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Recruits - What do they call them now???

#1
A long time ago when I was an instructor at the Depot we had several names for the unsuspecting creatures that turned up to be "moulded" into fighting soldiers, I know a long time earlier I was one of them!

I remember that the yanks used the term "rookies" for raw recruits so of course the obvious Enlish translation was "Crow"

So it all recruits were called "Crows" for a period of time, that then somehow transmogrified into "Joe Crow" and then shorthend to "Joe or Joseph"

What is the updated term for recruits currently utilised by depot instructors? ( not the PC versions please)

And has anyone any different colloquial terms for the said creatures??? (not counting Cnut of course!!)
 
#3
No1_port_side said:
A long time ago when I was an instructor at the Depot we had several names for the unsuspecting creatures that turned up to be "moulded" into fighting soldiers, I know a long time earlier I was one of them!

I remember that the yanks used the term "rookies" for raw recruits so of course the obvious Enlish translation was "Crow"

So it all recruits were called "Crows" for a period of time, that then somehow transmogrified into "Joe Crow" and then shorthend to "Joe or Joseph"

What is the updated term for recruits currently utilised by depot instructors? ( not the PC versions please)

And has anyone any different colloquial terms for the said creatures??? (not counting Cnut of course!!)
I used to use:

1. FNG(s)......................... Fukking New Guy (s)
2. Mong......................... Spin the mong, on the range, after doing 10 fast circles static with head down, eyes open, then run from 200-300 point, first mong to fall over does it backwards
3. Pole.......................... From 'Tadpole' which came from 'Pond life' which ended up as 'pole'
 
#7
Tango said:
The obvious one which has been missed out - sprog.

Haven't a bloody clue of the derivation.
sprog - child, youngster, raw recruit - according to Cassell's slang dictionary, sprog is from an 18th century word sprag, meaning a 'lively fellow', although the origin of sprag is not given. Sprog seems to have been used commonly by the RAF in the 1930's with reference to new recruits, possibly derived from a distortion of 'sprout' (something that is growing), or from either or both of these spoonerisms (inversion of initial letter-sounds): sprocket and cog (reference to being a small part in a big machine) or frog-spawn (frog egg being a possible association to a new recruit or young man)
From http://www.businessballs.com/clichesorigins.htm
 

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