Repossession of adjoining property - can I find out if it's really happened?

NSP

LE
Does anyone know how to find out (without the subject being able to find out, ideally) if a property has been repossessed or not? The flat below the front half of mine is/was owned by a buy-to-let who is a right thorn in everyone's side, resident's management company-wise, and their tenant has told me that they were informed by a letting agent that the flat was repossessed three weeks ago and they are now to pay their rent to that letting agent on behalf of the lender. The tenant did some ringing around in case they were being scammed and apparently it's pukka. However, the Land Registry still shows the arseholes as holding the title, not the mortgage provider.

I'd really like it to be true so that, if the arseholes show up at our AGM in November trying to act like king shit, I can say, "Mr. Chairman. These clowns have not held a lease here since August, have no business with the company and no right to attend this meeting. Please insist that they leave immediately." However, I've nothing but the tenants gob to back it up - so far - and the BTLs are a pair of arrogant, lying, chancing James Blunts who would loudly give it, "No, no, no - this is not true," and be believed by the vacant-headed old crocks on the ground floor that seem to be beholden to their every word.

Is there some way I can obtain hard, printable evidence that they are out that would sway the clique...?

Yes - I have Googled the shit out of it, including seeing if their name comes up under "judgements" on the .gov.uk page for courts. No joy, however.
 
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When you’ve calmed down, rewrite that in English, without us having to guess some of the words, then we might be able to help.

Until then you’re alone with your rage.
 
Land Registry updates take 3 to 6 weeks if there are no issues, longer if there are. The new letting agent must have proof that they are now responsible, get the tenants to demand that proof.
 
Mate, three weeks is nothing in the immediate and urgent priorities of the civil service.
Updating records and files will be well down the list for them.
 
Land Registry updates take 3 to 6 weeks if there are no issues, longer if there are. The new letting agent must have proof that they are now responsible, get the tenants to demand that proof.

You can do a quick search for £3 of the Land Registry. This will show property ownership.
 

FrosteeMARIA

LE
Gallery Guru
Does anyone know how to find out (without the subject being able to find out, ideally) if a property has been repossessed or not? The flat below the front half of mine is/was owned by a buy-to-let who is a right thorn in everyone's side, resident's management company-wise, and their tenant has told me that they were informed by a letting agent that the flat was repossessed three weeks ago and they are now to pay their rent to that letting agent on behalf of the lender. The tenant did some ringing around in case they were being scammed and apparently it's pukka. However, the Land Registry still shows the ********* as holding the title, not the mortgage provider.

I'd really like it to be true so that, if the ********* show up at our AGM in November trying to act like king shit, I can say, "Mr. Chairman. These clowns have not held a lease here since August, have no business with the company and no right to attend this meeting. Please insist that they leave immediately." However, I've nothing but the tenants gob to back it up - so far - and the BTLs are a pair of arrogant, lying, chancing James Blunts who would loudly give it, "No, no, no - this is not true," and be believed by the vacant-headed old crocks on the ground floor that seem to be beholden to their every word.

Is there some way I can obtain hard, printable evidence that they are out that would sway the clique...?

Yes - I have Googled the shit out of it, including seeing if their name comes up under "judgements" on the .gov.uk page for courts. No joy, however.
I can look up CCJs if you PM the details :)
 
Contact the lender as an interested party looking to buy the flat
 

Tyk

LE
Land Registry updates take 3 to 6 weeks if there are no issues, longer if there are. The new letting agent must have proof that they are now responsible, get the tenants to demand that proof.

Indeed the letting agent will have to provide written evidence, that said they'd only have to provide it to people with a direct interest in the contract, namely the owner (whoever that is) and the tenants.
If the tenants will provide a copy of the proof then you'll have what you need @NSP .
 

NSP

LE
Land Registry updates take 3 to 6 weeks if there are no issues, longer if there are. The new letting agent must have proof that they are now responsible, get the tenants to demand that proof.
She's had a letter...
 

NSP

LE
Contact the lender as an interested party looking to buy the flat
It's not on the market. yet. Seems that a letting agent has been appointed, claiming to collect the rent on behalf of the lender and instructing that no monies be paid to the (previous) owners. If they've really lost the flat then praise be!!

Letting agent is not local and wrote, then 'phoned. Told tenant that the [former] owners hadn't been paying their mortgage (sounds well in form for them) and the flat had been repossessed and that the tenant was to treat them as the landlord for the time being. Suspect that when the tenancy determines in first week of January then they will hoof the tenant and the lender will seek to sell with vacant possession. Tenant can't leave before end of tenancy, which sounds legally dubious - new landlord must assume the original terms or issue new ones; either way, the tenant must have the same right to determine as the landlord, as best I remember it from my long-since past renting days.

Personally I couldn't give a thru'penny bit either way for the tenant; I just want to know that I am on safe ground ripping the current directors of our RMC a new one for not playing straight with the members of the company or Companies House (the legal bit) at our AGM in November, To do that I need to know for sure the status of the the (hopefully) ex-owner of the flat below.
 
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Require that the chairman of the owner's committee meeting be satisfied, with supporting evidence, of the bona fides of any party attending that meeting. Put the burden on the chairman, as he/she has clear legal obligations relating to the same.
 
You can do a quick search for £3 of the Land Registry. This will show property ownership.

Provided Land Registry has been informed of the changes.

When I serve Party Wall notices on neighbours I quite often have to check LR. On one occasion, after posting to the address of the landlord on LR with no responses, went ahead and drew up awards based on that address. When at the property to compile the Schedule of Condition, who should turn up but the landlord who said he never even knew he had been served notices. (He arrived to do repairs before the next let). We showed him the address we had and he said he hadn’t lived there for years. Nice chap, pleasure to deal with so no dramas, but realised he should have checked that the LR had been updated when he moved.
 
Personally I couldn't give a thru'penny bit either way for the tenant; I just want to know that I am on safe ground ripping the current directors of our RMC a new one

How wonderfully humanitarian of you.
 

Aphra

Old-Salt
Have you searched the Register of Judgments under the landlord's personal name as well as any and all company names used? It's not uncommon for several names to be used across various business entities. There's a fee for each search, iirc it's up to a tenner.

HM Land Registry are currently swamped with people trying to beat Stamp Duty dates, and a lot of staff are working from home, so delays are inevitable.

If I were the tenant, I'd want more than a letter from some random letting agents. This is actually a well-known scam where dodgy people set up as LA's and get rents paid to them for a few months until the genuine landlord/agent takes action against the tenant for non-payment, whereupon the dodgy people disappear with the cash. I'd want sight of the actual judgment before I'd part with a penny. Mortgage lenders have their own property departments who deal with repossessed properties and don't generally outsource it to letting agents.
 

NSP

LE
This pair of chancers have a couple of CCJs against them from 2019, totalling just shy of fifteen grand. They were also subject to an IVA in 2013 and had their business put into administration and then liquidated in 2014. Their business acumen seem to be less than plentiful!
 

Aphra

Old-Salt
This pair of chancers have a couple of CCJs against them from 2019, totalling just shy of fifteen grand. They were also subject to an IVA in 2013 and had their business put into administration and then liquidated in 2014. Their business acumen seem to be less than plentiful!
Hmmm, all the more reason for the tenants to be extra cautious. I suppose it's possible that the landlord is not above scamming their own tenants in the manner outlined above, in a bid to avoid creditors.

As a former debt adviser I'm duty bound to say that CCJ's, IVA's etc don't necessarily mean someone is dishonest as cash flow problems can affect anyone. However, they can be, as our military brethren here might say, combat indicators.
 

FrosteeMARIA

LE
Gallery Guru
From what I've seen from the company reports I wouldn't touch them with someone elses barge pole.
Multiple dissolved companies, with a fair few CCJs to boot.
 

Aphra

Old-Salt
From what I've seen from the company reports I wouldn't touch them with someone elses barge pole.
Multiple dissolved companies, with a fair few CCJs to boot.
Ah, I did wonder whether they were what we called frequent flyers at the County Court. If you've found no indication of repossession among all that I'd still be betting on them attempting to have rents paid to another, ostensibly separate, entity to avoid creditors seeing genuine income.

Clearly @NSP has his own reasons for wanting to see the back of the current tenants as well as the landlord so it may be that an approach to the Mortgagor as suggested by @single malt earlier would be worth a try if he doesn't want to get further involved with the tenant.
 

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