Reasons why mobile phones and operations dont mix

Discussion in 'Current Affairs, News and Analysis' started by Hantslad, May 8, 2008.

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  1. Security isn't a dirty word Blackadder!
     
  2. General Dudayev?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dzhokhar_Dudaev
     
  3. classic what are the chances that the first thing he gets when he gets home is a slap around the head from his mum and a bar of soap in the mouth.
     
  4. I wonder what the call cost?
     
  5. Interesting OPSEC drills.

    Lucky he didn't call inadvertently during the rape and pillage part.
     
  6. I know! Couple of minutes Afghan to US, must have cost loads!
     
  7. So should mobiles be allowed on Ops. Surely it buggars opsec and persec right up?
     
  8. Your up late doing your armchair judging arent you Sven, nothing else to do I take it, I suppose you might of got a job as a night security guard though, thats why your up so late or are you still unemployable.

    If you had been on a current operational tour you would know the UK stance on mobile phones in operational theatres wouldnt you :roll:
     
  9. If You were able to read properly You would see that I didn't mention UK policy at all, and why should I - this was a story about US soldiers slackness.

    If I were to go on an operational tour now I would be the first narcoleptic to have done so. I can just imagine it, having a hallucination (as I am want to do occasionally) about Terry in some FOB - wouldn't half put the wind up the reat of the team :roll:
     
  10. The counter to that is Medal of Honor awardee Lt Michael Murphy, who, when the primary commo system failed, used his 'phone to call for aid, thus saving the life of his colleague.

    http://www.navytimes.com/news/2007/10/navy_seal_moh_071011w/

    Granted, I believe it was a satellite 'phone, not a GSM, but the principle is valid. You can never have too many forms of communication. Personally, I was very pleased when I discovered I had a signal in Mosul, it meant no waiting in line at the queues for the pay 'phones.

    NTM
     
  11. Wasn't there something about people getting the numbers dialed by soldiers out there and then phoning up their loved ones and telling them their soldier had been killed? I think I'd rather stand in line than have that happen
     
  12. I suspect our soldier has had conversations with his First Sergeant, CO and Sergeant-Major. Unpleasant conversations.
     
  13. Said soldier should have a long and deep conversation with his conscience.