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Recruit application and assessment sticky 2020 - all related chat in here

Hi All, just got back from my assessment centre and I thought I'd give a detailed post for those of you, like me who prefer to have all the details. We had the opportunity to arrive by car or train, and I chose car, so this experience might differ slightly for those of you going by train.

I was told the be there for 5pm, although I arrived at 4.30pm, and saw several other cars in the parking lot already, I was advised to park up along a certain row and wait. At 4.45, a staff member approached each car individually, telling us to get our stuff, put our masks on, and meet by the gate. Once here he checked if anyone was from a lockdown area (one was, he got sent home) or if anyone was suffering flu like symptoms for Covid. We then went in one by one, showed our photo ID, received our Bib number (important you don't forget this!) and waited for everyone else to come through.

At 5 to 5 ish, we walked single file to the main building in the assessment centre, and lined up in ranks of three, it's amazing just how many people can't count to 3 apparently. We were then given a short introduction, and headed into the rec room to pick up our red and yellow bibs (this is where the number is needed.) Several people picked up the wrong number, don't be that guy! After putting the bibs on and being given an introduction to the one way system, we filed into a computer room, picking up a bottle of water and a pen along the way. You have to keep both with you at all times throughout the assessment, so try not to lose them. We went straight onto the computers to conduct the Army Cognitive Test (ACT). While we were doing this, the recruits who came by train arrived, and filed into a separate room for a powerpoint presentation on the schedule for the weekend, and the does and don'ts of our time there. Once we finished our ACT, we formed up outside the main building in ranks of 3, and when everyone had finished, we paraded to get an evening meal. The soup was terrible, the pasta was ok, the meatball was delicious and the potatoes bland. Once we had eaten, we paraded back to the main building, where we went to the lecture hall for the presentation, and the trainbound recruits took their ACT.

After they had finished, we waited while they completed their tests, and joined us. It was at this point they offered us the opportunity to do our Technical Selection Tests (TST) instead of waiting until the morning. Everyone doing it agreed. It was a 45 minute math test, with 55 questions, and I believe the highest score you need for any technical role is 26. This is pretty easy, although it's worth brushing up on indices and factorisation if it's been a while since you left school.

Once we had completed that, we paraded to the accommodation blocks, where we were given our assigned rooms. (4 to a room). 2 of the guys were already in the room as they didn't do TSTs, and they had already showered. It was 2030 by this point, we had until 2130 to go for a smoke (if you wanted) and lights out by 2200. The staff come round to do a head count and check in at this time.

Wake up call was at 0530, although in our room we agreed to do a 5.15 alarm, so we could get the room ready for 0545 inspection (essentially disinfect the bed and leave fresh sheets and covers on). I woke up early, at 0500 and decided to take advantage of a morning shower. At 0545, once staff were happy with our room, we lined up outside (ranks of three again) and paraded to get breakfast. The guys who chose to just have porridge or cereal got to go first, although we weren't doing any exercise until late morning / early afternoon. If you chose the hot breakfast, expect one bacon, one sausage, one egg (fried or poached) and your choice of tomatoes or beans. Toast is available, but the toaster takes forever.

Being at the back of the line, we had about 5 minutes to eat breakfast, then on the move back to accommodation to collect our IDs/qualifications. Before we went in, they called bib numbers, and those who didn't need to sit the maths / english tests, and those who didn't need to retake removed their top Yellow bib, to signify no more exams. Inside, they prioritised those of us that need spirometery tests, calling them forward first. They ask you to sign a few forms and they take the ID away with them. Once you have done this, it's back to waiting in the reception area until the medical teams are ready. It took an hour and ten minutes of waiting before they engaged us, and then we were taken through the eyesight tests, BMI checks, ECG, and audio tests. Once you have done this, back to another waiting area for the doctors to review the results. I waited here for around 1 hour 45 minutes, although some people were in much quicker depending on the results they had.

When in with the doctor, they go through injuries, fitness, workout routines etc, and then do multiple joint and limb checks. You will have to raise your legs, do duck walks, single and double leg squats, and 5 press ups. If you have it, any electronic copies of your exercise can make a big difference if you have injuries etc or they doubt your fitness levels.Out of the 20 people I saw go in before me, 3 passed, 8 failed, and 9 were either TMU'd, or had to repeat one of the tests.

I would have passed, but I had to do a spirometry test, so back into the waiting room for me! When it finally was time, I had to blow as hard and as long as I could into a peak flow meter, while they analysed the results on the laptop.I had to do this 4 times.

I then went back to the medical centre, received my official medical pass, and went to wait for the physical fitness tests.(PFTs) It was lunch (1200) by this point, so they provided a sandwich, a banana, a bag of crisps, and a chocolate bar. I ate everything but the sandwich as I didn't want to be full when running.

After around 45 minutes of waiting, we were taken to do the static pull and the ball throw, I can't stress how easy there are and how little you should worry about them. Another 20 minutes went by and it was bleep test time. 6 of us in a socially distanced line ran, and everyone got the score that they needed. This was stopped after 11.6, although I have heard from others it is sometimes allowed to go on.

Next step, back to accommodation to get a shower, suit up, and take myself and my bags to the lecture hall to wait for the interview. They had a movie on in the background, and left me waiting for around 10 minutes. (again, some were longer.) The interview essentially consisted of me hearing my results for each test, and PFT, and asking a few questions about what I know about phase 1 training, and what would be taught there. He told me a little about the opportunities in the army, awarded me an A grade, then provided some advice around start / assessment dates.

The final step was to collect my Identification back, and wait 10 minutes for a staff member to escort me back to the car park, where I could go home.

I hope this helps anyone nervous, feel free to ask me questions!

Which centre was this?
 

Crow22

Swinger
This is so detailed and helpful thank you! :) which ac did you go to? When you’re doing the bleep test , are the levels called out? Thanks and congrats on passing yours!

Lichfield, and the tape is very much a standard one. Three beeps to start, and at the end of every level, when it also announces which level you're on.
 

Jordan8w

Swinger
Hi All, just got back from my assessment centre and I thought I'd give a detailed post for those of you, like me who prefer to have all the details. We had the opportunity to arrive by car or train, and I chose car, so this experience might differ slightly for those of you going by train.

I was told the be there for 5pm, although I arrived at 4.30pm, and saw several other cars in the parking lot already, I was advised to park up along a certain row and wait. At 4.45, a staff member approached each car individually, telling us to get our stuff, put our masks on, and meet by the gate. Once here he checked if anyone was from a lockdown area (one was, he got sent home) or if anyone was suffering flu like symptoms for Covid. We then went in one by one, showed our photo ID, received our Bib number (important you don't forget this!) and waited for everyone else to come through.

At 5 to 5 ish, we walked single file to the main building in the assessment centre, and lined up in ranks of three, it's amazing just how many people can't count to 3 apparently. We were then given a short introduction, and headed into the rec room to pick up our red and yellow bibs (this is where the number is needed.) Several people picked up the wrong number, don't be that guy! After putting the bibs on and being given an introduction to the one way system, we filed into a computer room, picking up a bottle of water and a pen along the way. You have to keep both with you at all times throughout the assessment, so try not to lose them. We went straight onto the computers to conduct the Army Cognitive Test (ACT). While we were doing this, the recruits who came by train arrived, and filed into a separate room for a powerpoint presentation on the schedule for the weekend, and the does and don'ts of our time there. Once we finished our ACT, we formed up outside the main building in ranks of 3, and when everyone had finished, we paraded to get an evening meal. The soup was terrible, the pasta was ok, the meatball was delicious and the potatoes bland. Once we had eaten, we paraded back to the main building, where we went to the lecture hall for the presentation, and the trainbound recruits took their ACT.

After they had finished, we waited while they completed their tests, and joined us. It was at this point they offered us the opportunity to do our Technical Selection Tests (TST) instead of waiting until the morning. Everyone doing it agreed. It was a 45 minute math test, with 55 questions, and I believe the highest score you need for any technical role is 26. This is pretty easy, although it's worth brushing up on indices and factorisation if it's been a while since you left school.

Once we had completed that, we paraded to the accommodation blocks, where we were given our assigned rooms. (4 to a room). 2 of the guys were already in the room as they didn't do TSTs, and they had already showered. It was 2030 by this point, we had until 2130 to go for a smoke (if you wanted) and lights out by 2200. The staff come round to do a head count and check in at this time.

Wake up call was at 0530, although in our room we agreed to do a 5.15 alarm, so we could get the room ready for 0545 inspection (essentially disinfect the bed and leave fresh sheets and covers on). I woke up early, at 0500 and decided to take advantage of a morning shower. At 0545, once staff were happy with our room, we lined up outside (ranks of three again) and paraded to get breakfast. The guys who chose to just have porridge or cereal got to go first, although we weren't doing any exercise until late morning / early afternoon. If you chose the hot breakfast, expect one bacon, one sausage, one egg (fried or poached) and your choice of tomatoes or beans. Toast is available, but the toaster takes forever.

Being at the back of the line, we had about 5 minutes to eat breakfast, then on the move back to accommodation to collect our IDs/qualifications. Before we went in, they called bib numbers, and those who didn't need to sit the maths / english tests, and those who didn't need to retake removed their top Yellow bib, to signify no more exams. Inside, they prioritised those of us that need spirometery tests, calling them forward first. They ask you to sign a few forms and they take the ID away with them. Once you have done this, it's back to waiting in the reception area until the medical teams are ready. It took an hour and ten minutes of waiting before they engaged us, and then we were taken through the eyesight tests, BMI checks, ECG, and audio tests. Once you have done this, back to another waiting area for the doctors to review the results. I waited here for around 1 hour 45 minutes, although some people were in much quicker depending on the results they had.

When in with the doctor, they go through injuries, fitness, workout routines etc, and then do multiple joint and limb checks. You will have to raise your legs, do duck walks, single and double leg squats, and 5 press ups. If you have it, any electronic copies of your exercise can make a big difference if you have injuries etc or they doubt your fitness levels.Out of the 20 people I saw go in before me, 3 passed, 8 failed, and 9 were either TMU'd, or had to repeat one of the tests.

I would have passed, but I had to do a spirometry test, so back into the waiting room for me! When it finally was time, I had to blow as hard and as long as I could into a peak flow meter, while they analysed the results on the laptop.I had to do this 4 times.

I then went back to the medical centre, received my official medical pass, and went to wait for the physical fitness tests.(PFTs) It was lunch (1200) by this point, so they provided a sandwich, a banana, a bag of crisps, and a chocolate bar. I ate everything but the sandwich as I didn't want to be full when running.

After around 45 minutes of waiting, we were taken to do the static pull and the ball throw, I can't stress how easy there are and how little you should worry about them. Another 20 minutes went by and it was bleep test time. 6 of us in a socially distanced line ran, and everyone got the score that they needed. This was stopped after 11.6, although I have heard from others it is sometimes allowed to go on.

Next step, back to accommodation to get a shower, suit up, and take myself and my bags to the lecture hall to wait for the interview. They had a movie on in the background, and left me waiting for around 10 minutes. (again, some were longer.) The interview essentially consisted of me hearing my results for each test, and PFT, and asking a few questions about what I know about phase 1 training, and what would be taught there. He told me a little about the opportunities in the army, awarded me an A grade, then provided some advice around start / assessment dates.

The final step was to collect my Identification back, and wait 10 minutes for a staff member to escort me back to the car park, where I could go home.

I hope this helps anyone nervous, feel free to ask me questions!
That is so helpful thank you!!! Honestly been looking for a detailed account of the assessment centre.
 

Crow22

Swinger
That is so helpful thank you!!! Honestly been looking for a detailed account of the assessment centre.
Happy to help my friend. Ran out of time while writing it so probably could have gone into further detail. Let me know if you have any questions and I'll try my best to help!
 
Thanks for this, it’s a real help, when doing the bleep test, How was it when carrying out the test, we’re you getting watched like a hawk or only when it come to like later levels?
 

Crow22

Swinger
Thanks for this, it’s a real help, when doing the bleep test, How was it when carrying out the test, we’re you getting watched like a hawk or only when it come to like later levels?
They weren't too strict with it to be honest, if you were putting your foot on the line etc they were pretty lenient, it was only when you were quite obviously not making it that they gave you a warning.
 

Dyl424

Crow
Hi all, was just wondering as to whether I have to do an eye test even with an opticians report at the AC? My left eye is very weak and the glasses make a big difference and I've been told before that you don't have to do one if you take an opticians report with?
 

Prospect1

Swinger
They weren't too strict with it to be honest, if you were putting your foot on the line etc they were pretty lenient, it was only when you were quite obviously not making it that they gave you a warning.

Anybody know the required scores as I’m joining artillery reserve now I’ve seen somewhere it’s 8 for them but my reserve centre is saying it’s 7.9 infantry is the same bleep test score on the sheet I’ve seen but again my reserve centre is telling me different btw I can already achieve level 9 on the test and my 2k run time is around 10:10 so either way I will be fine. Just don’t want others being unprepared
 

ex_sigs

Old-Salt
Did mine today, had to get level 8.7. They stopped me at 9.1 and was no one else running as they had stopped way before. As a 40 year old I thought it was pretty easy and haven’t trained. It’s 5 mins of hard work, some of the younger guys were proper struggling.
 

Crow22

Swinger
Anybody know the required scores as I’m joining artillery reserve now I’ve seen somewhere it’s 8 for them but my reserve centre is saying it’s 7.9 infantry is the same bleep test score on the sheet I’ve seen but again my reserve centre is telling me different btw I can already achieve level 9 on the test and my 2k run time is around 10:10 so either way I will be fine. Just don’t want others being unprepared

All junior entry except infantry / para - 7
RLC, Music corps, Int Corps, AAC, REME, Signals, Medical or AGC - 7.2
Royal Artillery or Royal Engineers - 7.9
Infantry or RAC - 8.7
Paras (inc. JE) 11.6

So you will need a 7.9. Typing that with the document from the assessment centre a week ago, so it's pretty up to date!
 

Jordan8w

Swinger
Getting my assessment centre very soon after a long drawn out medical appeal... Should I be worried about the cognitive and TST's?
 
Getting my assessment centre very soon after a long drawn out medical appeal... Should I be worried about the cognitive and TST's?
Don’t worry about it at all, I passed me assessment a couple of weeks ago and the cog test was one of the easiest things, I didn’t do the TST though, but honestly don’t worry about it, you’ll be sound
 

Jordan8w

Swinger
Don’t worry about it at all, I passed me assessment a couple of weeks ago and the cog test was one of the easiest things, I didn’t do the TST though, but honestly don’t worry about it, you’ll be sound
Thank you! I believe I should be ok with the medical as I did pass the RAF one however that was 5 years ago when I was 16 don't think the physical test will be too difficult. Just the tst I'm worried about the most
 

IceKing

Clanker
Getting my assessment centre very soon after a long drawn out medical appeal... Should I be worried about the cognitive and TST's?

TST was easy - if you can factorise maybe (2x-3)(x+2) or something like that you can do the hardest questions so it’s not that bad
 

Crow22

Swinger
Getting my assessment centre very soon after a long drawn out medical appeal... Should I be worried about the cognitive and TST's?

I think the highest score you need on the TST is something like 26, it's 55 questions and at least half of them are simple questions, using averages and rounding and things like that. I agree with Corey, the ACT is super easy too!
 
Thank you! I believe I should be ok with the medical as I did pass the RAF one however that was 5 years ago when I was 16 don't think the physical test will be too difficult. Just the tst I'm worried about the most
Just go there and give it your all, you can’t do much about your medical like but just do your best
 

Jack101098

Swinger
Hi all, I can imagine you have had a lot of similar questions but I cannot seem to find any answers. I have applied as an Avionics Tech, I am just waiting for the Army to review my medical documents.

Over 2 years ago I had 4 operations to remove an ingrown hair, I was wondering if this would get me a rejection? I have had no problems since and it does not affect me at all.

Also around the same time I was feeling a little bit down so I was prescribed the smallest dose of Sertraline (Anti-depressant) but I only took them for a few month then came off them.

I later on spoke to the doctor who said that he doesn’t believe I actually needed any tablets or treatment, i was just feeling a bit down. The doctor said he has noted this all up as I told him I was applying for the Army.

Do you guys this I will get rejected on medical grounds?

Any feedback would be hugely appreciated.
 

IceKing

Clanker
Hi all, I can imagine you have had a lot of similar questions but I cannot seem to find any answers. I have applied as an Avionics Tech, I am just waiting for the Army to review my medical documents.

Over 2 years ago I had 4 operations to remove an ingrown hair, I was wondering if this would get me a rejection? I have had no problems since and it does not affect me at all.

Also around the same time I was feeling a little bit down so I was prescribed the smallest dose of Sertraline (Anti-depressant) but I only took them for a few month then came off them.

I later on spoke to the doctor who said that he doesn’t believe I actually needed any tablets or treatment, i was just feeling a bit down. The doctor said he has noted this all up as I told him I was applying for the Army.

Do you guys this I will get rejected on medical grounds?

Any feedback would be hugely appreciated.

Just for information I was at selection a few weeks ago and the avionics tech intake for adult entry is full into March at the earliest next year, not trying to put you off or anything just making you aware in advance if you didn’t know already.
 

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