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Raspberry Pis - anyone else?

RBMK

LE
Book Reviewer
I rather like this:

1604847998886.png


it reminds my a bit of my old BBC Master 128. Unfortunately I don't have anything that I want to do with one that my PC doesn't already do!
 
I rather like this:

View attachment 518882

it reminds my a bit of my old BBC Master 128. Unfortunately I don't have anything that I want to do with one that my PC doesn't already do!

I was looking at this on ”Pi Hut” the other night and quite fancy one


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
I'll be waiting until they do an 8gb model. I switched to the 8gb pi the day it was released. The 4gb really couldn't cope with Sketchup, the 8b does.

Sent from my neocore_E1R1 using Tapatalk
 
Been watching this thread for a while.
I quite like the idea of The Pi but why should I "get into it"?

With that in mind;
Please give 5 reasons(or more) of why "I" should start learning and playing about with Pi's?

SK

p.s please understand that I am not berating anyone for playing about with pi's! In fact quite the opposite. Looking at some threads on reddit about Pi's, some folks have really done some interesting stuff e.g building a hallway mirror with built in weather report scrolling across the mirror.
 

RBMK

LE
Book Reviewer
Unless you have something in mind, then it's not worth it unless you want to learn e.g. programming or "coding" but then you need something to do with it.

One of my mates uses a Pi to control his model railway via a wireless link to his phone!
Another one of my mates uses it to operate his TV and media centre (has all his music on HDD as MP3s)

Someone else I know chucked his desktop PC when it went chips and is now running a Pi with Linux as his home PC.
 
Been watching this thread for a while.
I quite like the idea of The Pi but why should I "get into it"?

With that in mind;
Please give 5 reasons(or more) of why "I" should start learning and playing about with Pi's?

SK

p.s please understand that I am not berating anyone for playing about with pi's! In fact quite the opposite. Looking at some threads on reddit about Pi's, some folks have really done some interesting stuff e.g building a hallway mirror with built in weather report scrolling across the mirror.

Probably for the pretty much limitless possibilities! So far I have built among other things a home CCTV system, a network attached storage device for backups, an ad blocking system for all devices on my network, a network speed tester and my main project an aircraft tracker that upload it's data for others to see.

I've had a ton of fun working on these projects and am now up to 12 on total.

If you fancy having a go for free I'd be more than happy to send you one of my spares and happy to assist in anyway that I can

One word of warning thought it IS addictive and you will soon find yourself finding all sorts of uses for them!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
I rather like this:

View attachment 518882

it reminds my a bit of my old BBC Master 128. Unfortunately I don't have anything that I want to do with one that my PC doesn't already do!
You’d have to wonder if the keyboard itself cuts the mustard.



Been watching this thread for a while.
I quite like the idea of The Pi but why should I "get into it"?
I bought a sub £5.00 Pi Zero (plus a power supply and a couple of ancillary bits and bobs along with a second sub £5.00 Pi zero just in case).

The first one has been in continuous service ever since running pihole and the second is unused but in readiness should the first one to fail.

Great piece of kit. I keep looking at buying more stuff but to date, haven’t identified anything I want to build or run.
 

RBMK

LE
Book Reviewer
The one thing I really liked about my BBC Master was that the keyboard was virtually indestructable, to the point where you could replace individual keys!

Mine took 6 years of continual hammering more or less 7 days a week and was good as new when I sold it (a big regret to this day)
 
The one thing I really liked about my BBC Master was that the keyboard was virtually indestructable, to the point where you could replace individual keys!

Mine took 6 years of continual hammering more or less 7 days a week and was good as new when I sold it (a big regret to this day)
I still have (in their original packaging and complete with all cables, accessories and books etc):



a Texas Instruments TI99/4A plus sundry ROM cartridges.

1604868883009.jpeg



and a Memotech MTX512.

1604868798491.jpeg



plus, without packaging but in pristine condition, I also have a Memotech DMX80 dot matrix printer.

EF2F0005-EAC2-4425-AAA9-176BA095ED96.jpeg


Probably worth nought but my, how I loved them at the time.
 

Statistics

War Hero
I rather like this:

View attachment 518882

it reminds my a bit of my old BBC Master 128. Unfortunately I don't have anything that I want to do with one that my PC doesn't already do!
Mine arrived Friday. Keyboard very usable, whole thing feels well made. Got RetroPi on there now. Working like a charm.

Sent from my SM-G975F using Tapatalk
 

tgo

War Hero
I rather like this:

View attachment 518882

it reminds my a bit of my old BBC Master 128. Unfortunately I don't have anything that I want to do with one that my PC doesn't already do!
I don't.
It's a backward step, reminiscent of the old 'home computers' like zx spectrum, c64 etc.

You lose more than you gain, for example.

You have lost a USB port (presumably used for the keyboard)
no audio out

Ok so not that bad but you also lose.

The ability to use your own case (of which there are many) including ones with far superior thermal properties

You now have something with about 2x the footprint of before.

What is the 'benefit' of this

a built in keyboard....

whoopy doo

These are designed to be hobbyist machines, very often they are headless (no monitor connected) and stuck up in a loft or on the end of a pole, like mine, for example supplying data for Flight Radar or other activities where you don't need a 'desktop' style computer.
 
I don't.
It's a backward step, reminiscent of the old 'home computers' like zx spectrum, c64 etc.

You lose more than you gain, for example.

You have lost a USB port (presumably used for the keyboard)
no audio out

Ok so not that bad but you also lose.

The ability to use your own case (of which there are many) including ones with far superior thermal properties

You now have something with about 2x the footprint of before.

What is the 'benefit' of this

a built in keyboard....

whoopy doo

These are designed to be hobbyist machines, very often they are headless (no monitor connected) and stuck up in a loft or on the end of a pole, like mine, for example supplying data for Flight Radar or other activities where you don't need a 'desktop' style computer.

It makes it more accessible for kids. Which is the original target market.
 

tgo

War Hero
It makes it more accessible for kids. Which is the original target market.
Don't buy that.

They've been making them (as you rightly pointed out) for Kids since 2012

USB/bluetooth keyboards are available for pennies and require no drivers or anything non kid friendly to set up.

Pretty sure it hasn't taken almost 9 years for them to think 'oh what about the kids'
 
Don't buy that.

They've been making them (as you rightly pointed out) for Kids since 2012

USB/bluetooth keyboards are available for pennies and require no drivers or anything non kid friendly to set up.

Pretty sure it hasn't taken almost 9 years for them to think 'oh what about the kids'

"Seven hundred thousand kids got sent home from school in March without a PC," he explains.
"This is a machine for anyone who needs a PC. And [if] there's one thing we've learned this year - there are still vast numbers in society who need a PC."

That's from the man himself. Argue away.
 
Don't buy that.

They've been making them (as you rightly pointed out) for Kids since 2012

USB/bluetooth keyboards are available for pennies and require no drivers or anything non kid friendly to set up.

Pretty sure it hasn't taken almost 9 years for them to think 'oh what about the kids'
How about it is aimed at those low budget users that are frightened off at the thought of a pcb and a box of bits etc.

Horses for courses I’d say. Some will go for the convenience of it.

By the time you have bought a Pi 4, psu, cables, heat sink, case, keyboard, mouse, OS on an SD card etc, the out of the box solution will work for those who want something more than a headless PI performing a specific single task.
 

tgo

War Hero
"Seven hundred thousand kids got sent home from school in March without a PC," he explains.
"This is a machine for anyone who needs a PC. And [if] there's one thing we've learned this year - there are still vast numbers in society who need a PC."

That's from the man himself. Argue away.
Sure sure.

It's also 3x the price of a 'regular' Pi which has the exact same internals minus the keyboard. I could get a gold plated keyboard for the £60 price difference...

It still uses the exact same software, making out the built in keyboard will make life so much easier for those poor wretches who are PC less is a bit of a desperate ploy. (good for moneymaking though)
 

tgo

War Hero
How about it is aim at those low budget user that are frightened off at the thought of a pcb and a box of bits etc.

Horses for courses I’d say. Some will go for the convenience of it.

By the time you have bought a Pi 4, psu, cables, heat sink, case, keyboard, mouse, OS on an SD card etc the out of the box solution will work for those who want something more than a headless PI performing a specific single task.
Yea I know.

I'm just being contrary :)

Colour me cynical.
 

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