Recording your service memories for your kids, grand kids etc. Good idea or not?

#1
Folks,
I have suggested to my dad that it may be a good idea for him to put some of his memories - both good and bad, from his time in the army, down on to paper.
Something for his grandchildren to read in the future kinda thing.
A lot of my own grandad's history, I never found out until after his death, because he didn't like to talk to us kids about the war.
My dad is particularly close to my eldest son - as they share a common interest in model making. Even though my dad has now retired to Spain, he keeps in regular touch with his grandchildren via skype and regular visits.
So, whilst my dad's - or even my own experiences as a STAB may not be the stuff of 'boys own' novels, I'd like to see my dad record things for my kids.
What do others think?
 
#4
I'm not entirely sure my daughter or future grandkids would approve about my exploits in german brothels.
Oh I don't know. The story of how my dad as a fresh out of the box NIG lost his virginity to a 50 year old german brass was quite amusing to me.
She offered him a liquorice sweet half way though him giving her the good news!
 
#5
Its worth him putting pen to paper to write down some of the less wanton moments of his life. Once he is gone he along with his memories will be lost, and one day the kids may like to read about their grand dad.
 
#8
I may well be getting some stories mixed up, but I dimly recall he ended up doing a deal with one of the chefs to spit roast one of the girls at a reduced rate.

Tight bastard. I'll have to embellesh that in the memoirs.

You wouldn't get that in Adultwork.
 
#10
I may well be getting some stories mixed up, but I dimly recall he ended up doing a deal with one of the chefs to spit roast one of the girls at a reduced rate.

Tight bastard. I'll have to embellesh that in the memoirs.

You wouldn't get that in Adultwork.
You could always embellish it by stating that he got two brasses for the price of one!
 
#11
I may well be getting some stories mixed up, but I dimly recall he ended up doing a deal with one of the chefs to spit roast one of the girls at a reduced rate.

Tight bastard. I'll have to embellesh that in the memoirs.
Yes but don't forget that the ending is that the girl backed out of the deal when she saw the gungy state of the chef.
 
#14
On the basis of the above and all the good dits being about manky old brasses not shitty transit accom and cnuts trying to kill you, I'd not bother and leave em to Enid Blighton
 
#15
Folks,
I have suggested to my dad that it may be a good idea for him to put some of his memories - both good and bad, from his time in the army, down on to paper.
Something for his grandchildren to read in the future kinda thing.
A lot of my own grandad's history, I never found out until after his death, because he didn't like to talk to us kids about the war.
My dad is particularly close to my eldest son - as they share a common interest in model making. Even though my dad has now retired to Spain, he keeps in regular touch with his grandchildren via skype and regular visits.
So, whilst my dad's - or even my own experiences as a STAB may not be the stuff of 'boys own' novels, I'd like to see my dad record things for my kids.
What do others think?
Well personally, I wish my mums old fellah had written his war stories down ( RND , from Antwerp to the final whistle via Gallipoli ) but as with so many of his generation it was his and his alone to deal with. The only time time he brought it up was when he was in his cups, and would only ever talk about the loss of his best mate Tommy and then only to talk about he closeness they shared and how sad he still was over the loss. He eventually shuffled off this mortal coil in 1967 ( was about 4 ) but no one knows anything of his experiences. I think old timers have a duty to make sure the next generations know. Theres no history quite as interesting as hearing it from those who were there
 
#16
Well personally, I wish my mums old fellah had written his war stories down ( RND , from Antwerp to the final whistle via Gallipoli ) but as with so many of his generation it was his and his alone to deal with. The only time time he brought it up was when he was in his cups, and would only ever talk about the loss of his best mate Tommy and then only to talk about he closeness they shared and how sad he still was over the loss. He eventually shuffled off this mortal coil in 1967 ( was about 4 ) but no one knows anything of his experiences. I think old timers have a duty to make sure the next generations know. Theres no history quite as interesting as hearing it from those who were there
Couldn't agree more mate.
 
#17
I have recently managed to write about my father's war from his pilot's logbook, squadron records from National Archives, other WW2 sources including memoirs, campaign accounts and internet, some of which actually gave details of Luftwaffe sorties enabling the ID of German pilots who shot down individuals in father's squadron. There is an amazing amount of detail available, but I wish I had asked him more questions.
 
#18
Well personally, I wish my mums old fellah had written his war stories down ( RND , from Antwerp to the final whistle via Gallipoli ) but as with so many of his generation it was his and his alone to deal with. The only time time he brought it up was when he was in his cups, and would only ever talk about the loss of his best mate Tommy and then only to talk about he closeness they shared and how sad he still was over the loss. He eventually shuffled off this mortal coil in 1967 ( was about 4 ) but no one knows anything of his experiences. I think old timers have a duty to make sure the next generations know. Theres no history quite as interesting as hearing it from those who were there
The FiL used to tell me his tales of service in the Royal Navy in WW2. He served on a couple of ships, one being HMS Belfast tied up in London for tourists to wander aboard nowadays. Being a London boy he used to go along to visit the old girl whenever he was in town. He would take great delight in contradicting the tourist guides and their descriptions and explanations of how things were - most times he would end up taking over as the guide. He was the first non-officer officially ashore in Singapore as he had to collect some films for his ship - he told me they kept the crews onboard ship because if they had seen the state of some of the population and Changi prisoners they would have lynched the Jap's. After Singapore they took the ships off to Oz for the crews to decompress and he ended up going 'walkabout' with a couple of mates for a month on leave.....which is a whole different tale.
 

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