Recording your service memories for your kids, grand kids etc. Good idea or not?

Looking forward to Vol 1 of the epic trilogy "I Threw My Hat Into The Ring" by @Bravo_Bravo
Well as long as you're not bothered about what a bloke you've never met, in a capbadge youve never served under, may or may not have done that's fine.

#triggered
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Well as long as you're not bothered about what a bloke you've never met, in a capbadge youve never served under, may or may not have done that's fine.

#triggered
As you're not bothered about his post.
At all.
Not one little bit.

Triggered is the word. :-D

 
Well as long as you're not bothered about what a bloke you've never met, in a capbadge youve never served under, may or may not have done that's fine.

#triggered
Make sure I get the hardback editions.

And don't forget to sign them "...to my very good friend, dogmeat of Arrse".
 
I have recently managed to write about my father's war from his pilot's logbook, squadron records from National Archives, other WW2 sources including memoirs, campaign accounts and internet, some of which actually gave details of Luftwaffe sorties enabling the ID of German pilots who shot down individuals in father's squadron. There is an amazing amount of detail available, but I wish I had asked him more questions.
Was it a hard slog finding it? My family know next to nothing about my Great Uncle's service (Lancaster crew). I found out a bit more just through Google but would love a crack at getting some more detail.
 
Make sure I get the hardback editions.

And don't forget to sign them"...to my very good friend, dogmeat of Arrse".
I'll swap it for "The Dogshit Guide To Common Office 365 Problems" if that's ok, yah?
 
As you're not bothered about his post.
At all.
Not one little bit.

Triggered is the word. :-D

Clippety Klop...
The irony bypass surgery has been a complete success I note.
 
I'll have to miss out certain events, such as

Everything that happened at Rintlen - in particular the events in the RAGS* room.
actually we'd better skip over much of my time in Germany, including that trip to Bavaria.

and the same for Aldershot,

and Cyrpus

and the Falklands

and America

and especially Canada (in particular events that occurred in the Park Lane Motel, above Cheeters 'night club')

a fair bit of my time at Thorney Island should be left alone

and most of the trips to Wales

but the rest is ok.


*Rinteln All Girls Society - an all ranks, 'ladies' only club, located above the NAAFI bar on the same coridoor as the temporary accommodation
I would like to point out every event was teetotal and that A**y F*****g was not sat on the RSM's wifes knee at all. If Andy Fleming, or anyone who knows Andy Fleming is reading this then I'd just like to make sure they realise that at no point have I mentioned that Andy Fleming** had anything to do with this
The three Para's in the room next to ours locked themselves in their room and took to using the window for basic bodily functions, this last part may have had nothing to do with not leaving the room due to fearing for their own safety, but more to do with personal preference.

**also it may have been spelt Flemming.

I can't remember, either way I'm not grassing him up for that one
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
I was fortunate enough to be invited to record my military experiences for the Imperial War Museum "Oral History" archives last year. This took the form of a series of face to face interviews with an IWM historian over several months, eventually running to about 16 hours of recordings (thirty years of stagging on, drinking and w*nking spanners takes a while to talk about). I heartily recommend the process - I found it to be extremely cathartic , bringing to light many memories I'd buried and allowing me to re-assess and understand myself better both then and now, and make peace with a few old skeletons I didn't even realize were still bothering me. Not to mention the opportunity to recall all the good times, of which there were many more than I thought. The skill of the interviewer was paramount in this, he got me to open me up like an oyster (fnarr), and dredge up things I'd not thought about for decades

The IWM will eventually provide me with a digital recording of the interviews, which I'm planning to stick in a drawer and label "To be listened to when I'm dead and gone" for my kids.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
That's original.
Though for whom the defence is I don't know.


As the third most triggered oke om the site, you speak of irony in relation to your posts...
:-D
Well as long as you're not bothered, dear.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
I have recently managed to write about my father's war from his pilot's logbook, squadron records from National Archives, other WW2 sources including memoirs, campaign accounts and internet, some of which actually gave details of Luftwaffe sorties enabling the ID of German pilots who shot down individuals in father's squadron. There is an amazing amount of detail available, but I wish I had asked him more questions.
We actually have a letter written by the night fighter pilot who shot down my Grand dads aircraft courtesy of a researcher at work. Retired Dentist from Munich (still doing extractions I imagine) and awful hand writing.
 
Anyway, I'll stop replying to the tedious trolling now in the hope that the crayonning will stop.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
In November 76 when I joined the Regt, now this is confusing.... I could have sworen that I was paid 7 DM to the £.
Back on thread...Yes you should. My Grandfather was a WW1 veteran. (In WW2 he was ARP )
He died October 76, two months into my service. As a child I sort of remember him telling me some stories, but nothing I could remember to write about.
My Father who's also gone now, really regretted not getting his Dad to sit down and record his memory's.
 
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Well personally, I wish my mums old fellah had written his war stories down ( RND , from Antwerp to the final whistle via Gallipoli ) but as with so many of his generation it was his and his alone to deal with. The only time time he brought it up was when he was in his cups, and would only ever talk about the loss of his best mate Tommy and then only to talk about he closeness they shared and how sad he still was over the loss. He eventually shuffled off this mortal coil in 1967 ( was about 4 ) but no one knows anything of his experiences. I think old timers have a duty to make sure the next generations know. Theres no history quite as interesting as hearing it from those who were there
My Grandfather too, although he never made the final whistle as he got wounded (shot 6 times) at Beaucourt. Funny though...His name was Tommy .
 
I think it’s a good thing for a record to be made as it can explain where, when, why, and how items that were acquired during service have significance and are still held onto rather than binned or sold. In this household there are items that date back to the Opium wars that my great grandfather found, things from grandfather in ww1, and dad from ww2 that I have no idea about, but hold onto them because they meant something. Adding a story to a plain object can turn something that sits in a drawer to part of interesting family history for descendants down the line.
 
My Grandfather too, although he never made the final whistle as he got wounded (shot 6 times) at Beaucourt. Funny though...His name was Tommy .
I don't actually know where Tommy in question met his end mate.. but grandad was 193 MG coy 1st Hood Bn RND. He was certainly at Beaucourt tho...
 

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