Remembrance 2006

#1
As we spend this week in the spirit of Remembrance I felt it would be valuable to add resources here that are in keeping with this theme.

Web resources, images, poems and prose, that are dignified and help all those to understand the spirit of remembrance:

Remembrance
 
#2
BoomShackerLacker said:
As we spend this week in the spirit of Remembrance I felt it would be valuable to add resources here that are in keeping with this theme.

Web resources, images, poems and prose, that are dignified and help all those to understand the spirit of remembrance:

Remembrance
A good thought. Might I also take this opportunity to remember that the 11th hour of the 11th day falls on Saturday this year. Make it very clear that you are observing a minutes silence wherever you be on Saturday...pub, supermarket, library (erm..yes that might be difficult) or shopping mall.
 
#3
It seems particularly poignant at this and subsequent Remembrance services to remember that we're losing the living connection with those who fought in WWI.

I think probably for those currently in their 30s and certainly 40s upwards WWI is burnt into our consciences as a war that affected our familes' lives beyond recognition. I am still staggered when I read the numbers of lives lost, even from small town memorials.

Last surviving members of WWI
 
#4
Still the dark stain spreads between their shoulder blades,
A mute reminder of the Poppy fields and graves,
When the fight was over, we spent what they had made but...
In the bottom of our hearts we felt the final cut.


We will remember them.
 
#5
I will start off by saying, I am 17 years old. Thank you, thank you to all of you brave people, you brave proud heroes; I and many others of my generation owe you everything, you owe us nothing. You are true heroes, yet many wouldn't admit it. I hope you all see this, and that you, and what you did are appreciated. You made the ultimate sacrifice for God, king (Queen) and country. God bless you, thank you... James, Southend on Sea

This and others from the BBC remembrance site
 
#7
Very moving site, nice to know some people still hold us in a very high regard it kind of makes it all worth while.
 
F

fozzy

Guest
#8
BoomShackerLacker said:
It seems particularly poignant at this and subsequent Remembrance services to remember that we're losing the living connection with those who fought in WWI.

I think probably for those currently in their 30s and certainly 40s upwards WWI is burnt into our consciences as a war that affected our familes' lives beyond recognition. I am still staggered when I read the numbers of lives lost, even from small town memorials.

Last surviving members of WWI
Well said BSL. I remember at Primary school back in the early 70's, our WW2 veteran headmaster inviting one of the many WW1 veterans we had living in our village at that time, to speak to us at assembly. Made a huge impression on me. Still feel deeply moved every time I pass a village war memorial.

However, lets not forget that we suffered our 121st loss in Iraq today. This along with the 41 we have lost in Afghanistan That will mean 162 families greiving for a loved one.
 
#9
My youngest daughter made me SO proud today


Amongst her class, 5 years old, she was the ONLY child who knew what the poppy was for - the headmistress asked if anyone in the class knew, only one child put their hand up "its to remember all those who died in the war miss, my great grandad fought in Burma and my great uncle in the Falklands"

I know where she'll be on sunday!
 
#11
My 13 year old son who is in the ATC marced up to his CO and asked permision to lay the wreath on the rememberance parade.
The CO aske him why and he replied "I would be humbled by the experence of remembering the heros of the past, It means a lot to me as I had many relatives die in the past wars and i just want to show my respect sir "
need i say more
I know where we will be on Sunday
 
#13
#14
I am sorry to quote PM's from people, but I received this from Fairmaid in response to my comment on RP:

thanks for that

particularly poignant as I wanted to take the pics for my dad (his mother's brother, died Nov 1918), so he was very chuffed to see his grandchildren showing respect

my dad died this year, he was a tankie in Italy and Palestine, his brother and my cousin did the full stint with the Royal Scots Greys, I was brought up to respect those that have gone before us

and in fact last year my dad gave me a red hackle (Black Watch) at the time of the amalgamation of the Scottish regiments that had been given to him on VE day in 1945 by a Black Watch major. I wore it last year at the RBL service in Notre Dame de Paris, when the Black Watch were the only regiment to be mentioned during the service
I replied:

Wear everything with pride, and when people ask you, tell them the story why. I visited the Death Railway a few years ago and, when I wasn't sweating, I was crying. For our tomorrow, they gave their today.

I have been in the Army 19 (oouch) years now. Last Op Tour I did was with the Kingos on Telic 2, and its the thing that made me cry like a hoo tonight, was not the fact I knew him the boy (19!) that died (which I didn't) but the fact that people I know knew him.

Just remember, you never lose someone. They die. I didn't lose my mum, I would have spent the last 18 months looking if I didn't know where she was buried. You will always think you see them eventually though, albeit in your dreams, in the street ( it's never them), or when you meet them for the last time.

They are always looking over you, and looking after you and they are always in your heart. Which is why you will never lose them. They are in your heart. Always.
That's all I have to say about that really.
 
#15
Dale the snail said:
They are always looking over you, and looking after you and they are always in your heart. Which is why you will never lose them. They are in your heart. Always.


That's all I have to say about that really.
that says it all
 
#16
"Please wear a poppy," the lady said,
And held one forth, but I shook my head,
Then I stopped and watched as she offered them there,
And her face was old and lined with care;

But beneath the scars the years had made
There remained a smile that refused to fade.
A boy came whistling down the street,
Bouncing along on care-free feet.

His smile was full of joy and fun,
"Lady," said he, "may I have one?"
When she'd pinned it on, he turned to say;
"Why do we wear a poppy today?"

The lady smiled in her wistful way
And answered; "This is Remembrance Day.
And the poppy there is a symbol for
The gallant men who died in war.

And because they did, you and I are free -
That's why we wear a poppy, you see.
I had a boy about your size,
With golden hair and big blue eyes.

He loved to play and jump and shout,
Free as a bird, he would race about.
As the years went by, he learned and grew,
And became a man - as you will, too.

He was fine and strong, with a boyish smile,
But he'd seemed with us such a little while
When war broke out and he went away.
I still remember his face that day.

When he smiled at me and said, 'Goodbye,
I'll be back soon, Mum, please don't cry.'
But the war went on and he had to stay,
And all I could do was wait and pray.

His letters told of the awful fight
(I can see it still in my dreams at night),
With the tanks and guns and cruel barbed wire,
And the mines and bullets, the bombs and fire.

Till at last, at last, the war was won -
And that's why we wear a poppy, son."
The small boy turned as if to go,
Then said: "Thanks, lady, I'm glad to know.

I slunk away in a sort of shame,
And if you were me, you'd have done the same:
For our thanks, in giving, if oft delayed,
Though our freedom was bought - and thousands paid!

And so, when we see a poppy worn,
Let us reflect on the burden borne
By those who gave their very all
When asked to answer their country's call
That we at home in peace might live.
Then wear a poppy! Remember - and Give!

by Don Crawford
 
#17
"Their blood and their toil, their endurance and patriotism, have made us and all who come after us forever their debtors....our homage must not only find expression on our lips; it must also show itself forth in our deeds."
President Theodore Roosevelt, 1903.
 
#18
This is an article in today's DT regarding the flag that was used to cover he coffin of The Unknown Warrior at the state funeral in 1920. It had been carried throughout WWI by Padre Railton who put forward the idea of a Unknown Warrior.
It was used at the last communion of a soldier sentenced to be shot at dawn. In services before Ypres, High Wood, Passchendaele, Cambrai, at Vimy Ridge and before the battle of the Somme. It flew at heart rending roll calls after battle when name after name was read out and answered only by silence and as the last covering for hundreds of bodies
Surely a pedigree worthy of recognition. It is on display in a side chapel. Irony is that after more than 30 years on display it was moved awy from The Tomb as it 'was obscuring TV sightlines' Huh!
There is a campaign to have the flag returned to it's rightful place with a proper history. Prince of Darkness and Andy McNab are supporting this so one may say it has very wide appeal.
Surely this Flag of the Old Soldiers deserves better. The very display of it's past would do much to cause today's generation to become more aware of the horrors of war and the justifiable pride of those who took part despite this horror to defend their way of life.

This forum has a great membership. Surely we can get behind this with all our support?
 
#19
I'd agree with this. Letter to your MP and a letter to Dean of Westminster Abbey is easy enough. Anyone want to make up a draft letter (I'm too lazy :oops:)?
 

Similar threads


Latest Threads

Top