Army Rumour Service

Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Republic of Ireland.......friend or foe?

Chalkythedog

War Hero
It's a question I've been struggling with for a while.

More accurately, I'm struggling to think of a single example of where the RoI has acted as a decent neighbour. Perhaps I'm missing something. It's pretty easy to identify acts of neighbourliness by the UK Gov't towards the RoI, a recent example being the UK lending RoI £80bn during the financial crisis far quicker, and on more generous terms, than the ECB, in order that the place not fall over.

The acts of hostility from the RoI towards the UK are legion, but can somebody help me out with examples of the opposite?
Foe
 
Interested in hearing people's views on the thread subject matter now a couple of years have passed, and Irish Government have made such a fine job of being the UK's friend.
 
Interested in hearing people's views on the thread subject matter now a couple of years have passed, and Irish Government have made such a fine job of being the UK's friend.

Your ex pat Australian rage is beyond compare, 9+

I don't expect your anger towards everything Irish to diminish, but after a few years you should rebrand your anti Irish anger under a new banner.

Its probably a good idea to omit your mother being from Dublin and focus on something current. Focus on the Irish government handling the Covid crisis

If you're a true life anti Irish ,chap in Australia then stop telling us how angry you are, take your anger to the nearest bar and ask every man and woman who dislikes ex London City bankers for a fist fight and make sure they know your Mum is from Dublin.
 
Last edited:
Your ex pat Australian rage is beyond compare, 9+

I don't expect your anger towards everything Irish to diminish, but after a few years you should rebrand your anti Irish anger under a new banner.

Its probably a good idea to omit your mother being from Dublin and focus on something current. Focus on the Irish government handling the Covid crisis

If you're a true life anti Irish ,chap in Australia then stop telling us how angry you are, take your anger to the nearest bar and ask every man and woman who dislikes ex London City bankers for a fist fight and make sure they know your Mum is from Dublin.

Mother is dead now, all bets are off!

Still have property and a business in London, so still paying tax.

Few of anything where I live, let alone Irish.

What’s this COVID of which you speak?
 
Despite the ( current)Teashops fervent wish for us to forget their behaviour in the period since our referendum, I’m by no means sure he will get his wish.
The big boys money talked in December when Brussels blinked,And the apparatchiks in the comission are no doubt still seething and plotting revenge in small petty inconveniences and no doubt bigger ones if the opportunity arises.
Eires govts problem is still one of geography ( the wrong side of the U.K.) and the squandering of good will over here.
Every inconvenience the EU puts in Britain’s path inconveniences Eire as well, The more awkward the Eu becomes , the more incentive there is for the U.K. to trade outside their market.which includes the bogtrotters!.
I have said this before but Eires large market in dairy and beef here was gifted to them by tariff walls going up when we joined the EEC.It was not a god given right to market share and other countrys will want a bite of that trade back ( not least Australia in the midst of its trade war with China).
We should pointedly favour trading relationships with commonwealth countrys first. ( Eire pointedly refused to join the commonwealth)
so in conclusion , on trade , we should trade with them if they can compete on price, but no favours , and if the EU plays silly buggers with us again , no effort to shield Eire from the collateral damage. They are not friends , they are users, and whilst we can hold our nose and do Buisness I hope our politicians take heed how (yet again ) Eire behaved when it thought it could get away with it.
imho of course.
 
Last edited:
Despite the ( current)Teashops fervent wish for us to forget their behaviour in the period since our referendum, I’m by no means sure he will get his wish.
The big boys money talked in December when Brussels blinked,And the apparatchiks in the comission are no doubt still seething and plotting revenge in small petty inconveniences and no doubt bigger ones if the opportunity arises.
Eires govts problem is still one of geography ( the wrong side of the U.K.) and the squandering of good will over here.
Every inconvenience the EU puts in Britain’s path inconveniences Eire as well, The more awkward the Eu becomes , the more incentive there is for the U.K. to trade outside their market.which includes the bogtrotters!.
I have said this before but Eires large market in dairy and beef here was gifted to them by tariff walls going up when we joined the EEC.It was not a god given right to market share and other countrys will want a bite of that trade ( not least Australia in the midst of its trade war with China).
We should pointedly favour trading relationships with commonwealth countrys first. ( Eire pointedly refused to join the commonwealth)
so in conclusion , on trade , we should trade with them if they can compete on price, but no favours , and if the EU plays silly buggers with us again , no effort to shield Eire from the collateral damage. They are not friends , they are users, and whilst we can hold our nose and do Buisness I hope our politicians take heed how (yet again ) Eire behaved when it thought it could get away with it.
imho of course.
Our trade in meat and dairy was well established, long before the EEC. Two World wars saw to that. As for the commonwealth, it offered us nothing except scraps from the table and prices for goods were skewed in favour of the big commonwealth players so it was a no brainer to leave. Ireland was dirt poor and couldn't sustain its own population and economy on British terms so it looked West to the USA and East to Europe simply because it had to. The consequences of ww2 nearly broke us and we really didn't start to regain our strength until the 1960s. EEC membership was a godsend at the time but its a poisoned chalice these days.
 
Yes the trade was established ( how could it not from when Eire was part of the U.K.).
Dev still nearly screwed that up with his 1936 reneging of agri mortgages deal and subsequent trade war. Hitlers shenanigans was his savour for trade.
The EEC effectively gave Eire the market acess that had been enjoyed by Brazil, paraquay, , Australia and NZ. no problem with Eire seizing an opportunity, god only knows they needed it. Its not a god given right though.
But don’t make me laugh on not joining the commonwealth, you will be telling me next Eire covertly assisted in the anti u boat campaign willingly.
no offence!.
 
Last edited:

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Well, they better starting thinking about who'd they'd rather have on side. Us or the eu, if they go with the eu then it's a f*cking long ferry ride around us to get to France!
Now just how prescient was that post in 2017?
 

Johned

Old-Salt
Eire was nominally in the Commonwealth, I believe until 1949. During the war, when Churchill tried to reason with Dev over use of the "Treaty" ports, the former reminded the latter that Irish food was transported in British ships which were being subject to the devastating U-boat campaign.
 
Treaty ports indeed. Wiki the 1930’s trade war, particularily who started it, and eventually baldwins ceding the treaty ports not long before the War.
I wonder how many merchantmen lives that little mistake cost.
( I first had that thought whilst looking at the very long list of ships and men’s names on the memorial on Liverpool quayside.).
still independence and sticking it to the English counts for all.
 

Johned

Old-Salt
They earned good money in this country during the war though and good luck to them. I earnestly recall my old widowed Granny in Uppingham, Rutland whose sons were all abroad in the forces. She had a gaggle of Irishmen billeted on her. I well remember as a lad biking there from our home in Stamford one Saturday and seeing this chap sprawled out on her front room sofa "Gie us a cuppa char, Mar!" he plaintively called. I felt like saying "get it yourself, ya lazy git!" Similarly our next door neighbour. She had a Gangmaster billeted on her and I used to be most interested in the mid thirties Hudson Terraplane saloon to transport his fellow countrymen, most impressive in those days. They worked on the local RAF aerodromes.
 
Those merchant ships were manned by a great deal of Irishmen, my grand uncle among them and he was the only survivor of his ship and served throughout the war. 16 of our Irish registered ships (about a quarter of our total fleet) were lost to enemy action, despite being neutral and brightly lit and flagged, so we paid in blood for those men and ships. On that front alone, the Irish owe you nothing........ Churchill was also noted for his willingness to pout and throw a strop when he didn't get his way, on Irish matters, which included withholding vital weapons and spare parts which had already been paid for. It was always cash on the nail for those arms and there was no Lend -Lease for us. When he pressured DeValera to allow crashed RAF aircrew to cross the Border, he had to be reminded that we were owed the aforementioned parts and weapons and that aircrew were routinely assisted to cross the Border anyway,especially if they had landed in Ireland by accident, as was quite common. So it ended up being a trade; you got your lads back and we got parts. All along, relations between the Irish and British militaries were always courteous and professional. Dev was no saint either and was also known to be bloody-minded too and both sets of militaries often spent time undoing the damage caused by their political masters.
 
Despite the ( current)Teashops fervent wish for us to forget their behaviour in the period since our referendum, I’m by no means sure he will get his wish.
The big boys money talked in December when Brussels blinked,And the apparatchiks in the comission are no doubt still seething and plotting revenge in small petty inconveniences and no doubt bigger ones if the opportunity arises.
Eires govts problem is still one of geography ( the wrong side of the U.K.) and the squandering of good will over here.
Every inconvenience the EU puts in Britain’s path inconveniences Eire as well, The more awkward the Eu becomes , the more incentive there is for the U.K. to trade outside their market.which includes the bogtrotters!.
I have said this before but Eires large market in dairy and beef here was gifted to them by tariff walls going up when we joined the EEC.It was not a god given right to market share and other countrys will want a bite of that trade back ( not least Australia in the midst of its trade war with China).
We should pointedly favour trading relationships with commonwealth countrys first. ( Eire pointedly refused to join the commonwealth)
so in conclusion , on trade , we should trade with them if they can compete on price, but no favours , and if the EU plays silly buggers with us again , no effort to shield Eire from the collateral damage. They are not friends , they are users, and whilst we can hold our nose and do Buisness I hope our politicians take heed how (yet again ) Eire behaved when it thought it could get away with it.
imho of course.
I'm suspicious of your knowledge of Ireland (you can call it that BTW) since you can't seem to spell it in the language you keep using.
 

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
Dummy.
Its fecking 'Oirland' as any fule no.

The map on the wall of my Office still states that of the British Isles it is still the Irish Free State.

map.jpg


But it is a nice map - it's just that it's dated now.
 

Latest Threads

Top