Regiment plans to be rushed through

#41
Ahh Hackle! Touched a nerve there with your remark on seniority! Wondered when tribalism would rear its head!

Seriously though. As a former member of a famous and very senior Scottish Regiment and one which survived its 315 years of glorious history without ever having suffered amalgamation, the only one, with the exception of The First of Foot I might add! It goes without saying that I'm extremely saddened and disgusted by the Large Regiment proposal and also frustrated, living in the USA, at being unable to participate more actively in our fight to save the Scottish regiments.

Though being 'Tribal' (its a Scottish thing) and a former member of one of the regiments facing amalgamation AND being consumed by the Large regiment I cant help thinking that perhaps the disbandment of the consistently worst recruited regiment in the (Scottish) Division would have been infinitely preferable (and much fairer) to amalgamation. Or am I being selfish and overly tribal? Logically, I suppose, the amalgamation of the 1st and 25th of foot is merely a continuation of the reforms of 1881, 1959/60, 1968 and 1990. Though it still hurts, this time around it makes no sense which exacerbates the pain.
 
#42
Busterdog said:
Ahh Hackle! Touched a nerve there with your remark on seniority! Wondered when tribalism would rear its head!

Seriously though. As a former member of a famous and very senior Scottish Regiment and one which survived its 315 years of glorious history without ever having suffered amalgamation, the only one, with the exception of The First of Foot I might add! It goes without saying that I'm extremely saddened and disgusted by the Large Regiment proposal and also frustrated, living in the USA, at being unable to participate more actively in our fight to save the Scottish regiments.

Though being 'Tribal' (its a Scottish thing) and a former member of one of the regiments facing amalgamation AND being consumed by the Large regiment I cant help thinking that perhaps the disbandment of the consistently worst recruited regiment in the (Scottish) Division would have been infinitely preferable (and much fairer) to amalgamation. Or am I being selfish and overly tribal? Logically, I suppose, the amalgamation of the 1st and 25th of foot is merely a continuation of the reforms of 1881, 1959/60, 1968 and 1990. Though it still hurts, this time around it makes no sense which exacerbates the pain.
LOL, busterdog! It was a touch of healthy tribalism on my part maybe, but in one of my earlier posts I suggested that "we" (the Scottish Division, and the Infantry in general) are really all in this together.
All this is forcing some of us (well, me) to brush up on regimental history. Somehow I thought there were in all three regiments in the Division which had never been amalgamated.
 
#43
I'm extremely saddened and disgusted by the Large Regiment proposal and also frustrated, living in the USA, at being unable to participate more actively in our fight to save the Scottish regiments
Busterdog, one of the organisers of the Save the Scottish Regiments initative does post here. I'm sure she has plenty of suggestions how you can help on your side of the pond. :D
 
#44
The problem is Bliar and his cabal of friends will get in as instead of making an informed decision many will either not bother or do as they did last time, pity really as they are the ones who complain the most. I still think that the big plan is to reduce as much aspossible to a reservist/TA force.
 
#45
Magnus Linklater (who has a very honourable family connection with the Black Watch) in today's Scotland on Sunday:
Dark days for Black Watch

A highly dangerous mission in Iraq and the prospect of disbandment are a fierce double blow to the Scottish regiment.
The sight of Warrior fighting vehicles heading off, with Saltire and Union flags fluttering from their bonnets, was a typical Black Watch touch, reminiscent of the early days of the Second World War, when the regiment protested against an order to abandon the kilt for trousers. The reason they were given was that wearing the tartan would identify them to the enemy. "But damn it, we want to be identified," said the company sergeant-major.

That regimental spirit is its greatest strength. Every journalist who has seen the Black Watch in action in Basra has talked about the way it has held together, under attack and provocation, maintaining order on the streets, while at the same time winning hearts and minds amongst the local population. One serving officer I spoke to recently said that 90% of what the regiment had achieved in Iraq had never hit the headlines at all. "I am more proud of what we have done for the schools and the hospitals of Basra than I am about the military action we have been involved in," he said.

The unique qualities of the Scottish regiments have not been lost on the Americans. "In the field of counter-insurgency," said a recent leader in the Washington Post the regiments "have the hard-won knowledge of decades of frustrating small-war experience, in Northern Ireland and elsewhere. Their soldiers and generals have learned a great deal about pacifying distant trouble spots, knowledge from which the Yanks could and should have benefited." And it concluded: "This is not the time to thin the red line to breaking point."
The new structure is unlikely to save money and it will do little to solve the problem of the "arms plot," the system whereby individual regiments are given a new role and different location every five or six years. This, General Jackson believes, is inefficient and expensive. Better by far, he says, to have larger regimental formations which would be given set roles and fixed locations, with individual officers and soldiers able to swap around within two or three battalions. But the reality of what is happening on the ground in Iraq and elsewhere, suggests that what is really needed is well-trained infantry detachments with peace-keeping experience, and the ability to work with local populations as well as each other.
Well, you get the idea. Full article at http://news.scotsman.com/topics.cfm?tid=1207&id=1258432004
Interesting comments ref retention.
 
#46
A Fresh Perspective from Scotland

Someone has sent me this cutting from the Letters Page of the 'Press and Journal"

SIR, - Why are Scottish Regiments used for forward fighting positions when it comes to a war, when at the same time the Government inform us that the population is becoming smaller in Scotland. If this is so, our soldiers should be used for home defence and maybe the Scottish population will grow.

James Irvine
......
Glasgow
 
#47
Defence cuts story from today's Scotsman

Cuts to armed forces will total £6bn, MoD admits

THE government has finally come clean on the massive scale of the cuts it is proposing to make to Britain’s armed forces, identifying £6 billion of savings it hopes to achieve over the next three years.

Geoff Hoon, the Defence Secretary, has previously insisted that money had nothing to do with proposed manpower cuts, which include the loss of one Scottish infantry battalion and the merger of the remaining units into one super regiment.

But a document released by the Ministry of Defence makes clear that civil servants plan to meet financial targets imposed on them by the Treasury by doing away with large chunks of the armed forces, including the historic regiments. They have even offered to save £250 million more than the Treasury has demanded.
...
Political pressure is mounting on ministers to back down and some senior Cabinet members favour a compromise over the regiments to ease the political embarrassment.
...
But the new MoD document makes it clear that cuts in military manpower and the closure of airbases remain at the heart of the government’s defence policy.

Cuts in manpower alone are expected to save some £725 million and lead to the closure of up to 20 RAF bases.

There are also plans to streamline what is termed the "force structure" of the army, Royal Navy and Royal Air Force to save just under £1 billion. That is the projected savings from cutting the number of tanks, warships and aircraft in service, and prominent in these plans is a reduction in the number of Nimrod MR2 maritime patrol aircraft based at RAF Kinloss in Moray.

Proposals to save more than £2.3 billion from the logistic support budget are driving plans to concentrate the RAF’s remaining aircraft at "a few super bases to deliver very significant cashable savings and reductions in headcount".

The huge scope and scale of the cuts being envisaged by the ministry were not revealed by Mr Hoon when he announced his package of reductions in July. At the time, Mr Hoon boasted that he had secured an extra £3.7 billion for his department, representing a 1.4 per cent increase in real-term spending.

But it now appears from the newly released data that almost all of that extra money has been absorbed paying for cost overruns on equipment procurement, the Iraq war and buying new network-centric warfare systems to enable the British to operate alongside US forces in the "global war on terror". Gordon Brown, the Chancellor, has, in effect, forced Mr Hoon to cut the existing forces to pay for future weapons.

The cuts affect almost every aspect of Britain’s armed forces. The ministry admits that its much heralded "smart procurement" initiative has so far not delivered enough savings, and greater efforts are needed to secure more "cashable efficiency benefits".

These include reducing the funding for replacement of the RAF Tornado fleet. A reduction in the number of helicopters being purchased to transport army troops is also indicated in the MoD document.

"Smart" weapons for the Royal Artillery are being cut and the funding on a new family of "airportable" armoured vehicles to spearhead rapid reaction missions is also being reduced to save £1 billion.

The Royal Scots Dragoon Guards and the army’s other armoured regiments will have many of their tanks taken away and mothballed in an effort to save more than £250 million.
full story at http://news.scotsman.com/topics.cfm?tid=1207&id=1259982004
 
#48
The story's a bit of a rehash, Hackle. If you look on the military aircrew section of Pprune, you'll find the Crabs have been talking about the cuts for months and have even identified bases likely to be chopped. More proof, if any were needed, however, that the whole exercise viz-a-viz the regiments is Treasury-driven. :twisted:
 

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