full entitlements.
 
#19
MY resettlement officer was the station education officer, I'd be surprised if he'd ever been in anything but the forces. Everyone on the briefings was there as a skive and they all thought they were going to walk into the job of their choice in civvy strasse

Fools


MY advice to anyone in is this.

If you're a singly in the block then don't piss all your cash up against the wall, get a mortagage and buy a small house/flat whatever and rent it out. You know those long night shifts where you just watch the adult channel and flick bogies into the staffys mug ? Stop being a **** and educate yourself with some distance learning stuff. I did nine years in the mob, when I joined I thought it was forever, its not , its a ******* short time
 
#20
If you have a cracking boss who supports you - then great get on and do something fkn useful before you leave because once that last army pay cheque hits your account you really are fkn alone. No-one will find a job for you, get as many e-mail contacts as you possibly can - mobile numbers are great but susceptible to changing.
Unfortunately for me - my bitch of a boss at the time insisted I spend my time in the Electronic Learning Centre rather than giving me time to complete the financial quals I was doing in the block on my PC. So I completed almost all of the ELC quals I could find in my last 6 months. Unfortunately the numerous certificates I accumulated don't seem to count for jack with a Civvie employer. I did argue my case but to no avail. A lot really does depend on your unit and the attitude of the personnel within as to how supportive they are.
I read here a few time of people being sent on ops in their last 6 months. Horrific really considering the uphill climb it can take to get a job.
There are many many forces initiatives available for those leaving. But, I found the admin office personnel and your line manager really determine who much benefit you can derive unless you really kick up a fuss. I just wish I had been more aggressive but I was worried about charges of insubordination, cancelling my leave and terminal leave etc so I just accepted that in my unit there was very little help available.
It so happens my admin SGT at my last post was a downgraded signals bloke now doing admin work who had a serious chip on his shoulder. He was rude, unhelpful and obnoxious. If I had been spoken to in civvie street the way he had spoken to me when I was a full screw I would have filled his big fkn mouth with my fist - he was a shockingly ignorant cnut (working in Cheltenham about 2 years ago if anyones interested) - but what do you do?? Looking back it makes me very angry that I was denied a lot of what would have helped. The other side is 'you signed on the line....' which seems to be the get out clause of so many military negatives. The lack of support and help after I had signed off really left a bitter taste. It re-inforced my poor perception of the military.

Best advice on here is to plan as far ahead as you possibly can. I rememer speaking to a girl in the RAF pay section who was doing her accountancy exams and would be finished in three years which at the time I though 'Fk - 3 years??? bollox to that' But those three years have long past and she has probably signd off and has a nice salaried position in civvie street now.
Don't wait for you resettlement - its no golden chalice - it can help but the more you supplement it beforehand the better you will fair on the outside.
And as others have mentioned - you should start saving beforehand be it a mortgage, ISA's - just a bloody savings account - give yourself something for when you leave.

I took the 1st job I was offered - it sounded great! Bonus at £35k another bonus at £50k - truth was the highest earner in that job was on about £22k.
Perhaps if I'd had more cash available to shop around I would have found something more suitable.
I sorely underestimated how difficult it would be to find something I would be good at which would pay somewhere in the region of what I was earning in the forces. I am still happier for leaving but see now that the treatment you can expect from a lot of companies is just as bad - if not worse than what you get in the forces.
 

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