Re-settlement fads

#1
When I started my re-settlent at the end of '99 it was people trying to do their MCSE (Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer or Must Consult Someone Experienced as it has become known) course. 10 years before I remember everyone doing their HGV 1 as it was almost impossible to get it via the army back then! What are todays faddish courses which the resettlement officers are steering everyone off to do? (as if they knew about civvy jobs anyway!). I'm just curious as my particular job sector (systems admin) is now overflowing with newly qualified yet inexperienced people trying desperately to get jobs whilst swimming in a sea of older and more employable bods and I'm just wondering wether peole look at the area they wish to work in as a civvy to check on job availablity when they are to enter the jobs market.
 
#2
Gas Fitter and Plumber.
Surely there cant be that many gaps, every punter i hear who is resettling is doing this at the mo!
I remember some guy telling everyone he was the Millenium Bug superman waiting to rid the world of this terrible ailment. Sure enough he is teaching Basic Engines now at Bordon the Reme school he left only a few years before his calling! Bill Gates to Geeky Instructor ha ha
Oh how the mighty fall.
 
#3
PRINCE 1 & 2. Everyone wants to be a project manager, however nobody knows quite what one does..........
 
#5
Oh dear! I wonder what they are going to bluff on their CV's to get their first jobs!
 
#6
Speedy said:
Oh dear! I wonder what they are going to bluff on their CV's to get their first jobs!
IT types should be aware that DII are looking for loads of regional managers at the mo.

One of my lance jacks recently left and walked straight into one of those jobs. His experience consisted of pretty much only JOCS system admin. He's a good bloke, but inexperienced. There you go though...lucky bloke. Good luck to him.
 
#7
Darth_Doctrinus said:
PRINCE is definitely on the list. I know 4 people who have done it in the last 3 months!
Does anyone rate the military one (run at RMCS Shrivenham) in a resettlement context?
 
B

Biscuits_AB

Guest
#8
Speedy said:
When I started my re-settlent at the end of '99 it was people trying to do their MCSE (Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer or Must Consult Someone Experienced as it has become known) course. 10 years before I remember everyone doing their HGV 1 as it was almost impossible to get it via the army back then! What are todays faddish courses which the resettlement officers are steering everyone off to do? (as if they knew about civvy jobs anyway!). I'm just curious as my particular job sector (systems admin) is now overflowing with newly qualified yet inexperienced people trying desperatey to get jobs whilst swimming in a sea of older and more employable bods and I'm just wonering wether epole look at the area they wist to work in as a civvy to check on job availablity when they are to enter the jobs market.
LE Commissioning is a great resettlement course by all accounts.
 
#9
plumbing and any sort of "hands on " trade seem to be the way ahead! since the yts scheme fell apart all those years ago ,no-one wanted £27.50 a week !! thats why so many of us joined up- waiting for the right time to get our corgi licence!!
 
#10
During the 80's, all the prospective civvies where going outside to be independent financial advisors. This seemed to involve selling financial products to friends/family/household pets, then having to find a proper job when all possible leads are exhausted.
The boom in cable TV during the mid 90s lead to many matelots leaving the mob for careers in the fibre-optic industry, otherwise known as digging trenches for telewest!
 
#11
Biscuits_AB said:
LE Commissioning is a great resettlement course by all accounts.
Great! Doing Sqn PT getting beasted by some power-crazed local lance-jack when you're 40-odd years old. Deep joy.
 
#12
clanky said:
...The boom in cable TV during the mid 90s lead to many matelots leaving the mob for careers in the fibre-optic industry, otherwise known as digging trenches for telewest!
I recall one Spec Op who'd been doing 'interesting' work in the province. He left to do the fibre-optic course and got his first job installing cable on the Falls Road. 1 x twitching arse coming up!
 
#13
Biscuits_AB said:
LE Commissioning is a great resettlement course by all accounts.
As long as you go for a job advertised as "Wanted - old bloke who struggles to adapt to a new environment."

Sorry - a sweeping generalisation and uncalled for I know!
 
#14
Half the guys I know seem to have done something active, one got 6 weeks in Thailand learning to dive and completeing most of his Dive Instructor courses (PADI)...he's now bumbing round South Africe occassionally teaching diving.

J_T_4T
 
#15
Just done my CTW and two offrs wanted to do PRINCE2. I have done the PRINC2 at Shrivenham and it is done by a civvi company any you sit the exam at the end HOWEVER, apparantly they will not load you if you are clearly on your way into civ st so be creative on your application.

The main areas on my CTW was project management, IT-Comms (it was near Elmpt) security and H&S.

Who remembers when it was all a simple HGV and Forklft licence with AMRAF!!!!
 
#16
In the two years before I left, I did something that was strongly discouraged by my boss a nasty Brigadier. I diod an MBA to much hoots of management rubbish etc. (This dates me. Nowadays thestaff are full of the same BS straight from the mouths of McxKinsey ;) )

Distance learnoing MBA was bloody useful. Not because it trained me in any single skill, but because it demystified the different areas of business. Combine that with some common sense and bags of confidence and its possible to beleive you havce something to add to any task.
 
#17
bullshit said:
Who remembers when it was all a simple HGV and Forklft licence with AMRAF!!!!
I remember those days well mate. Anyway, you're not fooling anyone - just keep studying the 1s and 0s and you'll be sorted. I've still got a copy of your CV from nearly 9 years ago and it was pretty impressive back then!

I'm going to do the PRINCE2 in the new year as well. Might as well, since I can get it through the firm. Anyone aware of any SFIA or ITIL courses that we can do through the firm to feather the proverbial nests?

Pteranadon said:
In the two years before I left, I did something that was strongly discouraged by my boss a nasty Brigadier. I diod an MBA to much hoots of management rubbish etc. (This dates me. Nowadays thestaff are full of the same BS straight from the mouths of McxKinsey ;) )
I'm considering the MBA it at the moment (fund it using my Extended Learning Credits). I've done 4 of my 6 years towards the OU Business Degree BA Hons, but coupled with a Diploma in Mgmt it seems that I can go straight into level 2 of the MBA. Not sure how much time will start to go against me as I've got 4.5 years left. If I do the whole BA (Hons) then I'll be left with 2.5 years to try and get MBA before completing my 22. I hear the OU MBA is actually quite highly regarded and I really can't afford to go to full time college whn I leave, since my youngest two kids will still be at school.

My options are:

1. Stop the degree path now - cash in my current points and take the lower ranked Diploma in Business (to join my Mgmt Diploma) and go straight into the MBA. programme giving myself plenty of time.

2. Finish next year's OU (Digital Comms) - take the 2 x Diplomas in ICT and Business Studies respectively and add to my Mgmt one. Not even sure if they count for much in the grand scheme of things. Then do my MBA and fit it into approx 3.5 years.

3. Finish BA(Hons) course to aim off incase events overtake me and I can't do the MBA.

What would my learned colleagues suggest?
 
#18
Cardinal,

What you want is an NVQ1 in Marching.

I'm also doing OU (shortly going into my 3rd year) and was wondering how are the OU Diplomas looked upon? Am I wasting my time? And the NVQ 4 in Management-is it worth doing?

Lastly, can anyone suggest any really snazzy and useful courses to do with the ELC when it turns into 2 grand that don't time expire like some IT courses?
 
#19
CardinalSin said:
I'm considering the MBA it at the moment (fund it using my Extended Learning Credits). I've done 4 of my 6 years towards the OU Business Degree BA Hons, but coupled with a Diploma in Mgmt it seems that I can go straight into level 2 of the MBA. Not sure how much time will start to go against me as I've got 4.5 years left. If I do the whole BA (Hons) then I'll be left with 2.5 years to try and get MBA before completing my 22. I hear the OU MBA is actually quite highly regarded and I really can't afford to go to full time college whn I leave, since my youngest two kids will still be at school.

My options are:

1. Stop the degree path now - cash in my current points and take the lower ranked Diploma in Business (to join my Mgmt Diploma) and go straight into the MBA. programme giving myself plenty of time.

2. Finish next year's OU (Digital Comms) - take the 2 x Diplomas in ICT and Business Studies respectively and add to my Mgmt one. Not even sure if they count for much in the grand scheme of things. Then do my MBA and fit it into approx 3.5 years.

3. Finish BA(Hons) course to aim off incase events overtake me and I can't do the MBA.

What would my learned colleagues suggest?
It depends what you will get out of the courses and what you want to do when you leave.

The OU is a good MBA. Masters Degrees are valued as evidence of higher educational standards and potential. (Even if Dubbya has one) It will give you a good general gounding in business and the ability to ask quewstions that cut through someone's bluff.

It does count for more than a management diploma, but it isn;t an automatic passport to a nice consultancy job -unless you forge the sertificate to say Harvard not OU ;)

How are you finding the course work? It can be lonely doing DL. Have you a decent study group. Do you think you can do it in HM's time. Its a lot easier than fitting OU around a job.


Don't dismiss the option of completing the MBA full time. I did that when I left and it was a help.

I did two years of a Warwick DL MBA while in the army. I converted the credits into the equivalent of two terms and joined the Full time course at Easter, paying for the course from my resettlement grant. I was lucky because I also pickedup one day a week's consultancy work as well. It was good fun and I learned a lot doing the full time course. My course project was very valuableexperience.(I did a mini consulting assignment for LIFFE the financial futures exchange). Liffe paid me a small fee and it added work experience with a good company to my CV. It also gave me six months to de militarise myself and look for a job.

The mix of fulltime and distance learning also complements each other. Distance Learning feels a real struggle. I couldn't enjoy a weekend for four years. It was eoither the work or the guilt of not doing it ;) If you are like me (and the rest of my study group) pressures of work and family squeeze the time available for study. I always had a feeling that I could have done better on my assignmentsa but just did the minimum just to get the assignment out of the way. However, what you won't know is that,unlike full tiem students you will have had a lot more time to think about each topic and will be far more likely to have read and absorbed the work. Full time MBA is very fast paced and material sometimes goes in one ear, is retained long enough for an assignment and then forgoitten ;) However it is a chance to meet civies in a place geared to people making career changes.
 
#20
Cheers for the response Pteranadon - I'll give it a better read when I'm less tired (it's getting late).

I've been studying DL now for 4 yrs so I reckon I can hack it a bit longer. To be honest I have been doing the minimum really. Like you said, there's family to think about. Interesting point about the one day consultancy stuff though.

By the time I leave I'll be 40 with 10 years in IT Management, 10 yrs as a WO/SNCO looking after troops, running technical projects and some reasonably interesting stuff on my CV (civvy IT quals) so realistically I should be OK for a decent job but I'm one of those attention deficit disorder blokes who is never satisfied unless I'm stupidly busy on something. If I stopped studying I'd only get into trouble (and have to listen to my wife :wink:)
 

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