Red Sash

#41
An excellent description of the correct use of 'a quizzical eye' whilst inspecting.
IMHO Queensman was way too gentle. There should have been much "take his hat and belt, Sergeant Major" and "DUFDAKDUFDAK"-ing towards the Guardroom, where a bumper had been prepared for use on the ceiling :wink:
 
#42
The RGJ never wore a sash as they are descended from the Rifle Brigade which never carried colours into battle but had their honours on their cap badge. They skirmished rather than advancing in lines with the Colours at the rear centre.

The SNCOs in the Colour Party in Regts also wore the red sash, as said earlier, to be a rallying point. :wink:
Are you sure about that? I thought the rifle brigade's bugles where their equivalent to colours.

I also think that the rifle brigade sometimes fought in close-order, mainly in the presence of enemy cavalry.

Note: I am referring to late 18th early 19th Century "Napoleonic" era rifles (ninety fifth and sixtieth) here.

I also doubt that a sash could be a rallying point. Hard to spot in the midst of a battle. Colours/Bugles OTOH, stand out pretty well. As do drums/pipes.
 
1

1969peps

Guest
#43
Drill cse = correct answer. Ex-Inf = Garbage!
Old thread I know, but a lot of tales about the Sash, does this sound correct to anyone who actually knows the history or is there another version?

Used by the Sergeant when fighting in line to pull injured back out the line, the cords at the base were used as modern day CAS AMMO card, tie a knot for injured, cut off the cord for dead. tie off the cords (84 total) according to what number you have in your platoon. So you can tally up your casualties and dead.
 
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Mr_Fingerz

LE
Book Reviewer
#44
Holy thread resurrection Batman.

@1969peps is English your second language?
 
#45
RMP wear the sash after attending the Drill Instructors course... if they pass:

How I laughed when hearing that a complete tw@t had phoned up bubbing to the PSAO because on being inspected at first parade of said course, the Guards instructor asked him to present wrists - where on orders does it say watch? Guardhouse for 24 hours of beasting, go.
Next day, on parade, he turns up sans watch, Guards instructor tells him to present wrists? Why are you not wearing a watch? Good RMP should always know the time - Guardhouse, beasting, go... Bless him.

@ACAB there is a Guardsman who I owe a beer.
 
#47
RMP wear the sash after attending the Drill Instructors course... if they pass:

How I laughed when hearing that a complete tw@t had phoned up bubbing to the PSAO because on being inspected at first parade of said course, the Guards instructor asked him to present wrists - where on orders does it say watch? Guardhouse for 24 hours of beasting, go.
Next day, on parade, he turns up sans watch, Guards instructor tells him to present wrists? Why are you not wearing a watch? Good RMP should always know the time - Guardhouse, beasting, go... Bless him.

@ACAB there is a Guardsman who I owe a beer.
A day early for the thread resurrection, no?
 
#48
Last I saw (pre 96) INT CORPS drill instructor SNCOs/WOs at depot wore a cypress green sash - for obvious reasons. Never saw it anywhere else. Not as pretty as the red one, of course.
11 years later.... The Cypress green sash was never signed off by the dress committee and was illegal. Hense drillies now wear the normal red one. Think CSMs and RSMs are wearing Scarlet.

Sent from my LG-H815 using Tapatalk
 
#49
As mentioned above, the black sash used to be RCT - I don't know if it has ben carried over to RLC now. :wink:
Interesting ! I never heard of or saw a "black" sash, not saying you're wrong,
our orderly sgts wore a red one and carried a cane.so did the orderly corporal come to think of it.
 
#50
Infantry, though some regiments (RGJ - I think) don't wear them. Normally worn over the right shoulder though the old SCLI wore them officer fashion over the left shoulder, don't know if the LI continued that tradition.
The ONLY regiments to wear the sash over the left shoulder are the 32nd foot (SCLI) and later, The Light Infantry...now the Rifles (who don't wear a sash), The Light Infantry also wore the Inkerman chain and whistle on the sash.
 
#52
I was informed in the dim and distant past by a drill instructor that the history of the sash comes from pikemen. It was worn over the shoulder as the pikeman would wipe his hands on it as the blood from horses would come down the pike and he would lose his grip. It would become blood red with time and experience. Eventually these men would become sergeants and it became a badge of rank. Hence he always went apoplectic at the RAF Regiment as their sashes are sky blue and they didn't know the meaning of colour, he claimed.
I'd be surprised as sashes were typically only worn by officers in the days of pikes. A bloodrag wound round the shaft of the pike just under the head prevented blood running down it in theory. In practice most pikemen never actually used them. One bloke [I want to say Bariffe, but it might have been Ward] trailed a pike thorough most of the Thirty Years War and wrote a book on instruction for the English Civil War. He'd never used his.
 
#53
Further to other replies. The sash previously worn by Pikemen was then warn by Sergeants and Warrant Officers when on duty as a badge of authority and also a rallying point.
Would you mind providing me with a source for this, because I've never found one and would be interested.
 

smeg-head

ADC
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#55
I don't remember that. I mean I remember sgts always had a chip on their shoulder cos they are sgts. But remember at 11 sigs and 28sigs red sashes worn over No2 normally on ceremonial and was told they were designated colour sgts. Wether it was true or not I can't say.
Being an ex-scaley SNCO, I know that the Royal Corps wore Navy Blue sashes for SNCO's and Warrant Officers.

I served in York Barracks, Munster in the late seventies, sharing the camp with 4RTR. Senior NCO's and WO's in the RTR were definitely wearing Black sashes when on duty.
 

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