Ranger Brigade(s)

The tone of this thread seems to be concentrating on 1 SCOTS and their trials and tribulations, but this is happening to 4 infantry battalions. The others being 2PWRR, 2 Lancs and 4 Rifles, all going through the same metamorphosis.

4 battalions effectively wiped from the infantry Orbat and very easy to cut when the experiment fails! Statements that no cap badges have been lost, while accurate, is very misleading. No doubt that will be trumpeted again when the Ranger Bns are axed in a few months time.
FOC
 
I fear my nation is being presented with a Land capability that offers security through low-budget window dressing.
Self-quoting, unapologetically

Elsewhere in the world (and I'm not quoting a solo source):


This (irrespective of its funding stream) is worth a look, too:

 
From the link.

"Ranger Regiments of the Army Special Operations Brigade" . . . or, Army SOBs ?! . . . ;) .

Was this acronym deliberate ?!

Capture.PNG
 
The lads who pass out of the depot in 2022 won't care. They'll give their loyalty to whatever cap badge they're wearing and fight the Queen's enemies on command (and anybody else on impulse).

The rest is old men's sentimentality.
And if the recruiting environment sends infantry recruits to whatever battalion it needs to shore up, rather than the local one they wanted to join, then the Army has broken the link anyway. And should stop banging on about the unique bonds the cap badge engenders.
 
And if the recruiting environment sends infantry recruits to whatever battalion it needs to shore up, rather than the local one they wanted to join, then the Army has broken the link anyway. And should stop banging on about the unique bonds the cap badge engenders.

I'd give all infantry recruits identical berets with an ITC cap badge. During the half year of training they'd be assessed for individual aptitude: Light role, mech, armoured, ranger etc. Factors like mechanical aptitude, spatial awareness, and driving ability, or skill at compass work, fieldcraft and a capacity for bergan marches would be considered, perhaps with some form of psychometric testing. Recruits would receive a measure of career guidance and be offered postings to regiments on that basis, not according to the county they were recruited in.

VSOs, and some of the Old and Bold, would have an orgasm of rage and predict the end of the Army, the end of civilisation, and the end of the world. However distasteful it might be to get a Jock, a Cockney, and a Norfolk lad in your section, they might be better suited for the Battalion's role. That would become even more apparent as they promoted. The arms plot is finished and regiments are specialising. It makes sense to filter recruits by aptitude not by regional accent.

Young men are instinctively tribal, and hard wired for hunting, fighting and exploration. Put a bunch of motivated lads together, bond them through hard training, and the rest takes care of itself. It's a process that worked long before humans had even discovered agriculture.
 
I'd give all infantry recruits identical berets with an ITC cap badge. During the half year of training they'd be assessed for individual aptitude: Light role, mech, armoured, ranger etc. Factors like mechanical aptitude, spatial awareness, and driving ability, or skill at compass work, fieldcraft and a capacity for bergan marches would be considered, perhaps with some form of psychometric testing. Recruits would receive a measure of career guidance and be offered postings to regiments on that basis, not according to the county they were recruited in.

VSOs, and some of the Old and Bold, would have an orgasm of rage and predict the end of the Army, the end of civilisation, and the end of the world. However distasteful it might be to get a Jock, a Cockney, and a Norfolk lad in your section, they might be better suited for the Battalion's role. That would become even more apparent as they promoted. The arms plot is finished and regiments are specialising. It makes sense to filter recruits by aptitude not by regional accent.

Young men are instinctively tribal, and hard wired for hunting, fighting and exploration. Put a bunch of motivated lads together, bond them through hard training, and the rest takes care of itself. It's a process that worked long before humans had even discovered agriculture.
The principle works well enough for all the various Corps.
 

riksavage

War Hero
Compare and contrast:

Structure_of_the_Arm%C3%A9e_de_Terre_2018.png


And they also have a decent sized and capable Navy and Air Force and their own Nuclear Deterrent.

The French Army is concentrating currently on improving the higher intensity warfare end of the full spectrum of operational capability with the aim of being able to effectively deploy a full divison into such a conflict should it be necessary.

Are we missing a trick somewhere.
Yes, competent leadership. This is all about burning through cash on failed projects, then suddenly realising there’s no magic money tree, so cut manpower to divert limited funds to the next w*** mag fantasy piece of kit still on the drawing board. Rinse and repeat until we have just one ’cutting edge, envy of the world tank’ to parade about in followed by a myriad of light infantry in fancy hats and brightly coloured stable belts. Please keep up!
 
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New sign. How lovely.

D39A3F47-E0ED-4B78-838F-961AE388BA43.jpeg
 
I've only been to one of their Officer's Messes, and I have forgot which one. Memory's a bit dodgy now.

In my hazy recollection, the walls had a few of those absurd Cuneo daubs (where there's a mouse winning the battle, and nobody's taking cover - I mean, just FerFvckSake!! :roll: ) and the lunchtime centrepiece was a 750ml Heinz Tomato Ketchup squeezy bottle.

That said, the only bits of which I'm uncertain of, are the ketchup brand name, and the size of the bottle ^~
Probably getting it mixed up with one of your care homes Stonker.
 
Were not a few of the original 25 Selous Scouts Police Officers
No, they were TA soldiers who were instructors at the Tracking Wing, School of Infantry at Kariba. They were all Game Rangers in civilian life who worked for the National Game Parks. Besides being excellent at bushcraft they also spoke the local Shona and Matabele languages of the two predominant African tribes in the country and had an intimate knowledge of the people and their customs including the indigenous Shangani bush men.
 

riksavage

War Hero
Hackworth in his book ‘About Face’ is pretty damning about specialist teams in Vietnam. He said they were forever getting into trouble; out gunned and out numbered, requiring regular troops to risk their lives trying to rescue them.

The problem with the Ranger Regiment concept of operations is there’s nobody in the vicinity to rescue them. 16 Air Assault will be waiting on the tarmac for the RAF to finish their breakfast, they’ll arrive just in time to fill body bags.
 

Cynical

LE
Book Reviewer
Hackworth in his book ‘About Face’ is pretty damning about specialist teams in Vietnam. He said they were forever getting into trouble; out gunned and out numbered, requiring regular troops to risk their lives trying to rescue them.

The problem with the Ranger Regiment concept of operations is there’s nobody in the vicinity to rescue them. 16 Air Assault will be waiting on the tarmac for the RAF to finish their breakfast, they’ll arrive just in time to fill body bags.
Once a Warrior King by David Donovan is an excellent memoir of one of the team leaders, in which isolation and vulnerability are clear (despite huge US presence).
 
I'd give all infantry recruits identical berets with an ITC cap badge. During the half year of training they'd be assessed for individual aptitude: Light role, mech, armoured, ranger etc. Factors like mechanical aptitude, spatial awareness, and driving ability, or skill at compass work, fieldcraft and a capacity for bergan marches would be considered, perhaps with some form of psychometric testing. Recruits would receive a measure of career guidance and be offered postings to regiments on that basis, not according to the county they were recruited in.

VSOs, and some of the Old and Bold, would have an orgasm of rage and predict the end of the Army, the end of civilisation, and the end of the world. However distasteful it might be to get a Jock, a Cockney, and a Norfolk lad in your section, they might be better suited for the Battalion's role. That would become even more apparent as they promoted. The arms plot is finished and regiments are specialising. It makes sense to filter recruits by aptitude not by regional accent.

Young men are instinctively tribal, and hard wired for hunting, fighting and exploration. Put a bunch of motivated lads together, bond them through hard training, and the rest takes care of itself. It's a process that worked long before humans had even discovered agriculture.
This works perfectly well at sea, and has done for quite some time.
 

QRK2

LE
I'd give all infantry recruits identical berets with an ITC cap badge. During the half year of training they'd be assessed for individual aptitude: Light role, mech, armoured, ranger etc. Factors like mechanical aptitude, spatial awareness, and driving ability, or skill at compass work, fieldcraft and a capacity for bergan marches would be considered, perhaps with some form of psychometric testing. Recruits would receive a measure of career guidance and be offered postings to regiments on that basis, not according to the county they were recruited in.


Which is pretty much what happened to new entrants in the Second War for the initial weeks of training.
 
From the link.

"Ranger Regiments of the Army Special Operations Brigade" . . . or, Army SOBs ?! . . . ;) .

Was this acronym deliberate ?!

View attachment 619724

Scuffed and scratched already...

It looks cheap and nasty - and no doubt made by the company which put in the cheapest bid...
 

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