Real Life Pte Ryan

oldbaldy

LE
Moderator
#1
Rosalie Johnson's family was torn apart when she lost three sons in the horrors of the Great War – and received three heartbreaking telegrams informing her of each of their deaths.

Mrs Johnson's one consolation was that a fourth soldier son, Bobbie, survived, despite suffering appalling chest injuries in battle.
The real life of Private Ryan: Agony of the First World War mother who sent four sons into battle... but only one came back | Mail Online

I'm sure other families lost 3 children in WW1 & this acticle shows the realities for them.
 
#2
I thought the real Pte Ryan was a lad from E company 506th reg 101 AB of band of brothers fame? No "mission" to get him he was just taken off the line and sent back.
 

oldbaldy

LE
Moderator
#3
It was supposed to based loosely on the Niland brothers, one of whom was in the 501 Parachute Infantry Regiment & had friends in the 506.
Niland brothers - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Another US family lost five brothers in WW2:
All were serving on USS Juneau when it was sunk on 13 November 1942. It was because of this and the Borgstrom brothers, who were all killed in 1944, the US changed it's poilicy on siblings.
Sullivan brothers - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Borgstrom brothers - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
#4
There are plenty of families lost 'all but one', probably as many as lost 'all'.
 
#5
The mothers, however, have made geneology research a bit of a nightmare: if they lost a son in WWI and they were of an age to have further children, the style of the time was that they would name any males after the one that was lost.

My Great Great Grandmother and her sister both did so, resulting in plethora of John William 40Cs!
 
#8
CWGC - Casualty Details

4 Garland brothers in the RAF were killed in WW2.
You'd have thought the RAF could have posted an officer off flying duties towards the end of WW2, but apparently not.
 
#9

_Chimurenga_

LE
Gallery Guru
#10

oldbaldy

LE
Moderator
#11
The mothers, however, have made geneology research a bit of a nightmare: if they lost a son in WWI and they were of an age to have further children, the style of the time was that they would name any males after the one that was lost.

My Great Great Grandmother and her sister both did so, resulting in plethora of John William 40Cs!
Started much earlier than WW1, I have examples of a child dying & then another born a couple of years after the death being given the same name.
Women also had a tendency to name children after brothers killed in WW1, my own father being one and I am named after a brother of my mother killed in WW2.
 

_Chimurenga_

LE
Gallery Guru
#12
Started much earlier than WW1, I have examples of a child dying & then another born a couple of years after the death being given the same name.
Women also had a tendency to name children after brothers killed in WW1, my own father being one and I am named after a brother of my mother killed in WW2.
I have a sister and a cousin who were both named after my uncle who was killed on Iwo Jima (24 Feb 1945).
 
#13
Started much earlier than WW1, I have examples of a child dying & then another born a couple of years after the death being given the same name.
Women also had a tendency to name children after brothers killed in WW1, my own father being one and I am named after a brother of my mother killed in WW2.
Named my daughter after my dad's G/F who died in a PoW camp in WW1
 
#14
Go away, you irritating cock-boil.
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
#16
why pick a ww1 story to validate a ww2 story. its all based on something lincoln did during the United (at gunpoint) States civil war. IIRC

anyway its a bit selfish to not allow the 4th son to die like the rest of his brothers when plenty of single son families lost their only future.
 
#17
I recall reading that because of the appalling numbers of casualties that were suffered by somtimes quite small communities in WWI, especially with units like the Pals battalions, The policy in WW2 was to spread troops out into different regiments and units that may have had no local connection to the individual.
 
#18
It was supposed to based loosely on the Niland brothers, one of whom was in the 501 Parachute Infantry Regiment & had friends in the 506.
Niland brothers - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Another US family lost five brothers in WW2:
All were serving on USS Juneau when it was sunk on 13 November 1942. It was because of this and the Borgstrom brothers, who were all killed in 1944, the US changed it's poilicy on siblings.
Sullivan brothers - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Borgstrom brothers - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
USS Juneau was hit port side by a long lance and was on its way out of the battle the next day in company of USS Helena and USS San Francisco when torpedoedin the same spot as the night before, broke in 2 and sank in 20 seconds.

There were 10 eventual survivors oif the 100 some odd crew who got off her, shark attacks took most during the 8 days they were adrift. the Juneau was also known in the USN as a Brothers ship. There were some 73 other sets of siblings serving aboard her including the 4 Rodgers brothers from New Haven CT when she went down. George Sullivan appears to have ingested large amounts of sea water and went into a hallucination and swam away from the carlisle float never to be seen again.

As an aside I served with 4 Murphy brothers in 1983, one had even paid off a replacement center clerk to be assigned to the unit, And in Afghanistan in 08 My former Plt Sgt had his son and his nephew in his platoon in kunar province. He now has another son and a cousin in his company. Not to mention my company commander in 1988 Cpt S and the Bn CSM, CSM S were son-father
 
#19
Named my daughter after my dad's G/F who died in a PoW camp in WW1
I'm hoping G/F means grandfather rather than girlfriend ? ;-)

Would have been nicer had you named your daughter after your great grandfather rather than your dad's grandfather .... ;-)

Thankfully i am not in a position to know if the grief suffered by a mother losing her only son is less or greater than a mother losing all but one of her sons - however many that might be.
 
#20
There is a British example which to me is even more poignant.

Pte Fred Dancocks (orDancox) VC of the 4th Worcs was one of four out of five brothers and step brothers who died in the Great War. These were all members of a large and poor Worcester family. Dancocks's occupation was "hay trusser"which sounds like seasonal work. No surprise that his family sold the VC. None of the men who died has a known grave.
 
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