Reserve officer minimum overseas deployment timescale

Evening all,

Apologies if this subject has been posted in a similar vein before, but google isn't helping a lot.

I'm considering signing up as a reservist officer. I am quite keen for overseas deployment, but it will be difficult to do both the commissioning/training then deployment within a one year period, as I am self employed.

I'm just wondering what the typical timescale for overseas deployment is post-comissioning? I can probably sacrifice around 3 months in the first year, however as I understand it most deployments tend to be 6-12 months.

On some literature I've found it seems to imply that the first overseas tour won't be for 3 years - is this always the case? Would it vary by unit? One particular unit I was interested in was the intel corps. -however I am also aware there are no guarantees for passing selection for a particular unit.

I appreciate this is something that a recruiter could probably answer, but I'm also acutely aware that sometimes I might not always get the straight skinny on what's really happening, especially with reservists playing a greater role under 2020.

Lastly, I understand currently the situation is volunteers are taken before compulsory mobilisation - (before anyone tunes me in I do intend to volunteer -but a potential 15 months straight commitment, given basic/comissioning and pre deployment beforehand - would financially ruin me, hence me wanting to commission one year and volunteer the next!) - are compulsory mobilisations taking place yet? Do they take place ad hoc, or when deployed reserve numbers across the board are too low?

Thanks in advance for your input.
 

CRmeansCeilingReached

ADC
Moderator
I would suggest that the chances of your being compulsorily mobilised, in your first year of service, are about the same as Manchester United's chances of winning the Premiership this year.

Your desire to deploy, or not, will be an absolute key factor in your future mobilisation. It isn't conscription, and we are not at war (at the moment anyway).
 

sup rec

LE
Book Reviewer
Evening all,

I appreciate this is something that a recruiter could probably answer, but I'm also acutely aware that sometimes I might not always get the straight skinny on what's really happening, especially with reservists playing a greater role under 2020..

So does this mean that you don't believe a recruiter (which the Army no longer has) will give you accurate or honest answers.

Bearing in mind you are no longer even interviewed by 'recruiters' (now careers advisers, Reserve Liaison officers or recruit co-ordinators) any more. The interview (such as it is for reserves now) is conducted by the unit you want to join.
 
Sup rec, I'm referring to the chap in the recruiting office. I went with some initial questions and he seemed pretty vague at best. Not calling them liars, but perhaps more interested in getting people in than answering 100% accurately. Do you have any input regarding my questions? Thanks.
 

sup rec

LE
Book Reviewer
Go back to the careers office and ask to speak to the ResLO. He is a Reservist employed to speak to people about all the reserve options. The one that works for me isn't associated to any of the units in my area so has no particular affiliation to any unit,

The person you spoke to may not have much idea about reserves, especially officers, as the NRC make it abundantly clear that the SCA'a should talk to potential officers and don't teach much about officer (Reg or Reserves) on the course. If the office is anything like mine the reservist info only goes to the ResLO initially anyway, and he distributes it to the other office members. In my office I ensure everyone knows the info but can't speak for other offices.

I wouldn't want to make any specific comments, being a regular CA in a careers office, and the regard you seem to hold them in after one visit. It is late and I am not interested in getting into a bun fight over semantics or comments like "not calling them liars but" so will leave it there.
 
Thanks Sup Rec, I shall do that.

No bunfight is intended - I understand the chaps in recruitment are professionals, and certainly did not intend to imply otherwise, but the army is obviously a large organisation so someone closer to my particular situation could probably shed more light on the realities of the situation - as it sounds this would be the ResLo as you have suggested.

One of the reasons I virtually never post on forums is because it's often difficult to post a question without someone getting upset!
 

Glad_its_all_over

ADC
Book Reviewer
Evening all,

Apologies if this subject has been posted in a similar vein before, but google isn't helping a lot.

I'm considering signing up as a reservist officer. I am quite keen for overseas deployment, but it will be difficult to do both the commissioning/training then deployment within a one year period, as I am self employed.

I'm just wondering what the typical timescale for overseas deployment is post-comissioning? I can probably sacrifice around 3 months in the first year, however as I understand it most deployments tend to be 6-12 months.

On some literature I've found it seems to imply that the first overseas tour won't be for 3 years - is this always the case? Would it vary by unit? One particular unit I was interested in was the intel corps. -however I am also aware there are no guarantees for passing selection for a particular unit.

I appreciate this is something that a recruiter could probably answer, but I'm also acutely aware that sometimes I might not always get the straight skinny on what's really happening, especially with reservists playing a greater role under 2020.

Lastly, I understand currently the situation is volunteers are taken before compulsory mobilisation - (before anyone tunes me in I do intend to volunteer -but a potential 15 months straight commitment, given basic/comissioning and pre deployment beforehand - would financially ruin me, hence me wanting to commission one year and volunteer the next!) - are compulsory mobilisations taking place yet? Do they take place ad hoc, or when deployed reserve numbers across the board are too low?

Thanks in advance for your input.
I think by the time you become one of Her Majesty's trusted and well-beloved friends, a foreign deployment on operations will be a distant memory - if you enjoy digging in the rain in England, you'll be fine.
 

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