Realigning the British Army after Ukraine

Yokel

LE
Will be interesting to see how this goes.

I suspect CGS knows how much people and material 3 Div could currently put into the field and by when. Not much, not very quickly.

The 'global engagement' crap seems to be on the back burner, which is sensible. The US folks I spoke to always looked a bit puzzled we were touring around the South China Sea. First and foremost, they expect us to hold our own in Europe.

It is going to take several years to build up the capability required to meet CGS' aim, and while pace is definitely needed I'd rather see a well thought out and planned set of activities than rigging up a spreadsheet with red amber green KPIs and an Op name.

Last year's defence policy was based on the Euro Atlantic first and foremost. Maybe I be allowed to quote myself?

From last year after the defence review:

Paragraph 17 of the overview

The UK is a European country with global interests, as an open economy and a maritime trading nation with a large diaspora. Our future prosperity will be enhanced by deepening our economic connections with dynamic parts of the world such as the Indo-Pacific, Africa and the Gulf, as well as trade with Europe. The precondition for Global Britain is the safety of our citizens at home and the security of the Euro-Atlantic region, where the bulk of the UK’s security focus will remain.

Paragraph 32 iii

NATO will remain the foundation of collective security in our home region of the Euro-Atlantic, where Russia remains the most acute threat to our security.

On the same page:

Page 6

We will continue to be the leading European Ally within NATO, bolstering the Alliance by tackling threats jointly and committing our resources to collective security in the Euro-Atlantic region.

Page 16

The precondition for Global Britain is the safety of our citizens at home and the security of the Euro-Atlantic region, where the bulk of the UK’s security focus will remain.

Page 18

NATO will remain the foundation of collective security in our home region of the Euro-Atlantic, where Russia remains the most acute threat to our security.

Page 26

The Euro-Atlantic region will remain critical to the UK’s security and prosperity; partnerships beyond the immediate European neighbourhood will also remain important. Russia will remain the most acute direct threat to the UK, and the US will continue to ask more from its allies in Europe in sharing the burden of collective security.

Page 60

Our aim is to be well-placed to take advantage of emerging markets, shifts in the global economy and global progress in S&T, and to shoulder our share of the burden in providing for stability and security at the global level as well as in the Euro-Atlantic area. This will guide the way we prioritise our diplomatic efforts, including in our tilt to the Indo-Pacific.

Page 60

The UK will be the greatest single European contributor to the security of the Euro-Atlantic area to 2030.

Page 69

We will tailor our presence and support according to the country and region, continuing to focus our security efforts primarily on the Euro-Atlantic region and providing support in Africa – in particular in East Africa and to important partners in West Africa such as Nigeria – and in the Middle East.

Page 71

The Royal Navy will remain active in the UK’s territorial sea and Exclusive Economic Zone, including by investing in new capabilities to protect undersea CNI. The Royal Air Force (RAF) will continue to provide a 24-hour quick reaction alert force to defend UK airspace and our new Poseidon maritime patrol aircraft will patrol the North Atlantic from their base at RAF Lossiemouth in Scotland.

Page 71

...a permanent maritime presence in the Atlantic and Caribbean...

Page 71

NATO is the foundation of collective security in the Euro-Atlantic area, where our commitment to Article 5 of the North Atlantic Treaty remains our most powerful deterrent. In an era of rapid developments in technology and doctrine, the Alliance must be equipped to deal with the full range of possible threats. These include long-range precision strike weapons, cyber weapons and weapons aimed at degrading spacebased infrastructure. They also include malign activity intended to test the boundary between peace and war, and our resolve in response. Russia is the most acute threat in the region and we will work with NATO Allies to ensure a united Western response, combining military, intelligence and diplomatic efforts.

Page 72

Operating across the Euro-Atlantic region, and with a focus on the northern and southern flanks of Europe, we will support collective security from the Black Sea to the High North, in the Baltics, the Balkans and the Mediterranean....

Page 72

In the Euro-Atlantic, the UK will be one of only two NATO Allies to bring to bear nuclear, offensive cyber, precision strike weapons and fifth-generation strike aircraft. We will also contribute to missile defence, to space awareness and resilience (including through a new Space Command) and to CBRN resilience. A new generation of warships will support our historic role in keeping the North Atlantic open. Our highly mobile airborne and amphibious forces will be able to reinforce Allies at short notice.

Page 74

This will involve deepening our security relationships in the wider Euro-Atlantic area, Africa and the Middle East, and with a greater emphasis on the Indo-Pacific. Through our support to others in capacity-building, we will: develop a shared understanding of the security threats we face, including through increased information-sharing; undertake joint education, training and exercises; and provide assistance and expertise in developing policy, legislation and regulatory frameworks.

Page 77

Since 1962, the UK has declared our nuclear capability to the defence of the Alliance. We will continue to do so, safeguarding European and Euro-Atlantic security. We will work with Allies to ensure that NATO’s nuclear deterrent capabilities remain safe, secure and effective, adapt to emerging challenges including the growing and diversifying nuclear threats that the Alliance may face, and contribute to the indivisible security of the Alliance.

From another page of the same thread:

NATO Foreign Ministers discuss Russia - UK Defence Journal

“While our relationship with Russia remains very difficult, our meeting today demonstrates strong agreement among Allies and with our partners. Despite years of pressure and efforts to engage in a meaningful dialogue, Russia has increased its pattern of repressive behaviour at home and aggressive behaviour abroad. In Russia, we still see violent oppression of political dissent.

And we call for the immediate release of Alexei Navalny and other peaceful demonstrators who have been arrested. Abroad, Russia undermines and destabilizes its neighbours, including Ukraine, Georgia, and the Republic of Moldova. It supports the crackdown on Belarus, and tries to interfere in the Western Balkans region.

Russia continues its wide-ranging military build-up. From the Baltic to the Black Sea. In the Middle East and North Africa. And from the Mediterranean to the Arctic. Allies have called out Russia’s disinformation and propaganda.”


Yet another page:

Professor Dr Admiral PhotEx Dada is unlikely to agree with this article from the Proceedings of the US Naval Institute: Delivering Global Britain - A Naval Perspective

The arrival of Admiral Tony Radakin as First Sea Lord and Chief of Naval Staff in 2019 saw the release of a new vision for the Royal Navy that focuses on five main parts: (1) greater investment in the North Atlantic for the security of the U.K.’s nuclear deterrent; (2) delivery of the U.K.’s carrier strike capability; (3) delivery of the future commando force; (4) forward presence; and (5) increased use of technology and innovation. The North Atlantic is the main arterial lifeline to the United Kingdom, as well as the hiding place for its nuclear deterrent, and therefore will always be of the highest importance to the Royal Navy.

Carriers

In support of all five globally deployed OPVs and HMS Montrose in the Gulf, the First Sea Lord’s plan is to operate at least one carrier strike group (CSG) out of the United Kingdom. This will surge as required to deliver the higher-level capabilities that may be needed anywhere in the world, but basing in the United Kingdom underlines its commitment to NATO and the Atlantic.

Amphibious capabilities

In addition to the carrier strike group, future commando force will deliver a littoral strike capability. This is likely to be delivered through two littoral response groups (LRGs). The first will be based out of the United Kingdom to support the Northern Flank and European interests.....
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
I'm not sure that spending £36k to get 5 years service in the reserves is a good deal for defence.
Most of the student loan money is never paid back, at least this way the treasury would see some return
 
Why hadn’t they been looking after their equipment?
I have some sympathy there. A lot of it comes down to what their vehicle types are, spares availability and even if they are allowed to take them out for a spin every now and again.
When I got posted back to the UK in 95 I ended up in a troop of 13 Leyland Crusaders. On a (very) good day only 3 of these would be working. On an average day, 2.
The others were being stripped for spares. Thankfully we were the first to get the Seddon low loaders (we did the trials for these too) and our availability went through the roof.
My guess is that whichever unit it was, it may not be a lack of willingness to keep the vehicles in a ready condition, more that they simply couldn't.
Or that they really were crap!
 
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Bad to form to quote oneself but Wallace has just aired the idea that these onerous tasks will be transferred to the Reserve….

Does he know that the reservists doing those roles were busy doing them in their civvy jobs already? I suspect not...

Proper bold thinking would be something along the lines of transferring all the heavy roles to the reserves...
 

Majorpain

War Hero
I have some sympathy there. A lot of it comes down to what their vehicle types are, spares availability and even if they are allowed to take them out for a spin every now and again.
When I got posted back to the UK in 95 I ended up in a troop of 13 Leyland Crusaders. On a (very) good day only 3 of these would be working. On an average day, 2.
The others were being stripped for spares. Thankfully we were the first to get the Seddon low loaders (we did the trials for these too) and our availability went through the roof.
My guess is that whichever unit it was, it may not be a lack of willingness to keep the vehicles in a ready condition, more that they simply couldn't.
Or that they really were crap!
Unit was not a priority for spares, and vehicles are old and tired in desperate need of the refurb they are getting over next few years. Just another example of a short term money saving coming back to bite in the long run, something that unsurprisingly made its way into Defence Sec's Rusi speech as he is having to deal with the consequences.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
Unit was not a priority for spares, and vehicles are old and tired in desperate need of the refurb they are getting over next few years. Just another example of a short term money saving coming back to bite in the long run, something that unsurprisingly made its way into Defence Sec's Rusi speech as he is having to deal with the consequences.
Well, let's be honest: how much has been done in recent years to save money, rather than enhance performance?

Rhetorical question.
 
Bad to form to quote oneself but Wallace has just aired the idea that these onerous tasks will be transferred to the Reserve….
Join the reserve, do shit jobs…
 

Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer

Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer
Does he know that the reservists doing those roles were busy doing them in their civvy jobs already? I suspect not...

Proper bold thinking would be something along the lines of transferring all the heavy roles to the reserves...
What like CR2 and MLRS? :roll:
 
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