Rats in the attic....

I have used the Rentokil advanced mouse trap. It is expensive at about £10, but it kills whatever it catches cleanly and quickly.
Mice are disruptive and upsetting, good luck with getting rid of them soon.
 
We had a rat problem in the garden. My family are bird lovers and we keep a bird table in the garden with various things on it for the birds to eat. The birds routinely drop stuff on the ground and that attracted the rats. It was becoming disturbingly commonplace to look out of the garden and see a rat scurrying to and from the area where the bird table is.

Poisoning the rats was out of the question because we have a dog and she will eat anything she finds. So it had to be a trap of some description. Out of respect for my family's sensibilities, I opted for one of these humane cage traps that catch the things alive so you can move them on somewhere.

So anyway, I set the thing up and waited a few days and sure enough, one morning, I looked out of the window and there's a rat in the trap. So I chucked the trap in the car and transported it two miles away to Harmondsworth Moor where I let it free in some parkland there.

Feeling pleased that I had a solution to our rat problem, I returned home and reset the trap. It sat out there for days without a nibble. The bait was getting wet in the weather so I decided to replace it. A few days later, still no luck. I then googled what was the best bait for catching rats and changed the bait. A few days later, still no luck. Then the bait started working.

The problem was, they were getting the bait out of the trap without setting the trap off. The trap was a cage with a cantilever mechanism in it. You placed the bait on a hook hanging just above a tray. The rat should enter the cage and to get to the bait, it would need to stand on the tray and pull the bait off the hook. Movement on either the tray or the hook would jog the bar and the trap would snap shut.

It wasn't working though. The rats were having their cake and eating it so to speak and I couldn't work out how they were doing so without setting off the trap.

I did eventually have the last laugh........ I got a cat!
 
Sit rep... I thought I had one mouse, I've caught four of the little bastards now. Well, the first one was huge (and dead) and the other three have been a lot smaller and have only been caught in the traps (bodies half crushed etc). My main method of dispatch is drop into a carrier bag and batter it with a small shovel.

I can't figure out where they've got in either. Off to buy some more traps later.
Any hole you can get the top of a Bic pen through, a mouse can get through. Doesn't mean it particularly likes doing this, but they can squeeze through pretty tiny gaps. Bung up holes with a mixture of cement and wire wool, that makes chewing through much more difficult for them.

Outside, try and reduce the amount of available food, like bird feeders and the like. Do the same indoors too. That reduces the draw for them, and reduces the breeding rate. Keep on with the traps until they don't seem to be catching many, then start putting down poison baits outside. Eradi-mouse is OK, works but they need to be scoffing loads of it.
 
We had a rat problem in the garden. My family are bird lovers and we keep a bird table in the garden with various things on it for the birds to eat. The birds routinely drop stuff on the ground and that attracted the rats. It was becoming disturbingly commonplace to look out of the garden and see a rat scurrying to and from the area where the bird table is.

Poisoning the rats was out of the question because we have a dog and she will eat anything she finds. So it had to be a trap of some description. Out of respect for my family's sensibilities, I opted for one of these humane cage traps that catch the things alive so you can move them on somewhere.

So anyway, I set the thing up and waited a few days and sure enough, one morning, I looked out of the window and there's a rat in the trap. So I chucked the trap in the car and transported it two miles away to Harmondsworth Moor where I let it free in some parkland there.

Feeling pleased that I had a solution to our rat problem, I returned home and reset the trap. It sat out there for days without a nibble. The bait was getting wet in the weather so I decided to replace it. A few days later, still no luck. I then googled what was the best bait for catching rats and changed the bait. A few days later, still no luck. Then the bait started working.

The problem was, they were getting the bait out of the trap without setting the trap off. The trap was a cage with a cantilever mechanism in it. You placed the bait on a hook hanging just above a tray. The rat should enter the cage and to get to the bait, it would need to stand on the tray and pull the bait off the hook. Movement on either the tray or the hook would jog the bar and the trap would snap shut.

It wasn't working though. The rats were having their cake and eating it so to speak and I couldn't work out how they were doing so without setting off the trap.

I did eventually have the last laugh........ I got a cat!
Those traps usually need a little tweaking to get the sensitivity right.
I put the bait inside a small piece of old net curtain, then hang that on the hook, so the buggers pull at it.
Put the trap under something to make it dark inside, otherwise blackbirds & starlings cotton on & start stealing the bait/getting trapped.
 
Why spend any money getting rid of Bats? They do no harm, and usually bugger off on their own.

We had a Bat roost in our last quarter (via a gap in the facia into the attic) No idea how many but there were loads of droppings. We did not hear them in the attic and only saw them occasionally until they moved on after a few months.
Living with bats - Bat Conservation Trust
If they don't move on there will come a point where those droppings will start to smell and you will need to go and clean out. Also they're pretty acidic so won't do timber much good.
 
If they don't move on there will come a point where those droppings will start to smell and you will need to go and clean out. Also they're pretty acidic so won't do timber much good.
The basic problem with bats is that they are protected under various Acts, and this then gives an opportunity for all manner of official parasites to milk you of money pertaining to the bats in various ways. Things like proving that there aren't bats in the building at all, ever (which is next to impossible and winds up costing a packet) and demonstrating that bats cannot get into or out of a building.

A cottage industry of extremely thorough cash-only cleaners has sprung up in response; for a set fee in cash these chaps will turn up, remove any and all traces of bat from a building, bat-proof the building then vanish in a cloud of diesel smoke, never to be seen again.

Alternatively, I do believe it is quite common for stupid foreign builders to mistake order to "Level out this ground and build a hardcore driveway" for "completely demolish this historic barn and use the hardcore to make a road". The poor unfortunate houseowner then is faced with the task of rebuilding the demolished building, a task which can proceed rapidly since there are certainly now no bats present.
 
Any hole you can get the top of a Bic pen through, a mouse can get through. Doesn't mean it particularly likes doing this, but they can squeeze through pretty tiny gaps. Bung up holes with a mixture of cement and wire wool, that makes chewing through much more difficult for them.

Outside, try and reduce the amount of available food, like bird feeders and the like. Do the same indoors too. That reduces the draw for them, and reduces the breeding rate. Keep on with the traps until they don't seem to be catching many, then start putting down poison baits outside. Eradi-mouse is OK, works but they need to be scoffing loads of it.
Will do. There's no bird feeders outside and no obvious attractions. I will keep on trapping and then follow your advice to poison the areas.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
We had a rat problem in the garden. My family are bird lovers and we keep a bird table in the garden with various things on it for the birds to eat.

...

I did eventually have the last laugh........ I got a cat!
Excellent.
They love birds too.
 
The basic problem with bats is that they are protected under various Acts, and this then gives an opportunity for all manner of official parasites to milk you of money pertaining to the bats in various ways. Things like proving that there aren't bats in the building at all, ever (which is next to impossible and winds up costing a packet) and demonstrating that bats cannot get into or out of a building.

A cottage industry of extremely thorough cash-only cleaners has sprung up in response; for a set fee in cash these chaps will turn up, remove any and all traces of bat from a building, bat-proof the building then vanish in a cloud of diesel smoke, never to be seen again.

Alternatively, I do believe it is quite common for stupid foreign builders to mistake order to "Level out this ground and build a hardcore driveway" for "completely demolish this historic barn and use the hardcore to make a road". The poor unfortunate houseowner then is faced with the task of rebuilding the demolished building, a task which can proceed rapidly since there are certainly now no bats present.
Heard today that the good folk of Adelaide are experiencing a bat problem during their current heatwave. Apparently lethargic bats are falling out of the trees.

Heard on Classic FM so no linky. Imagine two people of later years howling with laughter at the thought of bat bombs, plummetting bats, and flat bats!
 

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