Removing non-stick coating.

What is says on the tin.
Heavy duty stainless steel frying pan, part of a set, just starting to show a bit of wear.
Nice pan don't want to sling it
Anybody done it or have a clue of the best way.
 

Chef

LE
Wet and dry?
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
I bought a cheap stainless steel non stick wok for camping a few years back. After a few goes on the campfire most of the non stick coating started to peel off.

What was underneath wasn’t very pleasant and not something I wanted to be cooking food on.

It had a sort of permanently dirty grey sheen to it that left black marks on your hands.
 
Have you considered "seasoning" it?
 

Bodenplatte

War Hero
Sanding disc electric drill, finest grade you can get.
Then buff up with scouring powder, and then a metal fine polishing paste.
Remove all traces of (even invisible, otherwise you'll have the taste of the paste for quite a while) with a solvent, then boiling water and washing up liquid.
Then season the surface with cooking oil before using the pan.
 

endure

GCM
I bought a cheap stainless steel non stick wok for camping a few years back. After a few goes on the campfire most of the non stick coating started to peel off.

What was underneath wasn’t very pleasant and not something I wanted to be cooking food on.

It had a sort of permanently dirty grey sheen to it that left black marks on your hands.

Non stick woks are oxymorons especially when proper woks are available at your local Chinese supermarket for a tenner.
 
I will ask the wife

Shes managed it on every ******* pan in the house
The ever young Mrs B&B being of the engineer persuasion I don't think I can point the finger really.
She was talking of sandblasting, when she is allowed back in work, but I think that may be over the stop.
 
Sanding disc electric drill, finest grade you can get.
Then buff up with scouring powder, and then a metal fine polishing paste.
Remove all traces of (even invisible, otherwise you'll have the taste of the paste for quite a while) with a solvent, then boiling water and washing up liquid.
Then season the surface with cooking oil before using the pan.
That does sound the way forward.
 
Sling it and buy an iron skillet. You'll never look back.

Unless you dislocate your shoulder while trying to flip a pancake.
 
A gentleman dressed in purple told me to suggest explosives
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
paint stripper will soften it up if memory serves. I've stripped a few in the past

stainless is not normally sold as non stick though, it's usually alu.
 
Non stick woks are oxymorons especially when proper woks are available at your local Chinese supermarket for a tenner.
My wok is 27 years old (wedding present) carbon steel, always lightly oiled before being put away. It is jet black and nothing sticks. There is a Chinese saying. The blacker the wok, the better the cook.
 

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