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Removing TRV

Am trying to replace yea olde TRVs (about 22 years old) with new Hive ones but cannot get the old ones off. Assuming that I turn the knurled bit to the left of the big nut. Tried leftie loosie and righty tightie without success.

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Can I be the first to suggest fire or explosives?
 

Arte_et_Marte

ADC
Moderator
Why aren't the thread gubbins on your new Thermostatic valve? All you do is disconnect from the rad (the big nut in your pic) and remove from the pipe. Job done.

If that inlet pipe is plastic it will need a new pipe fitment inside it before you reassemble. Whole job should take 10 minutes if you have a combi boiler.
 
The amount of green crud around the whole thing suggests a complete replacement, plus as far as I remember, the stud going into the rad is the type with 2 lugs to tighten or remove, which can be a bugger without a special tool.
 
I presume that you've tried mole grips and other highly technical kit?
 
Why aren't the thread gubbins on your new Thermostatic valve? All you do is disconnect from the rad (the big nut in your pic) and remove from the pipe. Job done.

If that inlet pipe is plastic it will need a new pipe fitment inside it before you reassemble. Whole job should take 10 minutes if you have a combi boiler.


Its connected to the radiator., not the boiler, which is in another room-garage-utility room-upstairs cupboard-loft-basement.
I presume that you've tried mole grips and other highly technical kit?
Electricians gland nut pliers or a small pair of stiltsons should do the trick.
 
Why aren't the thread gubbins on your new Thermostatic valve? All you do is disconnect from the rad (the big nut in your pic) and remove from the pipe. Job done.
New TRV comes with thread gubbins but need to screw into the thread where the old TRV was. If I disconnect the big nut the water will pour out of the radiator.
If that inlet pipe is plastic it will need a new pipe fitment inside it before you reassemble. Whole job should take 10 minutes if you have a combi boiler.
Pipes on the whole system are plastic and meet with the Gas Boards standards.
 
The amount of green crud around the whole thing suggests a complete replacement, plus as far as I remember, the stud going into the rad is the type with 2 lugs to tighten or remove, which can be a bugger without a special tool.
Applied some trusty WD40 and got one off, only 5 more to go. First one is still solid.
 

Arte_et_Marte

ADC
Moderator
New TRV comes with thread gubbins but need to screw into the thread where the old TRV was. If I disconnect the big nut the water will pour out of the radiator.
Pipes on the whole system are plastic and meet with the Gas Boards standards.

Sort of correct. I mentioned combi boiler, because that's important. If you have one, turn the heating off and water will not 'pour out' of the rad if your quick it's easy. You will get a little bit, but a small tuppaware will sort that.

Aye, I know the pipe standards, but if you have to cut the plastic pipe, you will have to fit a small adaptor into it before joining it to the TSV (or any other fitting). It acts as a seal and stops the pipe getting crushed.
 
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Arte_et_Marte

ADC
Moderator
Its connected to the radiator., not the boiler, which is in another room-garage-utility room-upstairs cupboard-loft-basement.

Electricians gland nut pliers or a small pair of stiltsons should do the trick.

I can see it's connected to a radiator. If you do not understand the importance of the type of boiler you have in a house, you will get in a (wet) mess. With a combi boiler, there is no mess.
 
Sort of correct. I mentioned combi boiler, because that's important. If you have one, turn the heating off and water will not 'pour out' of the rad. You will get a little bit, but a small tuppaware will sort that.

Aye, I know the pipe standards, but if you have to cut the plastic pipe, you will have to fit a small adaptor into it before joining it to the TSV (or any other fitting). It acts as a seal and stops the pipe getting crushed.


Its a given that before you start on any water system, you shut down the boiler, turn off the water supply, and isolate the boiler to rad feed.
 
I can see it's connected to a radiator. If you do not understand the importance of the type of boiler you have in a house, you will get in a (wet) mess. With a combi boiler, there is no mess.
You're still likely to get the contents of the radiator on your shoes/carpet/dog/SWMBO before you can get anything under it. Closing the valve at the other end of the radiator might help limit the indoor tsunami.
 

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