Relations between USA and the UK

Discussion in 'Current Affairs, News and Analysis' started by KGB_resident, Feb 7, 2007.

  1. closer than now

  2. on the current level (agreed with the PM)

  3. as good as with other Western countries

  4. as mr.Hague sees them

  5. as with any country

  6. as with an enemy


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    Whom do you support in this question: learned mr.Hague or highly esteemed mr.Blair?

    The last option has been added only to make the list complete.
  2. I think the problem is that we are only 'Perfidiious Albion' [cosy up to any barsteward as long as it's in our interests] these days for the benefit of Bliar and Co and not the United Kingdoms.
  3. Its only natural that Hague and his mob would capitalise on Bliar's misfortune, I've no doubt they'd be in the same boat if the positions were reversed.
    I get very hacked off by Washington's view of the outside world, its horrible foreign policy, and frankly very embarrassed by the fact that no matter who is power in the UK, they'll bend over and give the US whatever it needs.
    Off the track, I can't say I'm a huge fan of Mr Putin's world view, his foreign policy, or his (allegedly) radioactive glow in the dark assassins at the FSB
  4. Biped

    Biped LE Book Reviewer

    We should maintain whatever influence we have with the US (which is a lot less since Bliar came to power) whilst improving our links as fast and as comprehensively as we possibly can with EVERYONE else.

    We are not a puppy 52nd state to kow-tow to US hedgemony. We are an independent nation state, and as such we should be cultivating all those who will provide benefits to the UK, its economy and its people.

    Our relationship with the US cannot be allowed to interfere with our own global interests.

    There is no reason why we cannot work very hard to cultivate both India and China, especially as most US manufacturing is done in Chinese factories. The US cannot have an issue with us doing the same.
  5. Likely.
  6. <Cynical mode on>

    Ah yes. The Special Relationship. But only special when a Certain Well Known Western Superpower decides.........

    <Cynical mode stays on>
  7. Do you think the following applies?

    “Nations have no permanent friends or allies, they only have permanent interests"
  8. We're poor cousins, a shoulder to lean on. UK thinks and behaves 1940s big and cannot come to terms that there is only so much an island can do in the 21st century.

    We do have a great tourist industry though.
  9. So what are 'permanent interests' of the UK?
  13. To an extent, but the view exists here in the US that is overwhelmingly positive of the UK and its citizens--that's among our citizens and politicians. In the US Army you'll generally hear nothing but good things about Brits in general. You'll rarely hear anything negative about the UK from either the left or the right in this country. It doesn't seem to be reciprocated if this or other sites are anything to go on, a realization that would surprise most Americans I think.
  14. I think you'll find most people are fond of the US , you just don't understand our humour and the way we like to whinge every now and then.

    There are rabidly anti-american people in the UK, but those people are probably also rabidly anti-British, the rest of us are just taking the p*ss.
  15. I think part of that is the result of very differing attitudes about the military between the UK and US. Without meaning to denigrate all US troops, the sheer size of the US military means there's always a much larger contingent numpties.

    Contrast that with the relatively small military of the UK where poor performance is much more highly visible and thus quickly weeded out.

    Again, I think 99.999% of the US armed forces are highly professional and very good at their jobs- who I'm happy to work alongside, but the fact is the 00.001% of incompetence would probably make up a force about 1/4 the size of the British army.

    Combine that with the much less 'c'est la guerre' culture of the UK and it becomes clearer why some incidents leave us with a bad and lasting impression out of all proportion.