Remembrance Sunday for the ex-Serving - Do you go on parade and if so why?

I parade because.....

  • It's the decent thing to do.

    Votes: 33 35.5%
  • To honour the Unknown Warrior.

    Votes: 12 12.9%
  • To honour the family you never met.

    Votes: 13 14.0%
  • To show your mates that they will never be forgotten.

    Votes: 53 57.0%
  • A good tradition to pass on to your children.

    Votes: 19 20.4%
  • It's a chance to polish off your bling and blag a pint.

    Votes: 15 16.1%
  • It's a chance to get bladdered and swing the lantern.

    Votes: 13 14.0%
  • To quietly pay my respects and head of home.

    Votes: 37 39.8%
  • Its a chance to Walt and cause outrage on Arrse.

    Votes: 7 7.5%
  • It's a chance to wear Grandad's Iron Cross!

    Votes: 7 7.5%

  • Total voters
    93
  • Poll closed .
#1
It may well be my imagination but there seems to have been an up turn in the numbers of people attending Remembrance Parades over the past decade or so. When we were in it was a 3 line whip but what makes YOU attend now you're a doddery old git?

You can tick as many of the options as you'd like. I fully expect at least one of you to tick nine out of the ten!
 
#2
RESPECT for our fallen, past and present, wherever they may be.
 
#3
I get a chance to dust off my bling, pay some respects, and have a few beers. I usually go to the cenotaph, and once in a while I'll bump into someone I've not seen for a few years and get on it.
 

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
#10
Stand around with aged parent. Get cold, wet, look at at smug self serving arsehole councillors (times like that I respect the shinners when they don't turn up. I understand their shame and embarrassment after all their armed wing blew one of these up) and then off round the corner for a pint and a bowl of stew. It upsets the bar staff to see me properly dressed and still having a good time. There is always one asks parent where he got the medals,he then regales them with tales of whatever book he happens to be reading, Hes done WW1, the Indian Mutiny and Vietnam I've been trying to get him to read Biggles sometimes it's just too easy.
But it's always a cold bitter day.
 
#13
asks parent where he got the medals,he then regales them with tales of whatever book he happens to be reading, Hes done WW1, the Indian Mutiny and Vietnam I've been trying to get him to read Biggles sometimes it's just too easy.
But it's always a cold bitter day.
Kids i tell then the truth ' Naffi line out, Washing my knicks under fire etc
Parents whatever comes to mind
Mind you its better now than it was 5 years ago, at least you get one or two shake your hand and say thank you as well as the offer of a pint. Also the DWP when i worked there would always let me go in office time, rather than booking a few hours off
Flogging the poppies is better these days with a lot more sold and more interest in what we are doing/what we have done
 
#14
To remember friends I have lost and pay my respects to the ones I did not know - it is a moment for personal reflection - "there go I but for the grace etc......"
 
#15
A whole host of reasons, really. Decency, habit, sense of obligation, sense of right-ness, to teach my kids what it's all about and occasionally to remind myself of it too.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#16
I didnt go for years until my oldest was a cadet and I drove him to the local one! Since then I go as often as I can, its not often I get to dust off the Blazer and now its getting baggier and looser I'm even happier!
 
#17
Couple of options the decent thing, I'd say pay quiet respects and fuck off home but I end up on the slash with the old and bold all and sundry. And its nice to get the suit out once a year and polish up my enormous rack
 
#19
For me it's all about my mates, I spend the entire service reflecting on them. Then I go to the mess cos it's expected, but I thin out asafp..... mostly because I don't really see the day as just another excuse to get wankered, it's a bit more special than that.
 

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