Recording your service memories for your kids, grand kids etc. Good idea or not?

I don't actually know where Tommy in question met his end mate.. but grandad was 193 MG coy 1st Hood Bn RND. He was certainly at Beaucourt tho...
My Grandad was Drake. He survived though. Died late 1950's still with some lead in him.
 
My Grandad was Drake. He survived though. Died late 1950's still with some lead in him.
Aye apparently the auld fellah had 3 x GSWs ( unsure as to where they were received ) added to Dysentery & Typhus courtesy of the trip to the Dardanelles, his 22nd birthday was spent in #14 Mudros Field hospital
 
Aye apparently the auld fellah had 3 x GSWs ( unsure as to where they were received ) added to Dysentery & Typhus courtesy of the trip to the Dardanelles, his 22nd birthday was spent in #14 Mudros Field hospital
I got my grandfathers record and after his wounding it is just a list of Aid Posts, Field Ambulances, Field Hospitals before UK. Read quite a bit about the battles that the RND was involved in.....Horrendous.
 

chrisg46

LE
Book Reviewer
I'm not entirely sure my daughter or future grandkids would approve about my exploits in german brothels.
Tell her who her real mum is? :omfg::hump:
 
I got my grandfathers record and after his wounding it is just a list of Aid Posts, Field Ambulances, Field Hospitals before UK. Read quite a bit about the battles that the RND was involved in.....Horrendous.
Grandads record is very thin too, fills one half of an a5 sheet, not a lot of info for the shite they endured. I don't know if you've read Khaki Jack, but its very informative about the campaigns the RND fought. The boxheeds were very impressed by the Division and didn't relish coming up against them
 

2ndpreimage

Old-Salt
Do it.

After a bereavement I discovered a stack of photos and I wish I knew more about them, sadly I can't ask the persons concerned.

From my (non military) crown service I have hastily printed a stack of photos and written some words on the back to explain what they were. My kids might want to know about what daddy used to do and the shenanigans he got up to. Edited highlights of course, I can tell them about the hours and hours of dross which they are free to forget. They called rose tinted specs for a reason.

edit: to add, if they hate you or the fact that you were a fascist pigdog they can just throw them in the bin or burn them
 
Do It.
What we might consider ephemeral or of little consequence is tomorrow's history and unless recorded, will die with us.
 

needlewaver

Old-Salt
I'll have to miss out certain events, such as

Everything that happened at Rintlen - in particular the events in the RAGS* room.
actually we'd better skip over much of my time in Germany, including that trip to Bavaria.

and the same for Aldershot,

and Cyrpus

and the Falklands

and America

and especially Canada (in particular events that occurred in the Park Lane Motel, above Cheeters 'night club')

a fair bit of my time at Thorney Island should be left alone

and most of the trips to Wales

but the rest is ok.


*Rinteln All Girls Society - an all ranks, 'ladies' only club, located above the NAAFI bar on the same coridoor as the temporary accommodation
I would like to point out every event was teetotal and that A**y F*****g was not sat on the RSM's wifes knee at all. If Andy Fleming, or anyone who knows Andy Fleming is reading this then I'd just like to make sure they realise that at no point have I mentioned that Andy Fleming** had anything to do with this
The three Para's in the room next to ours locked themselves in their room and took to using the window for basic bodily functions, this last part may have had nothing to do with not leaving the room due to fearing for their own safety, but more to do with personal preference.

**also it may have been spelt Flemming.

I can't remember, either way I'm not grassing him up for that one
If this is the Andy Flemming I knew in Tidworth in 2004, he carried on the movement somewhat splendidly by incurring the GOCs displeasure after the squadron Xmas do....

PM sent...
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
RIP
When I consider what a long job it has been to reconstruct, even partially, the experiences of my forebears in the world wars (and generally), I would strongly recommend anyone who has served to write down their story for the future generations. When they are young and immersed in the present or dreaming of the future they may not care much, but when you have gone and they have children of their own they will come to a stage of wishing they knew far more about you. You will be telling them of a past which was so completely different from their own lives that they will barely comprehend it; but they have been shaped by their family history and eventually will feel a need to know it, in order to work out how they are where they are. And indeed who they are.
 
Eh? 1977 it was about 4DM to the £.
Unless some bastard was ripping me off.
I think remember it being around twelve to the pound in 1973 but for some reason around early 1974, it dropped to about eight to the pound.
 
I think remember it being around twelve to the pound in 1973 but for some reason around early 1974, it dropped to about eight to the pound.
Well rgj you've been the closest to my memories of 7DM to the £.!
But as the Big Yin said ....."you get thousands of smarties for forty pounds a week !"
 
I think remember it being around twelve to the pound in 1973 but for some reason around early 1974, it dropped to about eight to the pound.
No, I checked on a site that listed all the exchange rates from about 1970. 1973 (school exchange) was 6DM. 1976 (Spearpoint) was listed at about 5DM but Forces Fixed Rate would probably have been about 6DM 'cos they were generous (behind the times) in them days.
 
Its worth him putting pen to paper to write down some of the less wanton moments of his life. Once he is gone he along with his memories will be lost, and one day the kids may like to read about their grand dad.
Couldn't agree more. My father (eventually) told me stories of his experience in WWII, but never committed them to paper and now he's gone, my own memory of what he said is neither accurate nor has the nuances of what it was actually like for someone who lived through it.
 

Wooden Wonder

War Hero
I got my father to write the memoirs of his flying career in the RAF (‘52 - ‘64) on fighters and VR((T) service in the ATC on gliders and Chipmunks (‘72 - ‘79) - and have posted several extracts on various threads on here. He was lucky to be flying when he did - he flew Harvards, Mosquitos, Hornets, Vampires, Venoms, Meteors, Pioneers, Beavers, Provosts and Tiger Moths during the piston/jet transition period and no-one was shooting at him. He got trips in (and took control of) Sunderlands, Yorks, Beverleys, Dakotas and a Lincoln. He missed out on the Beaufighter (bad weather), Spitfire (arrived on squadron just after they were replaced) and Brigand (ditto). It makes fascinating reading. My daughters knew he was a pilot but had no real idea of what he had done until they read his memoirs. It is really, really important that you service people record what you did, particularly if you lived in ‘interesting times’.
 

MrBane

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Reviews Editor
I strongly believe any soldier who has dits should record them. Nothing as fancy as a memoir in Waterstones, but something that people will have access to.

Ultimately we all live unique lives in a unique role and many of us have either hilarious, terrifying or sad stories to tell that would be worthy of a film or novel.

Why should they die with us?

Unless it's the one about that time she took my load, didn't want to swallow so she spaffed it into my Irn Bru which my mate later took a swig of when he came back in mashed.
 

Offa

War Hero
I got my father to write the memoirs of his flying career in the RAF (‘52 - ‘64) on fighters and VR((T) service in the ATC on gliders and Chipmunks (‘72 - ‘79) - and have posted several extracts on various threads on here. He was lucky to be flying when he did - he flew Harvards, Mosquitos, Hornets, Vampires, Venoms, Meteors, Pioneers, Beavers, Provosts and Tiger Moths during the piston/jet transition period and no-one was shooting at him. He got trips in (and took control of) Sunderlands, Yorks, Beverleys, Dakotas and a Lincoln. He missed out on the Beaufighter (bad weather), Spitfire (arrived on squadron just after they were replaced) and Brigand (ditto). It makes fascinating reading. My daughters knew he was a pilot but had no real idea of what he had done until they read his memoirs. It is really, really important that you service people record what you did, particularly if you lived in ‘interesting times’.
Already mentioned on this thread about recording details of father's WW2, logbook providing great start point and it was fascinating to discover. He mainly flew Beaufighters in torpedo role with 47 Sdn, and I was later to exit from their Hastings, Argosies and Beverlies. Much harder is getting info on my grandfather, regular with Devons. 1911 census has him with 2nd Bn in Malta, but come 1914 on return for France it is difficult to know if he stayed in 2Bn. I have war diaries for both 1 and 2 Devons, but ORs don't get mentioned by name. Local newspaper archives useful.
 
I strongly believe any soldier who has dits should record them. Nothing as fancy as a memoir in Waterstones, but something that people will have access to.

Ultimately we all live unique lives in a unique role and many of us have either hilarious, terrifying or sad stories to tell that would be worthy of a film or novel.

Why should they die with us?

Unless it's the one about that time she took my load, didn't want to swallow so she spaffed it into my Irn Bru which my mate later took a swig of when he came back in mashed.
That's disgusting.

Irn bru FFS. Bleurgh
 
When I consider what a long job it has been to reconstruct, even partially, the experiences of my forebears in the world wars (and generally), I would strongly recommend anyone who has served to write down their story for the future generations. When they are young and immersed in the present or dreaming of the future they may not care much, but when you have gone and they have children of their own they will come to a stage of wishing they knew far more about you. You will be telling them of a past which was so completely different from their own lives that they will barely comprehend it; but they have been shaped by their family history and eventually will feel a need to know it, in order to work out how they are where they are. And indeed who they are.
Fully agree and thank you for encouraging me previously to write down my own recollections. They aren't so much for the here and now, nor self-aggrandisement whilst living, but for those left who wished they had asked whilst they could, but didn't. Something I wish I'd done with members of my family, leaving only the benefit of hindsight.
 

Yokel

LE
I wish I knew more of my Grandfather's experience in the RN during WWII. He died when I was eight. Maybe Dad could make notes on his Cold War service in the RN? If nothing else it would stop him from changing his dits every time.
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
Oh I don't know. The story of how my dad as a fresh out of the box NIG lost his virginity to a 50 year old german brass was quite amusing to me.
She offered him a liquorice sweet half way though him giving her the good news!
Liquoriice? was he REME and needed sustaining?
 

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