Reserve AOSB Standards

#1
I failed to pass main while attempting to go as a regular. I want to go back, but as I've taken some time out and got a job, joining the regulars wouldn't be as easy as it would have been if coming straight out of Uni. I want to get a bit more experience and a few more qualifications at my job, so I was thinking of going as a reserve officer then going regular. I'm currently in training as a reserve soldier, so I have a unit to go to, but I don't know if Main Board is different for a reservist. Are the standards the same? Are the events all the same? Is it as hard etc. No concrete evidence is about as far as I can see so if anyone knows then please let me know
 
#2
I failed to pass main while attempting to go as a regular. I want to go back, but as I've taken some time out and got a job, joining the regulars wouldn't be as easy as it would have been if coming straight out of Uni. I want to get a bit more experience and a few more qualifications at my job, so I was thinking of going as a reserve officer then going regular. I'm currently in training as a reserve soldier, so I have a unit to go to, but I don't know if Main Board is different for a reservist. Are the standards the same? Are the events all the same? Is it as hard etc. No concrete evidence is about as far as I can see so if anyone knows then please let me know
Its the same and same standard. Someone in my unit initially intended to go reserve officer but after passing decided to go regular and his main board pass still counted.
 
#3
I failed to pass main while attempting to go as a regular. I want to go back, but as I've taken some time out and got a job, joining the regulars wouldn't be as easy as it would have been if coming straight out of Uni. I want to get a bit more experience and a few more qualifications at my job, so I was thinking of going as a reserve officer then going regular. I'm currently in training as a reserve soldier, so I have a unit to go to, but I don't know if Main Board is different for a reservist. Are the standards the same? Are the events all the same? Is it as hard etc. No concrete evidence is about as far as I can see so if anyone knows then please let me know
What's your end goal? If it's to eventually join the army, then join the army. Quals and experience in civvie street won't help you that much and all you're doing is making it harder for yourself by going through sandhurst that little bit older.
Reserve officer selection is the same standard, so it's not an easy pass. And you'll stil have to do the full commissioning course anyway.
 
#4
What's your end goal? If it's to eventually join the army, then join the army. Quals and experience in civvie street won't help you that much and all you're doing is making it harder for yourself by going through sandhurst that little bit older.
Reserve officer selection is the same standard, so it's not an easy pass. And you'll stil have to do the full commissioning course anyway.
My end goal is the army, but it won't be forever. I hope to get to around the rank of Major, but then move on, so having civilian qualifications will help when I come to leave. That and my boss has taken me on, trained me and put a lot of money into me, so I don't want to jump ship without at least breaking even with the cost I created.
 
#5
I can't speak for being in the military but I do spend *a lot* of time counselling military officers (well, Army mostly) on preparation for leaving and where to position themselves for careers after reaching anywhere in the SO3 to SO1 range. I'm focused largely on professional, mid to mid-senior level management then in financial services and then in technology/security.

The most significant factors are:

1) who you are, sounds obvious but most employers don't care what cap badge you were but what sort of person you are as shaped by your previous experience.

2) what you did, again less about your operational experience (which can be viewed rightly or wrongly over and over as more of the same) but the different roles you had as you progressed from hands on operational leadership and management on to ops, int, coordination, cross organisational stuff, programme and project work, attachments, loan service and so on. A lot of guys really miss out on tailoring all this 'other stuff' to the roles they apply for realising that this is much more relatable for civi employers than what the army considers core business. "I led a tank troop and all that entails, oh and by the way I overhauled the way we work with various elements of air support and planning coordination with the RN.", "interesting tell me about the second one, because we do alot of that here".

3) something niche, specialist and/or technical which you have hugely unique can't get anywhere else experience for. We get alot of this in cyber security.

There is a bit of a disconnect between what people in the org thinks sells outside the org and what actually sells and I speak from experience of interviewing literally thousands of people and hiring probably a hundred or so over the years.

I have to run but I'll finish this off later
 
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#6
To summarize, think carefully about what it is that you want to do. This is by far and away the most important question. This ultimately wants to determine what you should do with your career planning and focus on keeping doors open and not closing them and accept it might change.

Think about a job in the Army that you'd actually like to do but which provides for the variability which will sell outside of the Army when you've done your bit. Others can advise you on that. Also, don't put too much stock on people moaning about your commitment. You're already thinking about getting out, blah blah blah. The army got it's head around it not being a job for life with short service commissions, so if the shoe were on the other foot one could complain about it from the other end. Usually the complainers are also moaning about proper career management and the only person who's going to do that for you is you, but presumably only if you're going to commit to 22 or 30+? Pull the other one, it's got bells on. You're just going in with your eyes open.

Keep in touch with the outside world, you'll gain a better perspective on when the right time might be to change tack or in fact not. You will get to a point in your career where when good opportunities arise and you may have to take them the corollary to which is you might spend years looking for a 'good job' and never find it, timing is woefully underestimated when it comes to career planning and growth. Your ears and eyes should be open 24x7, both for new opportunities within the org or without. That doesn't mean you're not giving your all to your current role, it is possible to do both, so do it.

Finally, keep an open mind. I had a friend, he was a solder in the TA. He wanted to commission as a regular in the RE. He completed is basic training in the TA and then with a bit of that under his belt went to AOSB and passed, sponsored by the RE. Ten years later after an op tour as a platoon commander in Afghanistan having changed tack at the factory from combat service support to infantry. As it turns out a year as a tom in the TA gave him a real leg up compared to his peers, he made a good fist of his time at Sandhurst. Point is your goals may always change as stated earlier.

Good luck!
 
#7
So you only really want to be in the Army for say 8-15 years then?
Waste all that training, and never command a battalion, are you not good enough?

Or do you feel that being Major McTwerp it will do you good in the City with Rodders & Charlie in trading.
Either make a career out of it why do 4/5 of the training only to leave?

Full time regular or if you only want to do it for fun reserve officer.
When you come out after 8-15 years what do you expect about a job?
I think the rose tinted sunglasses you wear need cleaning!
Were you reading my post before I posted it? Spooky.

To the OP, this proves my point.
 
#8
So you only really want to be in the Army for say 8-15 years then?
Waste all that training, and never command a battalion, are you not good enough?

Or do you feel that being Major McTwerp it will do you good in the City with Rodders & Charlie in trading.
Either make a career out of it why do 4/5 of the training only to leave?

Full time regular or if you only want to do it for fun reserve officer.
When you come out after 8-15 years what do you expect about a job?
I think the rose tinted sunglasses you wear need cleaning!
People get injured, or start families etc, and move on. The idea that you can't prepare for the future is why people come out of one job, or encounter a problem, and never progress. I want to get to Major because by that point I will have served the country, and commanded soldiers hopefully to the degree where I can know that I did right by them and made their lives better. I don't live in the city, I work for a small firm in the lake district. 8-15 years works for me because I have different things I want to achieve in life. My commitment however is not questionable. I failed main board, if I wasn't determined to be an officer I would have jacked it in then, instead I became a reservist and I am preparing to go again. Also read the quotes at the bottom of your name, You're complaining about a lack of education and making mistakes in your youth. My guess is that your comment comes from the fact that you failed to do what I am doing now which is being prepared and thinking ahead so you feel the need to have a pop at anyone who does. So unless you have anything productive to say then keep it to yourself.
 

cpunk

LE
Moderator
#9
In answer to your initial question, regulars and reservists attend the same board and are assessed to the same standards. The difference is in the training received after the Main Board pass.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
#10
People get injured, or start families etc, and move on. The idea that you can't prepare for the future is why people come out of one job, or encounter a problem, and never progress. I want to get to Major because by that point I will have served the country, and commanded soldiers hopefully to the degree where I can know that I did right by them and made their lives better. I don't live in the city, I work for a small firm in the lake district. 8-15 years works for me because I have different things I want to achieve in life. My commitment however is not questionable. I failed main board, if I wasn't determined to be an officer I would have jacked it in then, instead I became a reservist and I am preparing to go again. Also read the quotes at the bottom of your name, You're complaining about a lack of education and making mistakes in your youth. My guess is that your comment comes from the fact that you failed to do what I am doing now which is being prepared and thinking ahead so you feel the need to have a pop at anyone who does. So unless you have anything productive to say then keep it to yourself.
Reading this suggests that you may be lining yourself up for another fail on attitude grounds.

There's being prepared and thinking ahead and then there's being really odd and writing things like 'I want to get to Major because by that point I will have served the country, and commanded soldiers hopefully to the degree where I can know that I did right by them and make their lives better.' That, together with your stridency about 8 -15 years, rather suggests that you don't really understand the nature of the organisation that you want to join. The idea that leadership starts at field rank, which is what you've suggested here even if you didn't realise it, is frankly bizarre.

AOSB wants to know if, with a bit of training, you can be trusted with a platoon/troop. If I were you, I would focus on convincing them that the answer's 'yes' rather than dwelling on your plans for world domination/completing your bucket list.
 
#11
What I would also add, 'getting to about Major' is no mean feat. I know many really good guys who's careers topped out at Captain for their own reasons or others. OC of a Platoon/Squadron is a big deal and if you're looking at the Army as a component part of a bigger career then be realistic about how this may pan out for you.
 
#14
Reading this suggests that you may be lining yourself up for another fail on attitude grounds.

There's being prepared and thinking ahead and then there's being really odd and writing things like 'I want to get to Major because by that point I will have served the country, and commanded soldiers hopefully to the degree where I can know that I did right by them and make their lives better.' That, together with your stridency about 8 -15 years, rather suggests that you don't really understand the nature of the organisation that you want to join. The idea that leadership starts at field rank, which is what you've suggested here even if you didn't realise it, is frankly bizarre.

AOSB wants to know if, with a bit of training, you can be trusted with a platoon/troop. If I were you, I would focus on convincing them that the answer's 'yes' rather than dwelling on your plans for world domination/completing your bucket list.
No, the guy had an attitude with me for no reason, so I responded firmly but fairly. And think what you will, but the ability to actually make an impact on the lives of the people I'd be in charge of has been the thing that's driven me for quite a while. And you've misread me anyway, I'm not saying that at major I will be able to achieve these goals, I know that by the time I have hit that rank and move into greater levels of company command and strategy, I will have had the opportunity to lead at a platoon level where I'd be in the position to best achieve what I want out of the army.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
#15
No, the guy had an attitude with me for no reason, so I responded firmly but fairly. And think what you will, but the ability to actually make an impact on the lives of the people I'd be in charge of has been the thing that's driven me for quite a while. And you've misread me anyway, I'm not saying that at major I will be able to achieve these goals, I know that by the time I have hit that rank and move into greater levels of company command and strategy, I will have had the opportunity to lead at a platoon level where I'd be in the position to best achieve what I want out of the army.
Please yourself. Some people take advice and some people fail.
 

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