Referendum on constitutional change this Friday.

#25
True, but at a much lower level than other countries. Brakes will come off now and you can be sure the 12 weeks will be next to be moved.
12 weeks is pretty standard in most of the countries in Europe. It's the UK that is out of step and getting close to the viability figure. I don't see any of our brave politicians thinking of shortening our current figure.
 
#26
What's the feeling Irishers?

I have no dog in this hunt but is this the last yawp of Catholicism in the republic? There's plenty of heat in the abortion debate to be had but is there much light?

I'll admit I've only been following this through Radio 4, so I have no great grasp of the intricacies, whats the money on, a change or no change?
Didn't come across this thread until now so it's a little like being wise after the event but I was confident of a narrow Yes victory. I didn't anticipate the margin of victory though (66.4% to 33.6%). It's significant given the financial support the No side had and direct interference by foreigners, notably US pro-lifers.

I was impressed by the number of people who travelled home to vote. One of my nephews flew from Canada to do his bit.
 
#27
The Irish nation has some previous with regards to referenda.

Such is their commitment to democracy that they will keep plugging away doggedly until the electorate finally reach the correct decision. In this regard they were years ahead of 'remain'.

Brendan O'Neill: Asking the Irish to vote again on the Lisbon treaty is arrogant, insulting and undemocratic

It was an EU directive but could not possibly have been achieved without the active collusion of the Irish government.
So? A country can hold all the referendums it wants. Nothing prevents the electorate from voting the same way every time. Or not as they wish. We also voted twice before repealing the constitutional ban on divorce which was nothing to do with the EU.
 
Last edited:
#28
Once you legitimise killing the unborn, everything else becomes so much easier to justify.
If they'd had it when your mum was gestating we'd not have as many dross posts to wade through.
 
#30
It's a logical fallacy to equate a foetus with an actual living human being.
Not in Ireland, they recognise(d) that an unborn foetus as a legal entity, with the same rights as living human beings. GB recognise that only once born.
 
#31
So? A country can hold all the referendums it wants. Nothing prevents the electorate from voting the same way every time. Or not as they wish. We also voted twice before repealing the constitutional ban on divorce which was nothing to do with the EU.
9 year gap between them
 
#33
Not in Ireland, they recognise(d) that an unborn foetus as a legal entity, with the same rights as living human beings. GB recognise that only once born.
A logical fallacy is a logical fallacy even when muppets put it in a Constitution.
 
#36
Attitudes change
Obviously. I'm just not sure what was the relevance of pointing out that there was a nine year gap between the divorce referendums.

There was a 15 month gap between the first Lisbon referendum on 12 June 2008 and the second on 2 October 2009. Obviously attitudes between those dates changed as well presumably because the useless government of that fúckwit Brian Cowen got its finger out and explained to people what they were voting on. Similarly the Nice Referendum in 2001/2002.
 
#38
21 weeks can survive, what’s with the moment of birth @ 36 weeks argument.
At 22 weeks about 6% of premature babies survive. It's irrelevant though. The life of the pregnant woman takes precedence in all circumstances and at any stage of pregnancy.
 
#40
Obviously. I'm just not sure what was the relevance of pointing out that there was a nine year gap between the divorce referendums.

There was a 15 month gap between the first Lisbon referendum on 12 June 2008 and the second on 2 October 2009. Obviously attitudes between those dates changed as well presumably because the useless government of that fúckwit Brian Cowen got its finger out and explained to people what they were voting on. Similarly the Nice Referendum in 2001/2002.
That’s what I meant

We voted twice on Lisbon and Nice (relatively soon after, unlike divorce) because the Politicians hadn’t (a) explained it will enough and (b) negotiated a good enough deal
 

Similar threads

Latest Threads

Top