Reasons why mobile phones and operations dont mix

#2
Security isn't a dirty word Blackadder!
 
#3
General Dudayev?

Death and legacy
President Dudayev was killed on the April 21, 1996, by two laser-guided missiles when he was using a satellite phone, after his location was detected by a Russian reconnaissance aircraft, which intercepted his phone call. Despite America's ban on assassinations, there is a conspiracy theory that suspects the NSA was involved in the assassination by providing one of their SIGINT satellites to assist in the triangulation.[3] At the time Dudayev was reportedly talking to a liberal deputy of the Duma in Moscow, reportedly Konstantin Borovoy. Additional aircraft were dispatched (a Su-24MR and a Su-25) to locate Dudayev and fire a guided missile. Exact details of this operation were never released by the Russian government. However, it is known that Russian reconnaissance planes in the area had been monitoring satellite communications for quite some time trying to match Dudayev's voice signature to the existing samples of his speech. It was also claimed Dudayev's was murdered by a combination of a rocket attack and a booby trap.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dzhokhar_Dudaev
 
#4
classic what are the chances that the first thing he gets when he gets home is a slap around the head from his mum and a bar of soap in the mouth.
 
#6
Interesting OPSEC drills.

Lucky he didn't call inadvertently during the rape and pillage part.
 
#10
Sven said:
So should mobiles be allowed on Ops. Surely it buggars opsec and persec right up?
Your up late doing your armchair judging arent you Sven, nothing else to do I take it, I suppose you might of got a job as a night security guard though, thats why your up so late or are you still unemployable.

If you had been on a current operational tour you would know the UK stance on mobile phones in operational theatres wouldnt you :roll:
 
#11
The_IRON said:
Sven said:
So should mobiles be allowed on Ops. Surely it buggars opsec and persec right up?
Your up late doing your armchair judging arent you Sven, nothing else to do I take it, I suppose you might of got a job as a night security guard though, thats why your up so late or are you still unemployable.

If you had been on a current operational tour you would know the UK stance on mobile phones in operational theatres wouldnt you :roll:
If You were able to read properly You would see that I didn't mention UK policy at all, and why should I - this was a story about US soldiers slackness.

If I were to go on an operational tour now I would be the first narcoleptic to have done so. I can just imagine it, having a hallucination (as I am want to do occasionally) about Terry in some FOB - wouldn't half put the wind up the reat of the team :roll:
 
#12
The counter to that is Medal of Honor awardee Lt Michael Murphy, who, when the primary commo system failed, used his 'phone to call for aid, thus saving the life of his colleague.

http://www.navytimes.com/news/2007/10/navy_seal_moh_071011w/

The team was taking heavy fire in the close-quarters battle as Taliban fighters continued to close in, firing weapons and rocket-propelled grenades. At one point, Murphy took his mobile phone and “walked to open ground. He walked until he was more or less in the center, gunfire all around him, and he sat on a small rock and began punching in the numbers to HQ,” according to Luttrell, the surviving SEAL, who wrote a book called “Lone Survivor.”

“I could hear him talking,” Luttrell wrote. “My men are taking heavy fire ... we’re getting picked apart. My guys are dying out here ... we need help.

“And right then Mikey took a bullet straight in the back. I saw the blood spurt from his chest. He slumped forward, dropping his phone and his rifle. But then he braced himself, grabbed them both, sat upright again, and once more put the phone to his ear.”

Then, Luttrell heard Murphy say, “Roger that, sir. Thank you.” The lieutenant continued to train fire on the enemy fighters.
Granted, I believe it was a satellite 'phone, not a GSM, but the principle is valid. You can never have too many forms of communication. Personally, I was very pleased when I discovered I had a signal in Mosul, it meant no waiting in line at the queues for the pay 'phones.

NTM
 
#13
California_Tanker said:
The counter to that is Medal of Honor awardee Lt Michael Murphy, who, when the primary commo system failed, used his 'phone to call for aid, thus saving the life of his colleague.

http://www.navytimes.com/news/2007/10/navy_seal_moh_071011w/

The team was taking heavy fire in the close-quarters battle as Taliban fighters continued to close in, firing weapons and rocket-propelled grenades. At one point, Murphy took his mobile phone and “walked to open ground. He walked until he was more or less in the center, gunfire all around him, and he sat on a small rock and began punching in the numbers to HQ,” according to Luttrell, the surviving SEAL, who wrote a book called “Lone Survivor.”

“I could hear him talking,” Luttrell wrote. “My men are taking heavy fire ... we’re getting picked apart. My guys are dying out here ... we need help.

“And right then Mikey took a bullet straight in the back. I saw the blood spurt from his chest. He slumped forward, dropping his phone and his rifle. But then he braced himself, grabbed them both, sat upright again, and once more put the phone to his ear.”

Then, Luttrell heard Murphy say, “Roger that, sir. Thank you.” The lieutenant continued to train fire on the enemy fighters.
Granted, I believe it was a satellite 'phone, not a GSM, but the principle is valid. You can never have too many forms of communication. Personally, I was very pleased when I discovered I had a signal in Mosul, it meant no waiting in line at the queues for the pay 'phones.

NTM
Wasn't there something about people getting the numbers dialed by soldiers out there and then phoning up their loved ones and telling them their soldier had been killed? I think I'd rather stand in line than have that happen
 
#14
I suspect our soldier has had conversations with his First Sergeant, CO and Sergeant-Major. Unpleasant conversations.
 
#15
Virgil said:
I suspect our soldier has had conversations with his First Sergeant, CO and Sergeant-Major. Unpleasant conversations.
Said soldier should have a long and deep conversation with his conscience.
 
#16
It is normal for the younger generationm to have a phone in their hands at all times, I expect "texting" a loved one when your overseas and feeling a little down could help.

My grandparents were separated for years in World war II, my gran wouldn't know if my granfather was alive or dead for weeks on end. Letters could take a long time to be delivered and now troops have mobile coverage while in action.

When I were a lad . . . .this were all fields!

:)
 
#17
Sven said:
The_IRON said:
Sven said:
So should mobiles be allowed on Ops. Surely it buggars opsec and persec right up?
Your up late doing your armchair judging arent you Sven, nothing else to do I take it, I suppose you might of got a job as a night security guard though, thats why your up so late or are you still unemployable.

If you had been on a current operational tour you would know the UK stance on mobile phones in operational theatres wouldnt you :roll:
If You were able to read properly You would see that I didn't mention UK policy at all, and why should I - this was a story about US soldiers slackness.

If I were to go on an operational tour now I would be the first narcoleptic to have done so. I can just imagine it, having a hallucination (as I am want to do occasionally) about Terry in some FOB - wouldn't half put the wind up the reat of the team :roll:
Your question was:
So should mobiles be allowed on Ops. Surely it buggars opsec and persec right up

And as I pointed out if you werent such a retarded lazy fcuktard who knew what you was on about you would know the stance of the hierachy on mobile phones on different operational theatres. Go and start selling the big issue and stop sitting in your armchair at stupid o'clock in the morning with your bone political views and arguements.
 
#18
The_IRON said:
Sven said:
The_IRON said:
Sven said:
So should mobiles be allowed on Ops. Surely it buggars opsec and persec right up?
Your up late doing your armchair judging arent you Sven, nothing else to do I take it, I suppose you might of got a job as a night security guard though, thats why your up so late or are you still unemployable.

If you had been on a current operational tour you would know the UK stance on mobile phones in operational theatres wouldnt you :roll:
If You were able to read properly You would see that I didn't mention UK policy at all, and why should I - this was a story about US soldiers slackness.

If I were to go on an operational tour now I would be the first narcoleptic to have done so. I can just imagine it, having a hallucination (as I am want to do occasionally) about Terry in some FOB - wouldn't half put the wind up the reat of the team :roll:
Your question was:
So should mobiles be allowed on Ops. Surely it buggars opsec and persec right up

And as I pointed out if you werent such a retarded lazy fcuktard who knew what you was on about you would know the stance of the hierachy on mobile phones on different operational theatres. Go and start selling the big issue and stop sitting in your armchair at stupid o'clock in the morning with your bone political views and arguements.
So You are saying that the US soldier was disobeying direct orders by having the mobile in theatre? Care to provide some kind of proof of that?
 
#19
I am aware of no such prohibition. It would be highly unpopular.

The obvious solution is to make sure they have the keypad lock set.

NTM
 

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