Repurpose old PC

The problem with old machines is that the RAM for them is often no longer made and becomes rarer and more expensive.
Yes. This I learned this year.
I had my 11 years old 64bit PC "upgraded" in the summer to an SSD, better Graphics card and a new power box.
However, the extra 4 gig chip was blagged out one of my guy's black boxes of Antiques Roadshow spares!
I do not know if it helps. but I don't think it'll be worse off. Only cost a 10-er anyhow.
Ended up with pretty much a new PC for about £140.00 including a fresh OS.
Certainly the SSD seems to promote better performance from the old original clattery HD...full boot up time is on average 1m 26 seconds.
 
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The difference between running the OS off an SSD vs a mechanical disk is night and day. I’d perhaps start there, though I would consider just selling it, because the hardware is verging on obsolete. There comes a point where it’s not worth investing in something anymore. I don’t think that spec is quite there yet, but it’s close. For example, I’m typing this on an iPad, that has benchmarks of 5x-9x the Celeron Q9300/GTS-250 combo. That’s just an iPad.

So, while not wanting to be Debbie Downer, I’d think about where that machine will be in 3 years’ time vs a modern one, and whether that was acceptable. If so, then I’d start with an SSD, even a used one off eBay for pocket change.
 
Was that for me?
Only OEM bit left is the motherboard. It's all going extremely well and stable...for pretty much loose change.
I bought a nice (used) Samsung 27" HD monitor/TV as well for £50.00 so the whole package feels and goes like a grand plus worth!:D Probably good for many more years.
Not as good as a Billy Bargain Jaaaaaaggggg...but hey ho!
 
Was that for me?
Only OEM bit left is the motherboard. It's all going extremely well and stable...for pretty much loose change.
I bought a nice (used) Samsung HD monitor/TV as well for £50.00 so the whole package feels and goes like a grand plus worth!:D
Not as good as a Billy Bargain Jaaaaaaggggg...but hey ho!

No, the OP.

I’ve set myself a 7-year limit; something I’ve learned over the last year with 3 old machines in our family. Not worth investing in those old machines after 7 years. Won’t run the latest OS, so can’t use feature “x”. I’ve got a stack of 4x laptops on my bench that I just need to reformat and sell.
 
No, the OP.

I’ve set myself a 7-year limit; something I’ve learned over the last year with 3 old machines in our family. Not worth investing in those old machines after 7 years. Won’t run the latest OS, so can’t use feature “x”. I’ve got a stack of 4x laptops on my bench that I just need to reformat and sell.
I'm a Jock though.
Hoots Mon man.
Tighter than a tight thing clenched in the bony fist of a old girning Scot tightwad on payday.
 
+1 on the used SSD. I have an old Samsung N102SP netbook that I use for OBD. It clanked and clicked with the rotating HDD and was brick slow at everything. One £10 SSD from eBay and a 2GB DIMM (free) later, it runs like a champ. Cold boot duration (Win 7 Pro x86) is about 30 seconds. Not bad for an Intel Atom CPU.

I used it to trigger a DPF regen for a colleague whose C-MAX had failed the MoT on emissions.
 
Your CPU can handle 64bit. As for doing a re-set, that's a personal thing, you will still lose all your none backed up data and files.

My preference has always been to do a full back-up to a removable disk, then do a full install, you do not need to create a partition and format, as you would have done with win 95 etc. The installer will do all that for you.

Having installed a fresh OS, just restore your files and data from the removable back that you created.

With the ability to add lots more ram and having a SSD hard drive will make your PC unrecognizable,

This laptop i'm using is an old Dell Latitude. I swapped out the original HDD and put in an SSD. I imaged the original drive and transferred it to the new drive. I now have 12 gig of ram, up from 4.
I have another PC that I built - SSDs etc... just crap with the OS/software side of stuff so want to make sure I have the cleanest possible machine using the most reliable method.

Already taken the files off I need - everything else can go.
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
+1 on the used SSD. I have an old Samsung N102SP netbook that I use for OBD. It clanked and clicked with the rotating HDD and was brick slow at everything. One £10 SSD from eBay and a 2GB DIMM (free) later, it runs like a champ. Cold boot duration (Win 7 Pro x86) is about 30 seconds. Not bad for an Intel Atom CPU.

I used it to trigger a DPF regen for a colleague whose C-MAX had failed the MoT on emissions.


I got an SSD from CEX for Mini phantoms school computer (which was cobbled together out of several older laptops I had , extra RAM and the best processor that I had which would fit and it was pretty good
 
I got an SSD from CEX for Mini phantoms school computer (which was cobbled together out of several older laptops I had , extra RAM and the best processor that I had which would fit and it was pretty good

I find CEX prices to be all over the place: phones and tablets are far too expensive, yet PC parts are usually underpriced.
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
I find CEX prices to be all over the place: phones and tablets are far too expensive, yet PC parts are usually underpriced.

Their camera stuff has two price options, way OTT or a bargain. Never reasonably priced for them and the customer at the same time.
 
The problem with old machines is that the RAM for them is often no longer made and becomes rarer and more expensive.

I thought that, and was going to offload some old ram sticks I found, but looking at ebay there is usually someone selling them cheap

Go for the ex corporate second hand pc sellers, and yes parts will be expensive
 
Now, going a bit further down the line.

I intend to add to the two standard HDDs (SATA connections withstanding - so might have to take one of the two HDDs out) with a small SSD for boot and then a large external SSD - external because it's purely going to be for audio workstation stuff and I'd like to be able to transport that and plug into other DAWs in other studios.

Question - is it worth doing the reformat/reset of the main HDD or just take it out, stick in the boot SSD and then boot from the Win10USB?

Sorry for the dumb Qs.
 

MrBane

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Go for the Peppermint distro. Piss easy to do and has a GUI. I had a spree during lockdown of getting old PCs for pennies, putting PM onto them with Open Office onto them then gifting them to groups trying to support people during lockdown or to parents who didn't have the tech to do home schooling.

Please note, and this is important.

It's Linux.

But even I could do it.
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
are SSDs just drop in replacements for HDDs?

I cloned my old laptop drive onto the SSD, took out the old one, popped in the new, hey presto, faster computer
 
Go for the Peppermint distro. Piss easy to do and has a GUI. I had a spree during lockdown of getting old PCs for pennies, putting PM onto them with Open Office onto them then gifting them to groups trying to support people during lockdown or to parents who didn't have the tech to do home schooling.

Please note, and this is important.

It's Linux.

But even I could do it.
Thanks for the suggestion, and I have looked at it - but it seems that the process for working with DAWs is that it need to be fully stable and you can be using loads (hundreds) of third party Plug-Ins, which also need to be super stable - and that can't be guaranteed with Linux, so it seems to be a bit of a non-starter.
 
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