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Really Bad Gel

Be warned.
I bought this stuff about two weeks ago.
Can't remember which supermarket, but I think it was Asda.
It is so rank, that SWMBO chucked it down the toilet, which made that toilet unusable for the crest of the day.
The smell is almost impossible to describe, but think of really badly made alcohol ( I didn't think such a thing was possible before this)
The make is SANXI DERM
Made in the USA.

Avoid like the plague.


Unless of course, the bad smell was deliberately added to test our sense of smell as a COVID-19 precaution.
But I doubt it.



Screenshot_20201203-221100_Gallery.jpg
 
Be warned.
I bought this stuff about two weeks ago.
Can't remember which supermarket, but I think it was Asda.
It is so rank, that SWMBO chucked it down the toilet, which made that toilet unusable for the crest of the day.
The smell is almost impossible to describe, but think of really badly made alcohol ( I didn't think such a thing was possible before this)
The make is SANXI DERM
Made in the USA.

Avoid like the plague.


Unless of course, the bad smell was deliberately added to test our sense of smell as a COVID-19 precaution.
But I doubt it.



View attachment 525903
72% booze? The Russians are already developing a cocktail recipe.

It might actually be effective against COVID, unlike many anti-bacterial handgels that will do absolutely **** all against a virus. Soap is much more effective than either option.
 
72% booze? The Russians are already developing a cocktail recipe.

It might actually be effective against COVID, unlike many anti-bacterial handgels that will do absolutely **** all against a virus. Soap is much more effective than either option.

Alcohol hand gels are active against viruses.
 
Alcohol hand gels are active against viruses.
Above around 70% ABV yes. Most anti-bacterial hand gels are mostly water with a bit of ethanol and a broad spectrum antibiotic like triclosan.

Soap is still more effective than either option.
 
72% booze? The Russians are already developing a cocktail recipe.

It might actually be effective against COVID, unlike many anti-bacterial handgels that will do absolutely **** all against a virus. Soap is much more effective than either option.
Alcohol hand gels are active against viruses.
But the label says it "kills 99.99% of most bacteria"

51% is classed as most bacteria. So the other 49%?
 
I agree that a good wash with plenty of soap and water is best, but it's handy to carry alcohol based gel when out and about.

Mind you, SWIMBO carries it to an extreme. She santises her hands after making the 20 metre trek from back door to inside our car.
 
But the label says it "kills 99.99% of most bacteria"

51% is classed as most bacteria. So the other 49%?
Bacteria are not viruses. Totally different things.

An anti bacterial handgel might well kill 99% of bacteria but won't touch viruses. Antibiotics don't work on viruses, just as antifungals tend not to work on bacteria.

That 'most' bacteria refers to a common sample. If you are testing said handgel on resistant bacteria it might kill 5%.
 
it's handy to carry alcohol based gel when out and about.
I agree. The issue is people thinking all handgel is created equal. Some are designed to be antibacterial which means they are mostly water with a bit of ethanol / isopropanol and a broad spectrum antibiotic. Check the ingredients list, unless ethanol is listed first then it's likely to be useless as an anti-viral option.

Most anti-bacterials work by actually killing bacterial cells ie. disrupting cell function. That's the equivalent of spotting some very carefully designed machinery and chucking a spanner in. Simple solution fucks complex machinery.

Viruses are much more simple and so require brute force methods. Alcohol hand gels aren't doing anything other than dissolving the viral lipid coat and then RNA. Washing your hands in petrol / meths / AVGAS would have the same effect. Not sure about diesel, maybe too high a viscosity to be useful.
 
Last edited:
Bacteria are not viruses. Totally different things.

An anti bacterial handgel might well kill 99% of bacteria but won't touch viruses. Antibiotics don't work on viruses, just as antifungals tend not to work on bacteria.

That 'most' bacteria refers to a common sample. If you are testing said handgel on resistant bacteria it might kill 5%.
I know all that, just was pointing out how badly worded the labelling was. Probably some Chinese knock-off. In fact they even spell "moisturise" correctly considering it's an American import.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
I agree that a good wash with plenty of soap and water is best, but it's handy to carry alcohol based gel when out and about.

Mind you, SWIMBO carries it to an extreme. She santises her hands after making the 20 metre trek from back door to inside our car.
That's insanity.



I'll get me gloves.
 
I agree. The issue is people thinking all handgel is created equal. Some are designed to be antibacterial which means they are mostly water with a bit of ethanol / isopropanol and a broad spectrum antibiotic. Check the ingredients list, unless ethanol is listed first then it's likely to be useless as an anti-viral option.
The WHO issued guidelines back in April based on research done at the German Institute of Hygiene and Environmental Medicine. To be effective against COVID, a sanitiser needs to be more than 80% ethanol or 75% isopropyl alcohol. At that strength, alcohol will deactivate an envelopes virus in 30 seconds. At concentrations as low as 43%, it has some effect. Below that, none.

The US Centre for Disease Control found that gels are far less effective than liquid alcohol. They take too long to act; their recommendation is that gels should not be used in healthcare situations.

Depending on where they are used and how they are sold, some hand sanitiser are regulated as medicines and labelled as such. Others are cosmetics or consumer goods; it depends on the claim made on the label.

I wouldn’t trust the OPs sanitiser as a Covid preventative. There’s no indication it has been through any form of proper testing or certification that it actually contains what it says on the bottle. The problem with these cheap shit cleansers is that they give a false sense of security; people use an ineffective gel instead of washing properly with soap and water.

How do I know this. No Dr Google. We spent good money on making a properly listed sanitiser for the Australian market. It works out at about $16 cost for a 500ml bottle. We’ve been left with a lot of stock because the market is flooded with garbage gels that sell for a couple of dollars and do **** all.
 
Last edited:
The really surprising thing?

It's 75p cheaper in Waitrose than Asda.
 
Be warned.
I bought this stuff about two weeks ago.
Can't remember which supermarket, but I think it was Asda.
It is so rank, that SWMBO chucked it down the toilet, which made that toilet unusable for the crest of the day.
The smell is almost impossible to describe, but think of really badly made alcohol ( I didn't think such a thing was possible before this)
The make is SANXI DERM
Made in the USA.

Avoid like the plague.


Unless of course, the bad smell was deliberately added to test our sense of smell as a COVID-19 precaution.
But I doubt it.



View attachment 525903
FFS, I saw the headline and thought it was going to be about naughty posh gels, hopefully with photographs!
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Many of the good hospital gels have an agent specifically in it that tastes foul to stop patients drinking it.

Were you actually have a quick swig?
 
Many of the good hospital gels have an agent specifically in it that tastes foul to stop patients drinking it.
Is there a version for Covid patients? One of the symptoms is the ability to drink hospital anti-virus gel.
 

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