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Reports of massacre of protesters in Lagos

Amid all the ongoing demonstrations around the world, some low-key, some not so much, from Belarus to Thailand with Bulgaria in between (no, I haven't heard much about Bulgaria but something seems to be cooking), which combined with CV-19 all portend toward a fractious year for the world in the year ahead. A curious protest has been ongoing in Africa's largest economy Nigeria.

It seems to be mainly focused on the alleged abuses of a branch of the security forces with the unfortunate name of the SARS, so that demonstrators seem to be calling for strict health measures demanding an end to SARS.

Anyhoo it has been boiling over nicely for the past few months, and this morning reports are breaking of a massacre of protesters by the army in an upmarket suburb of Lagos.

Would anyone with an insight into the politics and society of Nigeria like to fill in those of us less well-educated on the situation?

I could read the BBC but I always distrust the unconscious bias that western reporters put on news from Africa and Asia, as they invariably report the situation in black-and-white, good guys versus bad guys, terms. I prefer to get my reports unfiltered from people who know a bit about the back alleys, project sites, food stalls and wh0res of a country, they tend to have a better idea about what's going on than well-intentioned, white journos who never venture outside the air-conditioned hotels and ministerial offices.

 
They made it onto Plank of the Week last week. The relevant section is 37 minutes in and they sound scary. Unlike our terribly racist police here, if you try to film SARS arresting you in Nigeria, they shoot you.

 
They made it onto Plank of the Week last week. The relevant section is 37 minutes in and they sound scary. Unlike our terribly racist police here, if you try to film SARS arresting you in Nigeria, they shoot you.

Thanks for that link, I am afraid I wasn't paying as much attention as I perhaps I might have been to the lovely Esther's explanation, distracted as I was by that fine cleavage, I may have to listen again on audio only.
 
So that's Thailand, Nigeria and Rhodesia that you have no knowledge of.

It might be quicker for you to write a short list of things that you do know about
 
But I thought “#BLM”?
Why isn’t the murder of 20 black protesters not getting the full media treatment? :roll:
 
Lagos is always on a knife edge.
It takes very little for major violence to kick off.
(During the 98 World Cup, there were powercuts during one of Nigeria's games.
Mobs went to the local power authority, and torched the building.)
Oh, and 'Lekki' is 'upmarket' inasmuch as the potholes are filled in annually.
 
Because it was blacks killing blacks. No nasty racist white people involved, therefore no news.
You clearly missed my ‘rolled eyes’ (sarcasm) emoji?
 

Cruthin1967

Old-Salt
Lagos is always on a knife edge.
It takes very little for major violence to kick off.
(During the 98 World Cup, there were powercuts during one of Nigeria's games.
Mobs went to the local power authority, and torched the building.)
Oh, and 'Lekki' is 'upmarket' inasmuch as the potholes are filled in annually.
Excellent definition of "upmarket."
 
Excellent definition of "upmarket."


 
They made it onto Plank of the Week last week. The relevant section is 37 minutes in and they sound scary. Unlike our terribly racist police here, if you try to film SARS arresting you in Nigeria, they shoot you.

I'm interested that the mention of MPs pay was made towards the end of the program. Now how long have people been complaining of the MP's awards system. Covid effects have been the driver but the reality is that they have always managed to feather their own nests in bad times, whatever party. I liked the China bit as well.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
Amid all the ongoing demonstrations around the world, some low-key, some not so much, from Belarus to Thailand with Bulgaria in between (no, I haven't heard much about Bulgaria but something seems to be cooking), which combined with CV-19 all portend toward a fractious year for the world in the year ahead. A curious protest has been ongoing in Africa's largest economy Nigeria.

It seems to be mainly focused on the alleged abuses of a branch of the security forces with the unfortunate name of the SARS, so that demonstrators seem to be calling for strict health measures demanding an end to SARS.

Anyhoo it has been boiling over nicely for the past few months, and this morning reports are breaking of a massacre of protesters by the army in an upmarket suburb of Lagos.

Would anyone with an insight into the politics and society of Nigeria like to fill in those of us less well-educated on the situation?

I could read the BBC but I always distrust the unconscious bias that western reporters put on news from Africa and Asia, as they invariably report the situation in black-and-white, good guys versus bad guys, terms. I prefer to get my reports unfiltered from people who know a bit about the back alleys, project sites, food stalls and wh0res of a country, they tend to have a better idea about what's going on than well-intentioned, white journos who never venture outside the air-conditioned hotels and ministerial offices.

The Nigerians have a police force (MOPOL) generally referred to as the 'Kill and Go', which pretty much sums up the general approach to law enforcement of all the various agencies. Mind you, seeing some of the creatures upon which the law has to be enforced, they can be forgiven much. The body count from Nigeria would keep BLM permanently on their hunkers and generally unable to keep up.

As to what's behind the rioting - it could be a genuine crackdown or else it could simply be an elected hood using state resources to put unelected hoods out of business (or another elected hood - the police and elements of the army used to have at it on a semi-regular basis though the navy generally stayed out of it unless someone interfered with their illegal bunkering operations). It's been a while since I worked in Nigeria but, towards the end of my time, there were an increasing number of middle ranking officers in the various military and para-military organisations which abound down there getting increasingly p1ssed off with the corruption and lawlessness and taking active steps to move against it. These active steps were not always well thought through and a random rocket attack on the camp of one of the local characters simply resulted in part of the Delta getting turned upside down for a month or so.

Pretty much everyone is part of a family/tribal network or in some kind of client relationship, which is worth bearing in mind if you're an employer. If the money source is being squeezed for any reason, the big guy puts out the word and the network is expected to rally to the flag, no questions asked. The big guy's power depends almost exclusively on his ability to 'Dash' his supporters so cutting the money supply is essentially a declaration of war. There's also a massive group of individuals ever ready for profitable mischief who have nothing to do, absolutely nothing to lose and are available for pennies. Whatever it is, I doubt the rioters are motivated by a sense of public spiritedness and general fair play and that probably goes for those who police them too.

If you're interested in the mess that is Nigeria, 'This House Has Fallen' is a good read as to how it got to where it is, though it's a bit dated now unless there's a revised edition.
 

Oyibo

LE
The Nigerians have a police force (MOPOL) generally referred to as the 'Kill and Go', which pretty much sums up the general approach to law enforcement of all the various agencies. Mind you, seeing some of the creatures upon which the law has to be enforced, they can be forgiven much. The body count from Nigeria would keep BLM permanently on their hunkers and generally unable to keep up.

As to what's behind the rioting - it could be a genuine crackdown or else it could simply be an elected hood using state resources to put unelected hoods out of business (or another elected hood - the police and elements of the army used to have at it on a semi-regular basis though the navy generally stayed out of it unless someone interfered with their illegal bunkering operations). It's been a while since I worked in Nigeria but, towards the end of my time, there were an increasing number of middle ranking officers in the various military and para-military organisations which abound down there getting increasingly p1ssed off with the corruption and lawlessness and taking active steps to move against it. These active steps were not always well thought through and a random rocket attack on the camp of one of the local characters simply resulted in part of the Delta getting turned upside down for a month or so.

Pretty much everyone is part of a family/tribal network or in some kind of client relationship, which is worth bearing in mind if you're an employer. If the money source is being squeezed for any reason, the big guy puts out the word and the network is expected to rally to the flag, no questions asked. The big guy's power depends almost exclusively on his ability to 'Dash' his supporters so cutting the money supply is essentially a declaration of war. There's also a massive group of individuals ever ready for profitable mischief who have nothing to do, absolutely nothing to lose and are available for pennies. Whatever it is, I doubt the rioters are motivated by a sense of public spiritedness and general fair play and that probably goes for those who police them too.

If you're interested in the mess that is Nigeria, 'This House Has Fallen' is a good read as to how it got to where it is, though it's a bit dated now unless there's a revised edition.

Thoroughly agreed. Especially with your third paragraph.

I don't particularly like Louis Theroux, but his documentary Law and Disorder in Lagos was very good at showing how things work (or don't):

 
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