Raspberry Pis - anyone else?

Think I've solved it. Now able to see desktop whilst headless. I hadnt put :1 after the IP on connection config.
 
This threads gone a bit quiet. What Pi related shenanigans have been going on the past month?
Me- I’ve been a bit “busy” but whilst able, I’ve been battling with Retropie and various configurations/emulators. I must be doing something wrong as almost everything I’ve tried has involved lots of farting about with things- as opposed to the ‘works out of the box’ type stuff often read.
In other news- old laptop project for arduino now abandoned...my mrs has informed me I’ve a brand new cheapo (what I made noises about needing to her) on the way- to tinker with Arduino/python.

It’s a Ventura Bravo 2 Laptop/tablet combo thing with win 10. The reviews on it are bloody awful but...I only need it for one thing. Mission creep will n doubt occurr though...
 
Does anyone out there in the real world understand any of the above gibberish, or care?
Edit:- and why would you want to piss on a raspberry?
I clicked out of curiosity as I had no idea what raspberry piss meant. It did bring to mind the aftermath of a bit of bladder surgery I had done a few years ago.
 

Sarastro

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
This threads gone a bit quiet. What Pi related shenanigans have been going on the past month?
I did have a look over the winter at using some Pis for the stuff I was talking about earlier in the thread, but it turns out that a) the power consumption is indeed too high. A shame, since b) it would be nice to have an understandable Linux interface and everything that comes with it, but not much use if it's not turned on. I suspect that a) and b) are linked, since Linuxes mostly seem to be built around server shells and seem to have a little allowance for hibernating, but I gave up spending time trying to reduce processes.

Exciting stuff, this thread.
 
I did have a look over the winter at using some Pis for the stuff I was talking about earlier in the thread, but it turns out that a) the power consumption is indeed too high. A shame, since b) it would be nice to have an understandable Linux interface and everything that comes with it, but not much use if it's not turned on. I suspect that a) and b) are linked, since Linuxes mostly seem to be built around server shells and seem to have a little allowance for hibernating, but I gave up spending time trying to reduce processes.

Exciting stuff, this thread.
Hibernation is a hardware feature which the software accesses and enables. There are plenty of low powered systems that use Linux. It just isn't the focus of the Raspberry Pi however.
 
I’ve only just bought a starter set and not used it yet. I quite like the idea of it being as self-contained as possible. Has anyone any recommendations for cases with inbuilt touchscreens?
 
I’ve only just bought a starter set and not used it yet. I quite like the idea of it being as self-contained as possible. Has anyone any recommendations for cases with inbuilt touchscreens?
The official touchscreen/tablet for about 80 quid?

My retropi is beasting along with 250 games. Sorry @supermatelot.
Other pi doing a great job as desktop and learning to solder. Still got my finger tips.
 

Sarastro

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Hibernation is a hardware feature which the software accesses and enables. There are plenty of low powered systems that use Linux. It just isn't the focus of the Raspberry Pi however.
Is that still widely true? I know it used to be a BIOS feature, but surely in most modern devices it's done by the OS.

It may also depend on what kind of hibernation. I would probably be more accurate to have said sleep mode: basically devices that power down everything except a few processes looking for remote inputs which will wake the device.
 
The official touchscreen/tablet for about 80 quid?

My retropi is beasting along with 250 games. Sorry @supermatelot.
Other pi doing a great job as desktop and learning to solder. Still got my finger tips.
Thanks. I did see the official one which is a 7” screen IIRC. I quite like the idea of a really compact little set-up so I was looking more at the aluminium cases with the screen (2”-3”) on top.
 
Is that still widely true? I know it used to be a BIOS feature, but surely in most modern devices it's done by the OS.

It may also depend on what kind of hibernation. I would probably be more accurate to have said sleep mode: basically devices that power down everything except a few processes looking for remote inputs which will wake the device.
Hibernation or sleep modes depend on the hardware having the ability to shut down and restart without having to do a reboot. The more power that is required to be saved, the more advanced the power saving features are required to be.

Wake up on input interrupt requires that the input chips have that capability built in. Wake up on a timed basis requires that there be a clock which runs while the CPU is shut down and can be scheduled to send a wake-up signal to the CPU when a target date and time is reached.

DRAM chips inherently require that they be constantly refreshed or they will lose their data. Either something has to remain awake and run the refresh cycle (consuming power in doing so), or that memory data has to be stored somewhere else and restored to DRAM on wake up (the latter is what is commonly known as hibernation).

Some hardware allows the CPU and DRAM to basically take short naps while waking up at frequent intervals with little overhead. Some hardware allows the CPU clock rate to be scaled up and down, with slower clock rates taking less power (I believe the Raspberry Pi even does this automatically if the CPU temperature gets too high).

All of these features are hardware enabled, because doing it in software would require running the board, which of course takes power and defeats the whole purpose. What the operating system does is that when these features are present, the OS configures the hardware registers to take advantage of them.

There are many ways of doing low power, with the the amount of power saving depending upon the methods used. The reason there are so many ways of doing this is that there are different trade-offs which are best applied in different applications.

So what you would need to do is to first of all define your power budget and then shop for hardware which meets it. The Raspberry Pi itself consumes a lot less power than a PC, but whether that is enough less than what you want isn't something that anyone can tell without you defining what your needs are.

The main thing to keep in mind is that to get really low power consumption you need to be able to essentially shut the board down and wake it up again at some future time or on a specific interrupt input. However, I don't believe the Raspberry Pi has implemented the circuitry for these features as the designers were trying to keep the price as low as possible.

There are external add-ons which can add this capability, here's an example. Note that it costs more than the R-Pi itself.
Sleepy Pi (Power Management Shield for Raspberry Pi) - Raspberry Pi in Canada
 
@GrumpyWasTooCheerful reminds me of this.




Moral of the story, just go with the flow. If you want to get laid!
Not wishing to start a religious war but I prefer spaces over tabs and you can configure most programers editors to replace a tab with spaces as you type to save hitting the space bar three times* and I prefer vim over emacs.

*insert your preferred indentation here.
 
An interesting project appeared in magpi magazine. A seeing stick for the blind. Pi zero, camera and a speaker. When pointed and a button pressed, a still image is sent off to a Microsoft AI engine, which identifies what is in the image and sends it back to the pi, which then speaks. The demo video was impressive, saying their was a dog in front of a door.

I've just bought a 1.44" LCD display for a pi zero. I'm thinking of a pocket WiFi probe detector to demonstrate what my security system can do.

Sent from my neocore_E1R1 using Tapatalk
 
An interesting project appeared in magpi magazine. A seeing stick for the blind. Pi zero, camera and a speaker. When pointed and a button pressed, a still image is sent off to a Microsoft AI engine, which identifies what is in the image and sends it back to the pi, which then speaks. The demo video was impressive, saying their was a dog in front of a door.

I've just bought a 1.44" LCD display for a pi zero. I'm thinking of a pocket WiFi probe detector to demonstrate what my security system can do.

Sent from my neocore_E1R1 using Tapatalk
It's a good example of what can be done, provided you don't get overly dependent upon the AI working. AI systems can do some very impressive things, provided they are things they were trained to do. If you get outside of their area of training, they can make some very surprising and often hilarious mistakes.
 
When I was typing the above reply, there was an ad for "Industrial" RPis. I clicked on the ad to have a look at what it was about, and there is a company (Comfile) who are selling flat panel PCs based on the Raspberry Pi alongside their Windows 7/10 and Windows CE products.

Industrial flat panel PCs have screen, motherboard, and various options all in one box and are designed to be mounted in a whole cut in a metal enclosure which you can then mount to your factory machinery. They also have I/O boards to allow you to connect valves, sensors, and similar devices to it. You would need to write software which does whatever it is you want the system to do.

I haven't bought one anything from this company, so I can't offer any comments on the quality of the build. However, the industrial control field is notoriously conservative when it comes to new technology so this shows that the RPi is being taken seriously in the commercial world.
 
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