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Raspberry Pis - anyone else?

Sussed it! I was over tightening the camera module onto the camera housing and it was pulling the connector out between the camera PCB and the camera module (a little push fit connector). Ripped it all apart and the camera part literally dropped off!

Put it back together more carefully this time and BOOM it works!!!!

Many thanks for the offer @Morticiaskeeper
 
Sussed it! I was over tightening the camera module onto the camera housing and it was pulling the connector out between the camera PCB and the camera module (a little push fit connector). Ripped it all apart and the camera part literally dropped off!

Put it back together more carefully this time and BOOM it works!!!!

Many thanks for the offer @Morticiaskeeper
No problems.

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I've just got an 8GB Pi 4 - and Argon case. Changed the bootloader to boot from USB and fitted a USB3 SSD - man that thing is very fast to boot and run stuff from. Even cross compiling is fast on it. Happy days!
 

tgo

War Hero
They were supposed to update Raspbian to allow USB/SSD as boot drive natively a few weeks ago, rather than the hackery currently needed. Although I've heard nothing since so not sure if they have or not.
 
They were supposed to update Raspbian to allow USB/SSD as boot drive natively a few weeks ago, rather than the hackery currently needed. Although I've heard nothing since so not sure if they have or not.
It's now an official stable release, not hack needed.
 

tgo

War Hero
It's now an official stable release, not hack needed.
So I just do a sudo apt-get dist-upgrade ? and I have the version with USB boot support? is there a version number or any other to indicate I have it?
--
I suppose it's possible I already updated to it without realising.

I'm on:

Processor: BCM2835

Distribution: Raspbian GNU/Linux 10 (buster)

Kernel version: Linux 4.19.118-v7l+ armv7l

Firmware: #1311
 
So I just do a sudo apt-get dist-upgrade ? and I have the version with USB boot support? is there a version number or any other to indicate I have it?
--
I suppose it's possible I already updated to it without realising.

I'm on:

Processor: BCM2835

Distribution: Raspbian GNU/Linux 10 (buster)

Kernel version: Linux 4.19.118-v7l+ armv7l

Firmware: #1311
You do, this:

sudo apt update
sudo apt full-upgrade
sudo reboot

There's a full article here on all the options and where bootloaders are stored as files.


Here's a video:
 
I've just opened the distance sensor. The board has four pins for connection to the pi, but you need to add Resistors to drop the echo signal down to 3v3.

I soldered a bit of vero board to the pins and put a 330r in the echo line & a 470r between signal out and 0v. A 4 pin header for the outputs let's me use the normal connecting leads.

A few lines of code and gpiozero gave me an error, saying that echo was held high. I should have RTFM'd, but I just swapped the pins in code and it works.

At the moment, I'm just reading the distance every second, so most of the time it is reading 1.0m. Moving something solid towards the sensor gives a fairly accurate reading, within a few mm.

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I've just opened the distance sensor. The board has four pins for connection to the pi, but you need to add Resistors to drop the echo signal down to 3v3.

I soldered a bit of vero board to the pins and put a 330r in the echo line & a 470r between signal out and 0v. A 4 pin header for the outputs let's me use the normal connecting leads.

A few lines of code and gpiozero gave me an error, saying that echo was held high. I should have RTFM'd, but I just swapped the pins in code and it works.

At the moment, I'm just reading the distance every second, so most of the time it is reading 1.0m. Moving something solid towards the sensor gives a fairly accurate reading, within a few mm.

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First you don't say what version Pi you are using and second what part number the sensor is - also the GPIO pins on a PI are 3.3v, so why the resistors? If your sensor works on 5.0v and you need to send 5v data to a 3.3v GPIO - why not just use a level shifter instead of a voltage divider? if using resistors as a voltage divider - you should be using a 2k + 1k resistor.

You really should use this:

It's far more efficient compared to resistors.
 
Running it on a pi 4 8gb, because that was the only gpio pins handy, but I'll probably use it on a zero in the campervan.

I just followed the circuit in the gpiozero docs.

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Well the new camera module arrived Today and guess what the Pi doesnt see the new module, red light lights briefly on camera module bard then goes out.? I had narrowed it down to it being the camera module because another module on this pi worked fine and moving the existing camera to another Pi also caused that to have issues. I will move this new camera module to the existing Pi to make sure it runs fine on that...



Running it on a pi 4 8gb, because that was the only gpio pins handy, but I'll probably use it on a zero in the campervan.

I just followed the circuit in the gpiozero docs.

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E2a, the sensor is a SR04 with waterproof transducer

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E2a, the sensor is a SR04 with waterproof transducer

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Yep I had a look at the datasheet, the sensor operates on 5 volts, not just the vcc pin but also the trigger & echo pins - that's why you are better to use the logic level converter module so you convert the 3.3v GPIO pin from the pi to 5volts at the trigger pin on the sensor & 5v on the echo pin to 3.3v on the pi gpio pin. You can get 5v from the PI to supply the working voltage to the sensor + level converter.

Still if it's working fine for you and is accurate enough - good, just watch you don't fry your 3.3v gpio pins on the pi by putting too much voltage into them if using resistors though. Personally I would up the resistors to 1k + 2k like I said - and check the output voltage with a multi-meter before hooking up to the gpio pins. That will give you 3.33 volts, where the resistors you are using only gives 2.94 volts, which isn't the 5volts that the trigger pin requires (according to the datasheet). According to the datasheet - the trigger pin expects a 5volt burst for 10us to activate properly, echo pin then gets set high (5v). Probably the way you have it wired just now - the trigger pin is only getting 3.3v.
For future projects - invest in some logic level converter modules, they are very cheap and save a lot of time and use of resistors - especially when you start using Arduino or boards/sensors with 3.3v and 5v.

Also it's not just volts you need to take into consideration - you also have amperage (current draw)....but if you want to go down the voltage divider route - here's a handy calculator:


Just get some variable resistors and you can tweak them to get the perfect voltage - and not really need to worry to much about blowing them out as they can generally handle a bit more current than resistors you are probably using.
 
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Raspberry Pis was a cocktail made with Mongolian champagne that they used to serve in the Ganymed on Schiffbauerdamm, before the Wall came down.
After the nth one, you could just run out of the front door and vomit over a railing directly into the Spree, whilst the resident band would strike up "Tipperary."
 
Yep I had a look at the datasheet, the sensor operates on 5 volts, not just the vcc pin but also the trigger & echo pins - that's why you are better to use the logic level converter module so you convert the 3.3v GPIO pin from the pi to 5volts at the trigger pin on the sensor & 5v on the echo pin to 3.3v on the pi gpio pin. You can get 5v from the PI to supply the working voltage to the sensor + level converter.

Still if it's working fine for you and is accurate enough - good, just watch you don't fry your 3.3v gpio pins on the pi by putting too much voltage into them if using resistors though. Personally I would up the resistors to 1k + 2k like I said - and check the output voltage with a multi-meter before hooking up to the gpio pins. That will give you 3.33 volts, where the resistors you are using only gives 2.94 volts, which isn't the 5volts that the trigger pin requires (according to the datasheet). According to the datasheet - the trigger pin expects a 5volt burst for 10us to activate properly, echo pin then gets set high (5v). Probably the way you have it wired just now - the trigger pin is only getting 3.3v.
For future projects - invest in some logic level converter modules, they are very cheap and save a lot of time and use of resistors - especially when you start using Arduino or boards/sensors with 3.3v and 5v.

Also it's not just volts you need to take into consideration - you also have amperage (current draw)....but if you want to go down the voltage divider route - here's a handy calculator:


Just get some variable resistors and you can tweak them to get the perfect voltage - and not really need to worry to much about blowing them out as they can generally handle a bit more current than resistors you are probably using.
I'll probably get a couple of those converters, useful to have in stock.

When my brother sent the faulty Stair Lighting system to me, and I found he was using 6v, I was surprised that the pi zero survived. There were 17 gpio pins being used and he said the 16 way relay board was getting too hot to touch. He also admitted putting 12v to the relay board.

Back in the midsts of time, one transistor fault fried a whole board of 741 op amps on a Citronic audio mixer. CMOS handling was critical to the point of buying spares.

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17 pins for stair lighting? fook - he should have just used addressable leds, you only need vcc + gnd + 1 gpio pin (2 max depending on the leds you use). You also only need a few millivolts going to a transistor (gpio via a resistor to a transistor base), then connect the transistor output to the relay to operate it (then led driver voltage/current at the relay input). I take it he was using 240volt or 12v led lights on the stairs? and was using the relay to supply them. Seems like a lots of waste in power consumption to be honest, if would have been cheaper to just use either 5v or 12v addressable leds.
 
17 pins for stair lighting? fook - he should have just used addressable leds, you only need vcc + gnd + 1 gpio pin (2 max depending on the leds you use). You also only need a few millivolts going to a transistor (gpio via a resistor to a transistor base), then connect the transistor output to the relay to operate it (then led driver voltage/current at the relay input). I take it he was using 240volt or 12v led lights on the stairs? and was using the relay to supply them. Seems like a lots of waste in power consumption to be honest, if would have been cheaper to just use either 5v or 12v addressable leds.
I didn't even know about the system until he'd bought the parts, then realised he had no idea how to write the software.

I sent him the code, but he still had problems, so the whole lot came to me to get working.

The Ubec to supply the 5v was set to 6v, which did lots of false triggering and heat generation. The 12v psu gave enough interference to trigger the pir sensors if they were too near. The mode change button was also false triggering if it was anywhere near the psu. I fixed that in software by setting a minimum button press time and triggering from the release rather than the press.

He, or probably his daughter, kept suggesting different modes, so it will sequence up or down in one's, twos, threes and fours, all at a time and moving holes. Different ascent and descent times and off delay timing, all controlled from a yaml config file. I'm hoping they forget about the idea of a webapp, because then I'll have to remember php as well.

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A couple of questions about PiHole if I may.
How long does it take to set up?
I have a Pi 1 Model B, could I use that without too much fettling, or should I get a Pi 4?
 
A couple of questions about PiHole if I may.
How long does it take to set up?
I have a Pi 1 Model B, could I use that without too much fettling, or should I get a Pi 4?
I run pihole on a headless £4.50 pi zero... didn’t take long from out the box to pihole running...

... and it keeps running with barely any user intervention. The occasional update, the occasional timed disable and any changes to white/black list is about it.
 
A couple of questions about PiHole if I may.
How long does it take to set up?
I have a Pi 1 Model B, could I use that without too much fettling, or should I get a Pi 4?
I ahd it running on a Pi Zero so just about any hardware is sufficient for it. Took very little time to set up to be honest with you and needs little to no user intervention once you are setup.

To get everything on your network to use it you need to disabled DHCP on your router and enable it on your PiHole so PiHole assigns IP addresses and also on tour router in DNS settings point it to Pihole so PiHole does all of the DNS translation.

I had some issues with it TBH but I think that was more down to wifi disconnects in my home as it's a very stable piece of software.
 

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